Interference Engine?
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Thread: Interference Engine?

  1. #1
    crv|oc Rank: Member
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    Interference Engine?

    Is the Gen1 engine?

    I have a 2000 CRV with 57K miles. Should I change the timming belt?

    Is it something that can be tackled with standard tools? Would I be in deep water if I do it myself?

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  3. #2
    crv|oc Rank: Sophomore
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrenchmeister View Post
    Is the Gen1 engine?

    I have a 2000 CRV with 57K miles. Should I change the timming belt?

    Is it something that can be tackled with standard tools? Would I be in deep water if I do it myself?
    Short answer: Yes.

    Longer answer: When Honda was still manufacturing engines with rubber timing belts -- (yes, yes -- I know it is a very strong belt with incredibly strong Aramid fiber reinforcement) -- Honda recommended replacing the belt every 90k miles or seven years, whichever came first. You are running on borrowed time.

    And, yes, your engine is an interference engine. Some truly ugly things will happen if the timing belt breaks while the engine is running, particularly if it's running at high rpm.

    WRT your question about replacing the timing belt yourself, if you google your question, you will find many very good threads, as well as videos, on the subject. (Honda-tech.com is a good board for this as well.) The problem for the DIY'er is removing and replacing the nut on the crankshaft pulley (among other things). IMHO, you will not be able to accomplish this with "standard (hand) tools." Stated differently, at some point you will need access to a pneumatic torque wrench to get the nut off the crankshaft pulley.

    Also, if you haven't done so already, you should replace the water pump when you replace the timing belt. If you don't, you'll end up doing essentially the same work a second time to replace the WP. Thus, if you opt to have this work done by Honda or an independent, ensure they include replacement of the WP in their estimate of the cost.

  4. #3
    crv|oc Rank: Member
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    Thanks Ratchet

    Torque and impact guns are part of my tool set, that's np.

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/e11012...IF%3AUS%3A1123

    Any other tools and chemicals? I see this kit on ebay, what's your opinion on its quality and cost?

    What is the estimated labor time for this task? the typical $$$charge$$ at a dealer?

    I like to service my own vehicles if I am not in deep waters, like rebuilding a transmission, but I find myself with less and less time to do it every time. There are two dealers in the area, but one of them I know that they are rapists and take advantage of their customers and the other is in the Mx, side of the border. I talked to the service rep. and show them the engine, they are not familiar with it. Gen1 CRV was not distribuited down there. They said they could figure it out and do it, (yeah,right, I'm going to let you...)

    I am considering do it myself or an independent.

    Thanks again for all the help.
    Last edited by Wrenchmeister; 07-28-2011 at 06:56 AM.

  5. #4
    crv|oc Rank: Sophomore
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    Wrenchmeister,

    Your link didn't take me to the kit you mentioned, but Honda sells one, so I have some idea what it consists of but I don't know the cost. (You can ask Lizzard; he's a Honda parts representative, and he can tell you exactly what it costs.)

    A complete Honda timing belt replacement package consists of a timing belt, new belts for the water pump and accessories, a water pump, various oil seals, gaskets and replacement coolant. Ballpark estimate: $250 for a Honda kit.

    I think Honda books six hours for the work, but I'm not sure.

    I've done this job twice working with friends, and have paid to have it done once. Significantly, I paid Honda to do the work after I'd done it for others. The time I paid to have the work done, my then-local Honda dealer (Brown's Honda in Arlington, VA) sent out a flyer offering to do the work for $390, and I jumped on it. Knowing what's involved, I wouldn't hesitate to pay that again. Others have paid nearly twice that. Frequently you'll see offers around $350-$400, but when you read what that includes, you find it doesn't include a new water pump, the belts for the accessories or replacement coolant.

    The work isn't that difficult -- camshaft/crank timing is crucial, of course --but getting the nut off the crankshaft and re-torquing it to spec is real work. Don't hold me to it, but if memory serves, the crank pulley torques to more than 200 lbs. It may be 225. Trying to get the nut off without mucking it up and, later, pulling that poundage with a hand-held torque wrench with the engine in the car is damn near impossible.

    I recommend watching a few of the online videos to get a feel for what's involved. It's not that technical a job, but access to a Honda tech manual is essential to ensure you follow the procedures in the sequence outlined.

  6. #5
    crv|oc Rank: Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchet View Post
    Wrenchmeister,

    Your link didn't take me to the kit you mentioned, but Honda sells one, so I have some idea what it consists of but I don't know the cost. (You can ask Lizzard; he's a Honda parts representative, and he can tell you exactly what it costs.)

    A complete Honda timing belt replacement package consists of a timing belt, new belts for the water pump and accessories, a water pump, various oil seals, gaskets and replacement coolant. Ballpark estimate: $250 for a Honda kit.

    I think Honda books six hours for the work, but I'm not sure.

    I've done this job twice working with friends, and have paid to have it done once. Significantly, I paid Honda to do the work after I'd done it for others. The time I paid to have the work done, my then-local Honda dealer (Brown's Honda in Arlington, VA) sent out a flyer offering to do the work for $390, and I jumped on it. Knowing what's involved, I wouldn't hesitate to pay that again. Others have paid nearly twice that. Frequently you'll see offers around $350-$400, but when you read what that includes, you find it doesn't include a new water pump, the belts for the accessories or replacement coolant.

    The work isn't that difficult -- camshaft/crank timing is crucial, of course --but getting the nut off the crankshaft and re-torquing it to spec is real work. Don't hold me to it, but if memory serves, the crank pulley torques to more than 200 lbs. It may be 225. Trying to get the nut off without mucking it up and, later, pulling that poundage with a hand-held torque wrench with the engine in the car is damn near impossible.

    I recommend watching a few of the online videos to get a feel for what's involved. It's not that technical a job, but access to a Honda tech manual is essential to ensure you follow the procedures in the sequence outlined.
    The torque on the crankshaft pulley bolt is tight but nowhere near 200+ pounds. The Helms manual has it at 130 for the 1st Gen. That being said, anyone who has tackled this job would swear the factory has it torqued at 200+

    I darn near popped a vein in my forehead removing mine. IMO, getting that bolt off is 3/4's of the battle.

    Another handy trick is to stick 3/16"(?) drill bits in the camholders to hold the cams stationary at TDC when installing the new belt. Install the bits after everything is lined up at TDC(with the old belt still on) and then remove the old belt. If you don't do this both cams will move when you remove the old belt and you'll eventually be cussing like a sailor.
    Just remember to remove the bits after you've slipped on the new belt.
    Black '98 LX
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  7. #6
    crv|oc Rank: Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by headknocker View Post
    The torque on the crankshaft pulley bolt is tight but nowhere near 200+ pounds. The Helms manual has it at 130 for the 1st Gen. That being said, anyone who has tackled this job would swear the factory has it torqued at 200+

    I darn near popped a vein in my forehead removing mine. IMO, getting that bolt off is 3/4's of the battle.

    Another handy trick is to stick 3/16"(?) drill bits in the camholders to hold the cams stationary at TDC when installing the new belt. Install the bits after everything is lined up at TDC(with the old belt still on) and then remove the old belt. If you don't do this both cams will move when you remove the old belt and you'll eventually be cussing like a sailor.
    Just remember to remove the bits after you've slipped on the new belt.
    Thanks for the tips Headk. Ill make sure I learn the procedure right and have the tools (including beer :-) ) before tackling it. What did you use to hold the pulley?

  8. #7
    crv|oc Rank: Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrenchmeister View Post
    Thanks for the tips Headk. Ill make sure I learn the procedure right and have the tools (including beer :-) ) before tackling it. What did you use to hold the pulley?
    You're very welcome.

    I made my own crankshaft pulley holder from an idea given by Curly on the hondasuv.forum. I don't remember the name of it but it's a hex-shaped plumbing fitting which you simply grind down the edges a little bit, the points in particular, and it fits the sprocket opening like a glove. You then hold the fitting with a big pipe wrench. It ain't pretty but it works...and it was cheap.

    Or you can just buy the dedicated tool but it will cost you some money.
    Black '98 LX
    Kenwood eXcelon KDC-X589 HU
    Aura MR 6.1 comps in custom kickpanel pods
    Aura MR62 Integrated comps in rear factory locations
    Ascendant Audio Arsenal 12 in spare tire well
    US Acoustics USX-4065(65 WATTS X 4)
    PG 8.0:1 mono amp(600 watts rms x 1)

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