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    1. · Registered
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      4 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #10 ·
      Thanks for the suggestions guys! I guess the dealer may be a good idea here. Although, the other ideas given here are pretty good, and may be worth a shot. The impact I was using was a 1/2 inch electric Ridgid impact, I'll throw a link for it down below. Its crazy, I have been able to remove any other fill bolt I've tried, but this one is something else! And then with the silicone being so close, heat doesn't seem to be an option unfortunately. If I do take it to the dealer this time around, then should I crack the fill bolt off when I get the car back home and do something to make it easier for the next time so I don't have to take it to the dealer again? From my experience, dealers usually torque things down with a few ugga duggas making it difficult next time I try to DIY.

       
    2. · Premium Member
      2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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      9,585 Posts
      Thanks for the suggestions guys! I guess the dealer may be a good idea here. Although, the other ideas given here are pretty good, and may be worth a shot. The impact I was using was a 1/2 inch electric Ridgid impact, I'll throw a link for it down below. Its crazy, I have been able to remove any other fill bolt I've tried, but this one is something else! And then with the silicone being so close, heat doesn't seem to be an option unfortunately. If I do take it to the dealer this time around, then should I crack the fill bolt off when I get the car back home and do something to make it easier for the next time so I don't have to take it to the dealer again? From my experience, dealers usually torque things down with a few ugga duggas making it difficult next time I try to DIY.

      I bet the core issue here is two fold:

      1) zealous torque down at the factory when assembled.

      2) dis-similar metals between bolt and casing that over time cause either temperature or chemical (or both) induced freeze-up of the threads. I believe the casing is an aluminum alloy and the bolt is of course some alloy of steel.

      I bet Honda dealers have a method to deal with these pesky hard to remove differential bolts
       
    3. · Registered
      03 CRV
      Joined
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      1,013 Posts
      Thanks for the suggestions guys! I guess the dealer may be a good idea here. Although, the other ideas given here are pretty good, and may be worth a shot. The impact I was using was a 1/2 inch electric Ridgid impact, I'll throw a link for it down below. Its crazy, I have been able to remove any other fill bolt I've tried, but this one is something else! And then with the silicone being so close, heat doesn't seem to be an option unfortunately. If I do take it to the dealer this time around, then should I crack the fill bolt off when I get the car back home and do something to make it easier for the next time so I don't have to take it to the dealer again? From my experience, dealers usually torque things down with a few ugga duggas making it difficult next time I try to DIY.

      Im curious as to what kind of adapters/universals/extensions you used with the impact wrench.

      FWIW, I would have never even thought about using an impact wrench for the two differential plugs. Ive always used ratchets or breaker bars, usually around 15” in length.
       
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