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Discussion Starter #1
The blower motor operates intermittently. Seems when the CRV sits overnight everything works, The blower motor works on all speeds, the Cooling and heating both work. After you drive around and get it up to operating temp then cut it off, when you come back out and start it up again the blower doesn't work at all on any speed. Changed out the blower motor resistor and that didn't help, same problem. All the fuses are OK as is the blower motor relay. When the blower motor doesn't work still have 12v coming to the motor. Problem seems to be in the grounding circuit. I can unplug the 4 prong connector on the resistor and run a jumper across the two grounding plugs and the motor runs on high.

Any suggestions about this problem or has anyone else had this same problem?
 

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2005 and 2006 EX AWD
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the wires that you jump are the blu/black to the black and it works is usually the power transistor maybe the connector or defective transistor or the signal to the transistor , the metal relay in the under hood box controls positive to the blower as you said,so probably the signal to the transistor here's some info
 

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Pretty sure it is not the relay. Even when the blower does not cone on you can test the positive wire at the motor and it had 12v. The transistor in the system is a brand new one as like you I though that was the problem. Also looked at the connections at the motor and the Transistor and they also look fine. I was hoping that I wouldn't have to tear the dash apart to get access to the wiring harnesses that run to the control panel and the motors that control all the routing doors in the HVAC ducts. It look to me that I'm looking for a bad terminal connection or a wire someplace inn those harnesses that is grounded or shorted out.
 

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maybe this helps I copied this from a manual,(((((((((((

1. Unplug the blower transistor and check for battery voltage at the Blue/Black wire, jump from the Blue/Black to the Black wire and verify that the fan will run. If it doesn't, verify that the blower power transistor ground is good on the Black wire.

2. Scope the Blue/Yellow wire voltage signal from the heater control unit-panel to the blower power transistor - voltage signal. This signal controls the blower power transistor, which then controls the ground side of the blower motor. At low speed the climate control module should provide about 2.1 V to this wire. The voltage steps up about .1 V for each blower speed, ending at about 2.8 V with blower running on high. If there is no signal, power up an old style test light and remove the Blue/Yellow wire from the blower power transistor. Then with the key on touch the test light to the terminal of the power transistor that the Blue/Yellow wire was connected. If the power transistor is OK, the blower motor should work.

3. If the power transistor has failed, test the current draw of the blower motor as high current draw can damage the blower transistor.
 

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maybe this helps I copied this from a manual,(((((((((((

1. Unplug the blower transistor and check for battery voltage at the Blue/Black wire, jump from the Blue/Black to the Black wire and verify that the fan will run. If it doesn't, verify that the blower power transistor ground is good on the Black wire.

2. Scope the Blue/Yellow wire voltage signal from the heater control unit-panel to the blower power transistor - voltage signal. This signal controls the blower power transistor, which then controls the ground side of the blower motor. At low speed the climate control module should provide about 2.1 V to this wire. The voltage steps up about .1 V for each blower speed, ending at about 2.8 V with blower running on high. If there is no signal, power up an old style test light and remove the Blue/Yellow wire from the blower power transistor. Then with the key on touch the test light to the terminal of the power transistor that the Blue/Yellow wire was connected. If the power transistor is OK, the blower motor should work.

3. If the power transistor has failed, test the current draw of the blower motor as high current draw can damage the blower transistor.
Thanks for all your input, all that was helpful tracking down my problem. After doing a lot of testing outlined in the Honda manual as well as test other had recommended I finally focused in on the problem. Looks like my problems turns out to be a worn out set of blower motor brushes. No cure for that except to replace that little expensive motor. Thanks everyone for all your feedback.
 
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