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I have a 2008 CRV and the stupid TPMS light has come on twice now. I had a valve stem that broke and was replaced by the dealer last week, Thursday actually. I picked my car up from the dealership Thursday night after having a loaner car for the day Thursday. Friday Morning the TPMS light came on. I called the dealershipand they said to bring it in on Saturday morning. The car was there all day Saturday. They said they found a nail in my tire and plugged it for a whopping $40 bucks! I did not get a low tire indicator light just the TMPs light. I read the Owner's manual and it said that the TMPS light indicates a problem with the System. The Tire cut with the ! is for a low tire. The dealer told me that I probably got the nail on my way to work and the tire pressure dropped below the threshold for the low tire indicator light and that triggered the TPMS light. I want to know why I did not get a flat then if the car sat idle all day Friday after the TPMS light came on and even that night before I drove it to the dealership Saturday morning. I think something was not done correctly or did not take when they replaced the tire fill stem/Sensor. So i picked up the car after it was a the dealer all day Saturday. It sat in the driveway all weekend and Monday morning guess what bright ray of sunshine flashed in my face..... Yup the TMPS light AGAIN! I called the dealer at 7:30 am and they said to bring it back in.

Can anyone help me out with what this may be???????
 

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TPMS Headaches

It definitely sounds as though your dealer is not doing something right. As you correctly noted the TPMS light indicates a system problem and the tire cutaway represents the low tire warning.

There is a procedure in the dealer prep, for reducing the tire pressure and restoring it again. You may try that before going back to the dealer. Just do the tire that had the bad valve stem. Here is the procedure from the 08 dealer PDI:

Make Sure the TPMS Sensors Are Operational, and
Set the Tire Pressures
NOTE: If this procedure is not done during the PDI, the
TPMS indicator will come on after about 20 miles.
When the TPMS indicator comes on, the TPMS control
unit also sets one or more of these TPMS DTCs: 32,
34, 36, 38, and/or 41. The repair of any of these DTCs
at PDI, or shortly after, is not warrantable.
To make sure the TPMS sensors are operational and
the tire pressures are set, do this:
1. Turn the ignition switch to LOCK (0).
2. Use a tire pressure gauge with a bleeder valve to
quickly lower the pressure in one tire to 18 psi or
less.
NOTE:
• The tire pressure must be lowered by at least
3 psi within 15 seconds, or the TPMS sensor in
the wheel will not be activated.
• To ensure accuracy, periodically check your tire
pressure gauge with the calibration tool,
P/N 07AAJ-000A100, H/C 8298457. This tool
was sent to all dealerships in August ’06.
3. Adjust the tire pressure to the cold inflation
pressure listed on the driver’s doorjamb sticker. If
you are in a cold climate region, make sure the tire
is at the same temperature as the outside air before
adjusting the pressure; otherwise, the TPMS low
pressure indicator may show low tire pressure in
cold weather.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the other three tires.
NOTE: The spare tire does not have a TPMS
sensor. Make sure that the spare tire is inflated to
the pressure listed on the doorjamb sticker.

Here is the PDI in TSB 07-052

http://www.in.honda.com/Rjanisis/pubs/SB/A07-052.PDF

The fixing the nail thing does sound like a crock. The nail should not cause the TPMS system light to come on.

If you take it back to the dealer and it is not fixed the third time I would file a complaint with Honda at the 800 number in your owner's manual.

In all fairness however, do be aware that it may take up to 100 miles for the light to come on or go off. Another thing you may consider is running it for a week and see if the light goes off.

When I change my non TPMS winter steelies, it can take close to 100 miles for the light to come on and then another 100 for the light to go off in the spring.

Good luck with your TPMS, keep us posted.



 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tpms issues!!!!

Black Pearl,

Thank you for responding to my forum. I did bring the vehicle back to the dealer on 9/21/09.

They have a remote that check that all of the sensors are active.They were. They then deactivate the tire Sensors and reprograms them. Apparently when they replaced the broken valve stem/sensor the TPMS system did not recognize the sensor even though the sensor was operating. They said that it is not uncommon that they have to reprogram all of the tires after a repair. Surprisingly it took them all of about 15 minutes!

If this is a common problem they should be reprogramming the TPMS system after a repair to save Owners the headache.

The good news is that the light has not come back on since, Knock on Wood, and I will be having my new tires put on in a couple weeks Cooper CS4. Thank goodness for this. The Bridgestone Duellers are crap! That is a whole other story!
 

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Another Bridgestone dueler unhappy customer added to an ever growing list.You will notice a big difference with the Coopers or any other non OEM tire.
 

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I just recently purchased a used 2008 CRV. About a week after purchase, had the same thing happen - just going down the road, the TPMS light would come on - then after a while go off again! After a couple of days of this, I tried something - just inflated the tires to about 5 psig over rating, then bled them back down to about 1 psig above rating on the driver door sticker. No problems since, drove vehicle from TX to northern Michigan & back, no recurrence - TPMS lights all staying off. So far, so good.
 

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Hi, I have 2008 Honda CRV.
A month ago, my TPMS light was on, and then I went to F*******E to reset it.
Two weeks later, the light was on (again) after driving 15 miles from home. Therefore, I went to F*******E to reset it (again).
Same story, the light was on (again) after driving 15 miles from home. Therefore, I went to F*******E to reset it (again).
Another story, the light was on (again) after driving 15 miles from home. Therefore, this morning, I went to F*******E (again) to reset it.
But this time they said that the right rear sensor was bad and needed to replace. After replaced it, no luck, TPMS light still on. They believe the car’s computer not yet recognized the new sensor. Since they do not have the tools, they told me to go to Honda Dealership to reset it.
Can somebody help me to solve this problem?
 

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Can someone explain the different of
1. Clone a tpms sensor
2. Reprogram tpms to car computer
3. Copy a tpms sensor
4. When I replace one or four tpms, which procedure must be used in 1,2,3 above?
Thank you
 

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I am so happy that two of my three cars predate the TPMS nonsense. My third car has "issues" with its TPMS system, and I think they are a high priced waste of time. It's much easier to just keep an eye on your tires, which you should do anyway.
 

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Here's what I know about these sensors, at least as it applies to the Gen3 ones, and it isn't a lot, but here it is: Each sensor has two numbers on it. One is the series number, and they all need to be the same - in other words, the correct model for the vehicle year. The second number is a frequency group designator (I don't know the technical name for it). There are a limited number of these for each series, but each of your four sensors needs to have a different one, so that you do not have two sensors broadcasting on the same exact frequency. Also, there are supposed to be enough different ones so that you don't pull up at a light next to someone with the same ones and have that situation throw your system off. So, if you are replacing just one sensor, there are only two ways to get it right. Either you have to pull all four and record the numbers, or you need to make sure that the single replacement new one has a number that matches the series, and a frequency number that is equal to, or the same as, the one on the old sensor. Otherwise you could wind up installing one that has the same frequency as one of the other three, and have two on the same frequency, in which case the system will only see three, and you will get a light. Any of the shops or dealers who do this stuff are supposed to know all this and follow correct procedure. Good luck with that.
 

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I had the same issue in 2008 CRV. Every oil change mechanic put air in all four tires. This time before going for an oil change I put nitrogen from Costco. Now you got nitrogen + air at pretty high pressure around 36 psi.

After driving for 10 miles I got TSMS (first time in 10 years). A mechanic told me to reduce the tire pressure to 30 psi (recommended by honda). It made no difference even if I went to Costco and got the tire pressure to 30 psi.

I was due for tire rotation and went to Costco. They have an optional package for TPMS (total $50 per senor). A guy at the counter told me we can scan all four tires for free. He went ahead to check all four tires. He told me two in the back are faulty and need replacement. I decided not to install it since they were out of stock.

I wanted to give some time for TPMS to automatic recalibrate since 2008 doesn't provide any way for you to do it. As soon as I drove 2 miles light went off and haven't come back for 2 days. Hopefully reading Costco mechanic was wrong in diagnostic but rotating tires where they refill the tires did the trick.

So you have to do this cycle twice i.e. get it to 30 PSI and do the same next day. Hopefully, it helps someone who has a faulty senor since Costco charges $50 per tire and reprogramming as well. They do TPMS senor check for FREE of charge.
 

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After driving for 10 miles I got TSMS (first time in 10 years).
Was that the low tire pressure warning light (picture below), or the "TPMS" system light? There is a difference.

Something I have noticed in our blue 2009 CR-V is that rather than show the low tire pressure warning light does not come on when pressure is low, but the TPMS light does. When I scanned the wheels, coincidentally the wheel showing low pressure is also the one where the TPMS sensor has a low battery.

I think what is happening is that due to the low battery, the sensor does not get the right data to the vehicle--maybe it can't broadcast the radio signal far enough to be accurate? Whatever the cause, the errant reading is due to the sensor battery being at the end of its life. High pressure should not trigger Honda's TPMS system warning. It is not a condition that Honda checks for. (See the image of DTC error codes below--those are read by Honda's proprietary code reader.)

A scan of your tires should have included the battery status. These sensors send out the following data: tire pressure, sensor ID, battery status and tire temperature.

Sensors probably last ~10 years, and a 2008-2009 CR-V is going to be right at that threshold. I proactively changed the four sensors on my own 2009 when I had new tires put on this summer, but the other '09 is still on the originals. I think I still have the old sensors here, so I'll swap in one of those until we change tires. Rock Auto and possibly Amazon may have the best price on the Denso sensors.


136767


DTC error codes (readable through HDS -- Honda's own "code reader"). Note that none are generated for high tire pressure, only low.

136768
 

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Was that the low tire pressure warning light (picture below), or the "TPMS" system light? There is a difference.

Something I have noticed in our blue 2009 CR-V is that rather than show the low tire pressure warning light does not come on when pressure is low, but the TPMS light does. When I scanned the wheels, coincidentally the wheel showing low pressure is also the one where the TPMS sensor has a low battery.

I think what is happening is that due to the low battery, the sensor does not get the right data to the vehicle--maybe it can't broadcast the radio signal far enough to be accurate? Whatever the cause, the errant reading is due to the sensor battery being at the end of its life. High pressure should not trigger Honda's TPMS system warning. It is not a condition that Honda checks for. (See the image of DTC error codes below--those are read by Honda's proprietary code reader.)

A scan of your tires should have included the battery status. These sensors send out the following data: tire pressure, sensor ID, battery status and tire temperature.

Sensors probably last ~10 years, and a 2008-2009 CR-V is going to be right at that threshold. I proactively changed the four sensors on my own 2009 when I had new tires put on this summer, but the other '09 is still on the originals. I think I still have the old sensors here, so I'll swap in one of those until we change tires. Rock Auto and possibly Amazon may have the best price on the Denso sensors.


View attachment 136767

DTC error codes (readable through HDS -- Honda's own "code reader"). Note that none are generated for high tire pressure, only low.

View attachment 136768
It was TPMS. I had a low tire pressure sign turn on while back due to nail in the tire. I believe my tires got overly inflated with nitrogen before going for an oil change and mechanic at the dealership put air in all four tires.

Costco technician told me to replace senor but the light went off after driving a couple of blocks. In the future, if the light turns on I will go to Costco for replacement ($50 for one including parts+labour). You can bring your own sensor and labor is around $7 bucks.
 

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It's probably a low battery in the sensor, so yes, replacing it should cure it. Their scanner should be able to tell which sensor(s) may have a low battery.
 
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