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Discussion Starter #1
I tried to search for this, but there's a million posts on brakes but I didn't see any that discussed this questions specifically... Went to rotate tires for the season but they were welded on but good, so let the dealer beat them off and they can check the brakes while they're at it. Turns out that despite the annual dealer rear brake pm lube job the rears need work (about 50k miles since last replacement). Now that the wheels can be taken off the car I don't mind doing the brake work myself and have started gathering part supplies. This time around I am considering replacing the caliper guide pins and boots thinking that since the V's have a predilection for sticking in the back end causing wear, they might as well get replaced. My question for those who have done their own brakes - do you replace the caliper pin hardware as point of fact (only adds about $20 to parts), or do you just clean things up and put the old sliders back in? I'd rather have them on hand in case I need them, and if I'm going to have them on hand I might as well replace them anyway. Thanks.
 

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If the old slide pins look like they're in good condition, just clean them up, grease them, and put them back in.

If they look damaged, then by all means replace them.

Usually it's not a damaged slide pain that will cause a caliper to stick. It's more likely to be an inadequately greased slide pin or a stuck piston.
 

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I agree with 09EX4WD if the pins are not damaged keep using them. Check the rubber boots if they are not torn or have holes in them. If they are in good shape reuse them, but if they are brittle replace them. Be sure you use Synthetic Brake grease if you can, as these will help seal & protect the sliders from corrosion compared to regular silicone brake grease. They costs more but will protect the system better. Lube the boots well, especially around where the pin & the caliper housing meets to prevent water intrusion. I would also suggest to grease the boots around the piston lightly to keep them supple. Pay attention which pins goes to as they have 1 with the rubber bushing. Usually it sits at the bottom of the caliper. The trick to taking out the tires when they are stuck on the hubs is to loosen the hub nuts about 5mm, then drive the vehicle slowly this will guarantee to break off the rust between them. Let us know.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the input. I'll make sure the pins and boots are available in case I need them but will plan on reusing them. Actually, now that I think about it the rear brakes on our V needed work early on around 25k miles, so I guess the pins themselves are not necessarily to blame but rather they just need frequent cleaning and re-lubing. There is something with this design that causes more wear on the rear brakes than any other vehicle I have ever owned.

I may get "coated" discs (the center hub area is powder coated) that perhaps will reduce the wheel welding that tends to occur so I can rotate more easily next time. Also, I suspect I'll end up drilling out those horrible rotor screws and not bother putting them back in. I was going to purchase an impact driver to have on hand, but that will be the only time I'll use it and a good drill bit is a lot cheaper.
 

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You are welcome! The engineers designed it for the brakes to be more biased at the back than the front to lessen the fish tailing effect. To reduce the welding effect you can use anti-sieze on the back of the wheels or in the front of the rotors where they contact with the alloy rims. I would suggest not to drill out the rotor screws try to use a regular bit that is stronger then install it to the ratchet to give you more leverage. But do not drill them out it will be more work. You can also use anti-sieze on them before placing them back. Also just make them snug, but not too tight to make it easier taking them out next time. The reason why Honda uses them to prevent the rotors from going side to side when cornering. As also this will also help the rotor stay in place just in case if your tire is loose the rotors won't as they are held by the set screws. These are engineering facts. I also forgot to mention when doing that trick in taking out the tires when they are stuck in the hub by driving around with loose bolts be ready for a loud gun shot sound! Let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
So I successfully completed the rear brakes this weekend and did end up changing the caliper pins after all. The pads on both sides were more "stuck" in position than I felt was reasonable and were a little difficult to get off the rotor. The driver side pins looked OK, but the passenger side top pin had some abrasion on it so I figured they might as well all get replaced.

Regarding those damn screws - I spent 10 minutes on the first one with all the tricks of hammering and then a chisel as I've read in several posts, but in the end it was MUCH quicker to drill them out... A good carbide drill went through them in about 20 seconds or less. I didn't think to buy new ones at the time (you can get a new set for about $4), so right now there are no screws in the rotors, and I'm not sure if I'll bother because the way the rotor fits around the center flange there is absolutely no way those rotors are going to move as long as the tire is on there.

Even with the screws drilled out, both rotors were practically welded to the hub and were a PITA to get off - I used the two other threaded holes and M8 x 1.25 bolts to push it off the hub and discovered yet another issue when one of the M8 bolts snapped off. Lesson learned that it pays to clean those threads out with a tap before attempting to remove a rust-welded rotor. Fortunately I was able to finally persuade the rotor to come off with the other side bolt and some hammering. The other side was welded on as well, but I used the tap to clean up the threads and it popped off when the bolts hit the hub plate.

I put anti-seize on the hub flange and the wheel contact areas to hopefully keep things from welding themselves solid in the future. All in all a bit more work than brake jobs I've done in the past on other brands, but it came out well and the new brakes are smooth and good.

Edit - Also wanted to mention that I got a good deal on Wagner ThermoQuiet Ceramic pads and was pretty impressed with their construction and fit... I usually have to clean up the tab ears on the pads for a good fit, but these went right into place and did not bind at all. After going through the battle removing the old rotors, I think I will splurge the few dollars extra to get "coated" rotors next time that hopefully resist corrosion that welds them on.

Edit 2 - Just wanted to reinforce the tip of making sure you have 2 M8x1.25 bolts and a thread tap on hand if when you're doing a CRV brake job... Nothing worse than a rotor half on the car when you start wondering what you're going to do! Got mine for around $8 locally and it's a lifesaving tool. Actually, my next tool investment is going to be a tap & die set (Santa?)
 

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Nice work! Especially the rear ones they are a PITA if they corroded into the hub, that's the reason
why I always use anti-sieze or even grease if anti-sieze is not available on the hub. You are going to Love the Wagner ThermoQuiet pads they are high grade ceramic. I have seen many saying on the box that they are ceramic but they are not, & will produce a lot of dirty brake dust that will coat your aluminum rims. But the Wagner TQ you won't see any dirty brake dust. They also last very long. The fitment is also superb, not like the others as you said you have to file the ears down to make them perfectly fit. Did yours came with hardware? I agree with you about the coated rotors they are good investment especially at the back brakes. Happy motoring!
 

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I also forgot to mention the Wagner TQ will take a while to break in as they use much more ceramic materials than others but once they broke in they will perform much better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My set of TQ pads came with the clip hardware, but no grease packet. Not a big deal as I prefer the Permetex Ultra Synthetic Lube anyway and occasionally need more than what is in that little packet. I've never used ceramic pads before but the TQ were highly rated and just looking at them I tend to agree - the integrated back insulator one piece construction is very solid feeling and does away with the clips on the back side that can be finicky to stay in position when you install. I've heard they are virtually dust free and last a long time, so even if I don't find them on sale when it comes time to do the front end I will certainly go for them again.

Despite having my local service dept perform the rear brake preventative maintenance on occasion, I don't know if they replace the hardware when they perform that service because the old clips looked pretty rough (one had rusted nearly through). Now that my car is out of warranty I plan to do as much of the service as within my capabilities, so I'll probably tear the brakes apart in the spring and clean them up myself (wife gets the new cars and feels better having dealer do work while under warranty - I get the hand me downs and do my own work lol).
 

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As far as I know The dealer just lube the slider pins & the check the pads for binding they do not replace the clip hardware. I agree with you in Regards about the Permatex Synthetic brake lube they are the best. The integrated rear shims work beautifully. You are correct they are virtually dust free. I believe that is the reason why they are more expensive compared to other cheap Ceramic pads. The quality makes the big difference. I also lube the ears of the pads before seating them to the clips to prevent rust & to keep them moving freely & retract back when you release the brake pedal. I forgot to mention that the Wagner TQ is also easier on the rotors.

I agree with you if the vehicle is still under warranty let them do the maintenance as its easier to claim for warranty. If we need to. As I say a happy wife we will also have a happy life.
 
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