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Discussion Starter #1
I recently adjusted my valve clearances on my 1999 Honda Cr-v Sport (I live in Australia) The engine is a RD1. To get each cylinder to its compression stroke so i could adjust them, i turned the crankshaft clockwise instead of anti-clockwise, which in hindsight i now know is incorrect but did not think it made much of a difference. I placed the valve cover back on and tried to start the engine. The engine was abnormally slow for cranking compared to before, so i removed the valve cover again and re-adjusted the clearances, but not by much (0.005" for intake, 0.007" for exhaust). I again tried to start it and this time it did, however required my foot pressing the accelerator a little bit. It ran very rough and after a few seconds i turned it off. I heard no loud bang or anything like that, just sounded like a typical badly timed engine. I removed the valve cover for a third time and noticed the timing belt was a bit loose between the two camshafts (by visual approx. 1 tooth but no more than 2 at the most).
What i want to know is if i have potentially f$%^#d my valves or other bits by being an idiot??
My car was stationary in the garage and the revs would not have gone above 1200 rpm for the few seconds it was running.
At present i am currently removing components so i can replace the old timing belt and water pump and inspect actually how much it has jumped.
What are the chances i did some serious damage being it wasnt on for long and didnt jumped many teeth?
The more information you guys spit out at me the better i will feel because at the moment i am peeking at what damage i might have caused.

The engine is a 2.0 Litre DOHC RD1, which i believe is the B20B engine, but could be wrong.

Lastly, any damage be confined to the head region and be low cost if i did it myself?

Once again, Thanks alot.
 

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My 2000 crv jumped/skipped 25 teeth on the highway. Replaced the timing belt and it started right away. No damage. I was lucky.
 

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That could be a B20Z2 engine I think. They went from B20B To Z in 99 (in the states anyway). Check your vin # it will reveal. Turning clockwise can be trouble because the belt tension-er won't and you miss time/adjust the valves. (as you discovered) You may only have to retime the valve train. When you have done the retime do a compression check. I doubt that any damage (bent valves) has occurred, but it will tell you.
 

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it will not harm the valves to have it jump a few teeth, you should be fine once you get it set correctly.

I had a weak tensioner on our Mazda and it skipped a few teeth right after it started once, it caused a really loud backfire and it exploded the catalytic conveyer. :mad: That cost more to replace than the darn tensioner, but the engine was fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks heaps for the quick responses fellas! My mate who was working on it with me rang another mate who is a mechanic to ask for advice when we were scratching our heads. He was like, "I bet the dumb ass turned the crankshaft the wrong way when adjusting them" haha. Most cars in Oz turn clockwise, but greater powers saw fit to screw me over that day. I will re-post again once i have replaced the timing belt and mention the compression test results. What should the readings be around for good compression? Any helpful hints/SAFE shortcuts to doing this? I heard CRV's are renown for burning exhaust valves, so depending on the results i may need to have work done eventually anyway.
 

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as far as I know every automobile engine manufacturer on the planet, at least all of the larger ones, have the engines rotate clockwise, EXCEPT Honda. also, have you noticed that the engine is in backward from the way all the other transverse installations, with the front of the engine on the left side and the trans on the right side (rather than the other way around)? Honda usually does not copy what the other manufacturers are doing.

good compression would be about 160-180 psi (or higher) each cylinder with all readings within about 15 psi of each other. Lubricate the threads of the compression tester insert with anti-seize or grease and block the throttle plate wide open. take all of the spark plugs out together so there is no compression on the other cylinders to get maximum cranking speed. If the crank rate slows after the first few tests, put a charger on the battery, usually if the battery is good it will not slow noticeable from the first to the last cylinder. some people like to crank the same amount of revs for each test but I have found that just watching the pressure gauge after about 7 to 10 revs the pressure reaches maximum and will not go higher with more cranking. If you have low compression (120-130 psi or less) you can run the test again with some oil squirted in the cylinders to verify it is the rings (which will raise the pressure), if the pressure only comes up about 4-5 psi or less with the oil it means the valves are not seating. Usually if you get one really low pressure out of the four it means valves (though I have seen damaged pistons or rings on once cylinder cause that too, but this is rare).

It is a fairly easy test. Write down the compression you find in each cylinder as you read it. Remember to release the pressure in the gauge after each test. You usually can rent a compression gauge at an auto parts store. Though they do not cost that much and if you intend to do your own work on your cars (especially if you intend to fix a lot of old cars) than it is a handy diagnostic tool to have anyway (normally it is not that useful for routine work like oil changes, spark plugs, etc).

the valves hold up well if the valve adjustment is kept within spec. the exhaust valve seat tends to get pounded down over time so there is little to no clearance at the top of the valve stem, and when it gets hot it will not allow the valve to close all the way (which causes it to overheat and get burned). So adjust it to the larger end of the range, check and adjust it per the service manual interval and you will be fine for the useful life of the car.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the detailed response Petros98. So just to confirm, if my readings are around the 160-180 PSI mark, i can stop worrying about if i have caused valve or piston damage? The car has only done 150000kms and blows no smoke so i would guess the rings are still in good order. It ran fine before i made any adjustments, however the valve clearance was far too tight to ignore.
 

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Thanks for the detailed response Petros98. So just to confirm, if my readings are around the 160-180 PSI mark, i can stop worrying about if i have caused valve or piston damage? The car has only done 150000kms and blows no smoke so i would guess the rings are still in good order. It ran fine before i made any adjustments, however the valve clearance was far too tight to ignore.
Even if your readings are down to say 140, as long as they are all similar (within 10-15lb) you are OK. As Petros98 has eloquently explained, you don't want to find them all way different or one a way out.
If you are saying the valves were too tight when you turned it the wrong way, I would just ignore those readings. You have to get the timing right and turn it Hondawise, and then you can take a new set of clearances. You may not get smoke from the pipe when it is burning/leaking some past the rings or valves because the cat con will burn it clean until it (the cat) gets plugged/polluted.
 

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yes, if your compression is good, your valves are all good. after you get the timing belt on properly you will want to double check your valve clearance per the service manual procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Happy New year to all!!! The hits keep coming from this god damn honda. Need to purchase a balancer removal tool from your great land just to get the crank pulley off apparently. Tried short cutting and drilling a hole right through one of the two holes that are already on it, then putting a hex key in there then securing with a chain. Just ended up bending the key. How do they get so bloody tight?!? Anyway now i have to wait another two weeks for it to arrive here after already being on holidays for five weeks forgetting about it :( Really hope this is worth it and my valves are fine.
 

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There are some write ups about the timing belt if you do a search in these forums with ideas on how to get that bolt loose. One involves using the 'starter' trick. I doubt you could have done any valve damage in what you did. Probably would have needed the timing belt replaced in the near future anyways. If you have an AWD, you probably should change the rear diffy fluid using Honda DP2 fluid, esp if it makes a rubbing or scraping type sound while making a slow tight turn.
Those old CRV are really great vehicles.
Best of luck.
Buffalo4
PS: Don't forget to replace the tensioner with a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ok not good. I have reassembled using a new timing belt, tensioner and water pump following the correct procedure and double checked the markings and everything else. I re-adjusted the valve clearences turning the engine anti-clockwise this time. The engine would crank but would not start so i checked the spark plugs and replaced the leads but still nothing. I then did a COLD compression test. The results were (Cylinder 1 - 90 Psi) (Cylinder 2 - 30 Psi) (Cylinder 3 - 90 Psi) (Cylinder 4 - 70 Psi). When i removed the spark plug on cylinder 3 it had a fair bit of oil on it. I am charging the battery to conduct another one later and see what happens. I'm guessing these results are not good especially number 2, but i still would have thought the car would have started. All leads and plugs are reconnected. Do i begin searching for a new head? (one for me and the car!)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
In reply to my last post, i conducted the cold compression test again removing all the spark plugs from the cylinders. My results were: Cyl 1# 140Psi Cyl 2# 115Psi Cyl 3# 150Psi Cyl 4# 150Psi. Again the no. 2 cylinder is well below the others. I have a feeling i have damaged an exhaust valve in that cylinder *sigh*. Any helpful tips of what i should do from here? Still dont know why it isnt starting even with these readings. Is there anyway i can boost the compression of that cylinder without removing the entire head, because that would be great haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I did some further investigation and i am not getting spark at any of the plugs which explains why it is not starting at all. I checked the ignition coil fuse which is fine and the battery is fully charged now. The leads are brand new and i only unpluged the air con compressor and nothing else. The belt for the alternator is still removed incase i have to remove the head. Could this be the cause?
 

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Even if you do get bent valves, just remove the head and put new valves in, very simple. You can do this all at home with some special tools.
 

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From reading your posts Thomo, it sounds to me that you bring it on yourself.

Maybe you should blame your mechanical skills, not the Honda! :(
 

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The odds are that the ignition coil (located inside the distributor) is shorted out, esp is you turned the motor over with the starter with the dist cap off or any spark plug wires disconnected while doing it. The coil can easily short out by doing that.

If you need to spin the engine with the starter with the spark plug wires disconnected (like when doing a compression test), disconnect the low voltage connector that goes to the distributor (right next to the distributor) or remove the ignition fuse first.

You can usually check the ignition coil with an ohm meter and if it is even slightly out of spec, replace it. Sometimes you can even see a gray or burnt mark on the side of the coil. They can be found online and can be other than Honda genuine coils.
It could also just be a fuse that feeds power to the distributor coil (maybe even the low voltage connector to the distributor is disconnected due to your working on the engine).
On a friend's 2000 CRV the ignition igniter (electronic points) went bad and it would not fire.
This was shortly after I had replaced his ignition coil. :(

I give you credit for doing the work you did, not the easiest thing to do.

Somewhere in this forum I gave a link on how to check the Honda Distributor Style Ignition System.
Get it running first, then worry about that possible bad valve problem.

If a valve is actually bent and that is causing the lower compression, I don't think there are any other ways to correct that problem without replacing and re-seating that valve and grinding the valve seat.
Get it running first.
Best of luck,
Buffalo4
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Glad you took the time to read my posts and offer some useful info Rickman. Not once did i blame honda, only myself. Thanks for the informative post Buffalo4, I actually tried to start the engine before conducting the compression test, so i dont believe i would have shorted anything. I will check the voltages going to the distributor and see if i can pin point the problem from there. I havnt shifted the timing on the distributor at all since buying the car, so it could very well be internal. I will do some more testing and repost my findings. I have replaced valve springs and removed valves on a head before umair, but i think on this one i will bite the bullet and get a pro to do it after/if i get it started.
 

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In reply to my last post, i conducted the cold compression test again removing all the spark plugs from the cylinders. My results were: Cyl 1# 140Psi Cyl 2# 115Psi Cyl 3# 150Psi Cyl 4# 150Psi. Again the no. 2 cylinder is well below the others. I have a feeling i have damaged an exhaust valve in that cylinder *sigh*. Any helpful tips of what i should do from here? Still dont know why it isnt starting even with these readings. Is there anyway i can boost the compression of that cylinder without removing the entire head, because that would be great haha.
See post 8. With the #2 spark plug out squirt some 30 weight oil into the cylinder (2oz). If the rings are at fault the compression will come up momentarily for a test (all plugs out). If it drops back down (especially if it starts and runs a few secounds) and then a test afterwards shows it low, it's rings. If the first test on #2 is still 115lb/si, then it may be a valve burnt or bent.
 
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