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2018 Honda CR-V EX-L Lunar Silver
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143 Posts
This build is looking great! Glad you're doing those brakes, not me. :)
 

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Small update. Still waiting on a few parts. I want to get everything on front end done at once.

Went ahead and got the new rear frame brace from Honda. Installed with the hrg 1" spacer for bar included in the kit.

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Flex bolts installed. Flexy.

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1320 stainless exhaust studs installed and a/c line insulated. A couple of the factory exhaust manifold bolts had worked loose already. I didn't go too tight on them because there wasn't much thread. These studs are a must. The discoloring on this brand new header is slightly concerning.

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Almost all parts here. Couple more goodies.

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Starting on rear wheel cylinders, brake lines, and stainless flex hoses. I will be doing a brake fluid "flush" at the same time and cleaning/adjusting shoes.
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Breaking the glaze on the drums and leaving a non directional finish with red resurfacing discs (cookies). I'm only using red because that's what I have in bulk. You can use the rougher cookies or sandpaper.
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Always get rid of the rust ridge that builds up on inside rear of drum that hangs out behind shoes.

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Cleaning up outside and going red.

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #64 ·
The spring over the brake shoe adjuster is a piss poor design. I have done multiple honda shoes and I don't remember any being like this. I suppose I could have blocked it from my memory. Generally you can just get the wheel cylinder out without any shoe spring disassembly. I decided to remove top spring to get wheel cylinder out easier. Wound up taking them completely apart.

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Pop the wheel cylinder off after removing bolts.
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Easiest way to flush brake fluid is to remove all fluid from the master cylinder and add new fluid first. Turkey baster does the trick.

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Took screen out of master cylinder and cleaned it with brake clean.

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Broke the glaze and resurfaced shoes with sand paper because they are like new and not saturated with brake fluid yet.

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I thought I was going to have to relocate brake line bracket on trailing arm, but the stainless flex hoses are slightly longer, which is perfect. They appear to rotate freely until tightened. I jacked up this side to make sure brake hoses move correctly and don't rub on anything.

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Adjusted rear shoes to have slight drag. You want to feel the shoes rubbing drums. If it wasn't awd you would want to be able to spin drum about one turn before shoes stop it free spinning.


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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Rear brakes gravity bled and then normally bled until fluid looked brand new and crystal clear on both sides. Patched the hole in left wheelwell. It's not structural or pretty, but you won't see it and it will keep water and everything else from flying off tire into it.

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Got a couple things in from Malaysia today.
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Funny how the rear bar looks like it goes up in pictures but it is actually completely flat. It curves forward. I believe you could mount it with the curve going toward the back if you wanted. Some trimming of the plastic around shock tower was necessary. Back is basically done. Have to get moog rear swaybar links. Waiting on a bigger rear swaybar that will get here who knows when.

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Front bar, chassis brace, and lightbar.

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My passenger-side rear wheelwell has that same rust hole that yours does, only worse. And it didn't have this when I stopped driving it, so it rusted away in the driveway. For all I know, things could be living in there now.

I need to have the whole mess towed away one of these days, since it's rusting to pieces and not worth fixing anymore. A shame since I had newer tires on it, and some newer front suspension components.
 
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2000 Honda CR-v 5-speed AWD
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78 Posts
Starting on rear wheel cylinders, brake lines, and stainless flex hoses. I will be doing a brake fluid "flush" at the same time and cleaning/adjusting shoes.




Breaking the glaze on the drums and leaving a non directional finish with red resurfacing discs (cookies). I'm only using red because that's what I have in bulk. You can use the rougher cookies or sandpaper.


Always get rid of the rust ridge that builds up on inside rear of drum that hangs out behind shoes.





Cleaning up outside and going red.

Can I just say that I love the fact that you call these cookies??? Im adopting this I swear. Also, clean build man! Keep up the good work!
 

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #69 · (Edited)
Wildcat that's a shame about your rotted away crv. I hate to see it. But they're always worth fixing.... usually lol.

Gopher I'm glad to add to your vocabulary. I can't remember who I heard call them cookies ages ago. One of the many old mechanics I learned from I imagine. There is a local tool store that sells bags of all varieties of the small and big cookies. Bag of 20 is 10 bucks I think. I'll find out soon because I'm out.

Starting on the front. Figured I'd do something a little cosmetic first. I really like how it turned out.

That SE chrome trim!

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Cut out the guts. The top has a dip for you to reach the hood release. So it looks funky and can throw you off cutting.

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I've never used my hot knife attachment for my little soldering iron/torch. It worked very well.

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I set the grill skeleton down on a piece of cardboard and made a rough template, then used it to cut out grill mesh. It's aluminum. I could actually cut the mesh with scissors!

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A couple of the bosses broke off the chrome trim piece when removing old screws, and of course they were the top ones that matter. At least they were at the same level. Didn't feel like waiting for epoxy to dry so I sent a couple stainless bolts straight through the front!

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I decided to go up and over top instead of going behind it. So on the top I used some of the foil tape I have so it is smooth where the hood seal sits and so it's when you're fishin around for the hood release. I cut the mesh ever so slightly too small in top driver side corner but you can't really see it. Especially on the car.

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Many of you thought SE stood for special edition. But my badging says otherwise!🤣
The finished grill product. Don't worry, this is just the beginning of the front. Muahaha!

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I have to redrill the inside of drivers side where I put the bolt. It has tweaked the chrome trim. Not a big deal.
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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #70 ·
The front fun has begun!
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3m headlight restoration kit, plus meguiars ultimate compound buff, and clearcoated with duplicolor 1k clear. Stage 1.

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Stages in between were finer sandpaper, wet sanding with the special 3m trizact pad, then buffing, then hand buffing with ultimate compound, and finally 3 coats of clear. In a week or two I'll probably wax them as well.

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The boxes in the headlights that the grill screws into are broken. They will be getting plastic welded. One is broke off, the other is cracked. I imagine this is common on these. I didn't even know until I took them out.

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Took off the front inner fenders to kilmat inside fenders and found a nightmare. Cutting, grinding, and por 15 inbound. I imagine this is a common rust spot on these. Passenger side is bad bad...

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Little trick when getting axle nuts off. Put a screwdriver through the rotor cooling fins.

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That's all for tonight. Getting married in a week so I need to bust some ass and get this thing done. Planning on taking it on a nice long honeymoon cruise to a few different places. A little later on. Still want it done this week. Rust on frame inside fenders is not something I planned on having to deal with...
 

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Congrats on the upcoming nuptials! :love:
 
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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #72 · (Edited)
Congrats on the upcoming nuptials! :love:
Thanks! I appreciate it.


Got rid of all the loose metal/rust. Ground it back a little. Could have cut it back some, but it is what it is. This will be a true test to see if this por15 stops it from spreading. I am very curious to see.

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I plan on cleaning up the wheelwells and spraying them like the back, so it will look better when finished.

Wrapping the header. Left a little area open at the slip joint. I don't think the megan racing lower frame brace is going to clear the exhaust without some modification so I don't think it will be going on right now.

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Went to the local pick n pull junk yard and got a valve cover for 11 bucks to get ready to slap on when I adjust the valves. There were a few there very corroded. I was lucky to find this one with bad paint, but not really corroded. Stripped it down.

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Sprayed it with the vht wrinkle paint. This is what it looked like initially. Sprayed it thick. Used an entire can on it. 3 coats.

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After a few hours there was no wrinkle. I used a hair dryer all over it and it curled up pretty quickly.This is what it looked like that night after the hair dryer. I was pretty worried... Very chunky!

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Then I let it sit out in the sun all the next day and it settled down and turned out pretty well. I have to clean off filler cap area, the ground area, and the honda letters. I'll sand where it bled into spark plug tube holes too, not that it matters. Not sure if I'll do anything else to it other than that.

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Turned out well enough that I may do my old one in the red wrinkle.
 

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I got front and rear wipers and a rear wiper arm. The spring was a little weak on the rear arm. The rear wiper is supposed to be 13" but the smallestsize offered in this style was 14". The paint has faded on the front wiper arms so I have to take them off and paint them before I slap the front wipers on.

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I slid the rubber blade down in the frame slightly and trimmed off the top of the rubber to stay flat on the glass.

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The dimple in the end of cv axle is where you are meant to drive it from. Never hammer on the end of an axle if it's stuck. You will mushroom the axle and you'll have to grind it down to get it through the hub.

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Now most people may not have a bolt on axle driver or air hammer, but if you are going to try to hammer out a stuck axle, make sure you use a punch or something in that dimple. Don't just smack the face of the axle. Don't hammer on the nut. All of these things will create more problems.

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If you leave the spring in place until after you remove the balljoints, it will actually help you when you are trying to shock the ball joints loose.

Do not use a pickle fork unless you are replacing the ball joint or tie rod end or the boot. A pickle fork will always destroy the grease dust boot. Always.

I like to shock the joints loose by hitting the lower control arm or the top of the knuckle where the joint is penetrating. Loosen the nuts until you can remove them by hand. Leave them on the end so that when the joint does break loose, the knuckle doesn't fly back and knock your teeth out, or do a multitude of other things. You will probably have to smack it pretty good. Not love taps.

This one has popped loose. Hit here.
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Coming along. Steering rack isn't leaking and the boots fit! Line over top of rack needs the clamps tightened. But this is good news.

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That's good news. Steering racks are.....not fun.
 
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2001 Crv SE
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Discussion Starter · #75 · (Edited)
That's good news. Steering racks are.....not fun.
They are usually not too bad. Some can be a pain though I agree.

I'm going to assume that the evaporator drain is on the passenger side and runs down where the swaybar bracket bolts up. When I replaced the front swaybar links with the cheapies last time, the bracket bolts broke and I had to drill and tap the holes. Glad to see when I took it apart they are holding up fine. I used stainless bolts.

Had to compress the spring to turn the tophat 90 degrees so the spacer studs line up.

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I marked the spring to know exactly where to turn it to. I prefer this spring compressor for home use. I like the u bolts completely around the spring.

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Obviously most people aren't going to have this tool. You don't need it or a ball joint press with a little ingenuity. But it sure makes these a breeze.


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Driving old ball joint out.

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Now here is the most important part. On any ball joint where the boot has to pass through the hole during installation, you must remove the boot. If you leave the boot on these balljoints during installation you will tear the boot. You may not even see it. The boot will get pinched between the ball joint and whatever it is sliding into. You work the band up, unraveling slightly, expanding it. Same goes for when you put it back on.

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These driving tools use a cup with a shoulder so you are pushing on the body of the ball joint. Never push with a balljoint press or hammer with a socket on the brass colored "cap" section of the balljoint.

The plate where the grease fitting normally is, is just that, a plate. If you drive it there you will mash it right into the cage of the balljoint or the ball itself and it will be ruined. If you hammer ball joints in on a honda(and i have many times so I would not fault you) make sure you use a socket that sits on the outside lip/body of the ball joint. That is where they are intended to be driven from.

I should have taken a picture of the cup on the install tool. It has a shoulder to make sure it's driving on the outside body of the ball joint and not the brass colored plate area of balljoint.

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Continued.
 

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2001 Crv SE
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217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #76 · (Edited)
New ball joint comes with a snap ring. I guess the factory ball joints don't have a snap ring. Work the retaining ring back on and that's how to not damage the boots during install. Looks like there is a small slit in the boot in this picture but it doesn't show up in any other picture and I just looked again really close and don't see it. I wiped it with a rag a few times. Must have been something on it. Or it's compressed closed and I didn't see it. Very strange. If it is slit, it could only be from the end of the clip. Just have to be very careful. It'll be alright. I'm not going to obsess over it or anything.........🤣

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With the lift on, the balljoints are at an extreme angle with the suspension hanging. Abs wire seems like it has enough slack. Not ideal but it's fine, it'snot as taut as it looks. In this lower resting position the spring is up against the body/frame. Not real fun. I was not able to get the shock to drop into fork so I assembled it and bolted the top in and worked the fork bolt into control arm last.

14.5 turns on tie rod in case you're wondering what's scribbled under brake line. Sprayed the knuckle where you can see it black. Didn't spend much time on that.

When I aligned this vehicle last time I set the front to zero camber. With the lift it is going to go positive so I marked where the ball joint was, and moved it in about 1/4 inch. It will definitely need an alignment and I won't be able to do my own alignment this time. Luckily I know an ol timer who I trust to do what I ask him. Plus I'll get a printout.

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New rack boot, outer tie rod, lower control arm, and endlink. I'm leaving end link loose on swaybar and leaving the swaybar unbolted until i get ready to put the other side on.

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I'm going to jack up under lower control arm some to simulate this side being loaded on the ground and tighten all the control arm bushing bolts. You can see the angle on the joints all the way extended with the lift.

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2000 Honda CR-v 5-speed AWD
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Lucky you! I went looking EVERYWHERE for that Matco honda/acura ball joint tool. Finally found a seller online. That and Luck you x2 because my RD1 is leaking power steering fluid from the rack like there is no tomorrow XD I need a new rack, AC pump, Rear main seal, Axle seal.... Yeah the work is starting to stack up haha. Keep up the amazing work! Its looking like its coming along nicely!
 

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They are usually not too bad. Some can be a pain though I agree.
I did the rack on a 2005 TSX last year in July, and there is not as much room to work as there is in a CR-V. And thankfully the impact made quick work of the subframe bolts--the corner of the subframe near the driver's side wheelwell needs to be dropped about two inches so the rack can be turned and removed. Being able to use a smaller impact and a few extensions from the top of the engine bay made removing some of those bolts much easier. If I'd have had to do this with a ratchet and hand tools, I'd have given up.
 
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Discussion Starter · #79 · (Edited)
I had the matco truck guy order the ball joint tool. Been years now. It has paid for itself, but sometimes it has trouble driving the new joints in. I've had a couple civics it would just not drive the joint in.

Addco 3/4" rear swaybar finally got here. Looks like they make them per order. I'm on the fence on this one. Seems like a good product but it definitely doesn't bolt right in. Bigger bar, bigger bushings, means bigger brackets so the holes don't line up. They account for this by including an adapter plate. But what good is one adapter plate? Both sides are bigger. You need two. So I had to make one. I also got the moog rear links.

It is basically 2 pieces of metal welded together with a recess where one of the original mounting bolts sits under the swaybar bushing.
Speaking of bolts, you need longer bolts all the way around. They included a few longer bolts in the kit but they aren't metric.... they also included generic instructions for any random swaybar. Nothing vehicle specific. This is the plate they sent.

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This is the plate I made
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The offset wider holes for bigger swaybar bracket moves the swaybar forward or back depending on which way you bolt the plate to crossmember. You have to move the bar back. Moving it forward causes it to hit the crossmember. You have to use a bolt to keep one aligned with bolt hole while you tighten the bolt in the recess of the plate. I had a bolt break on driver side and I had to drill and tap it. Luckily I had some 3/8 stainless allen head bolts that I ground down so they wouldn't stick out much into the swaybar bushing when it's installed.

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I put the one I made on passenger side.

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Exhaust is not clearing it. I ordered some extended rubber exhaust hangers. I have room over rear axle to lower exhaust. We'll just have to see how the exhaust sits after. May have to get it tweaked and i need to figure out a heat shield for bushing over exhaust.

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2001 Crv SE
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Discussion Starter · #80 · (Edited)
Also, about the rear swaybar. I'm no engineer, but it seems to me if you only had a bracket on one side of the swaybar, spacing only one side down, would be putting uneven tension on the swaybar. It would always be pulling up one side and pushing down the other slightly. I don't know. Just thinking. Wondering what they were thinking lol.

Got the front driver side wheel bearing in. Even with a wheel bearing tool they are not fun. Normally on the back of the knuckle you can get the tool on the outer race of the bearing to drive it out. You can't do that on this one. The rear lip on the knuckle completely covers the outer race, except for one small slot. Which is useless.

So I have extra axle nuts laying around. I put it on the back of the hub and smacked it out with a mini sledge hammer. I was beating on a cheap socket, but the axle nut sat right where I wanted for a good smack. I don't plan on reusing the axle nut, it was an extra so it's going in the bearing press kit to be used for same purpose in the future. Normally you would pull the hub out on car with a slide hammer. But my slide hammer is not here.

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Notched inner race and drove it off with air hammer. If you knick the hub while cutting it's not a big deal. Just make sure you file it down, sand smooth, and make sure nothing is protruding to catch inner race during install.
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Tried to drive out the outer race with bearing tool, but there is just not enough of the race exposed to catch. So it drove the guts out.

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I wound up heating the knuckle with a torch and driving the outer race out with my air hammer. I set the knuckle down on the big catch cup of the tool and it drove right out. Not before I heated the knuckle though. It didn't budge without heat. You can see in the picture here that you can't get to the back of the race with anything. It has already been driven down so you can see the gap between knuckle, but I don't see a good way to get this out other than this. There is only that little notch where you can see the back of the race.
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So getting the new bearing in is definitely easier than getting the old bearing out, but you still have to be very, very careful to make sure the bearing is being driven in straight to the knuckle. I've found that it is best to stick your bearing in the knuckle and hold your driving plate on the bearing and slightly tap it to get it started. Go around the bearing with a tape measure to see if you are sticking out too far and crooked. It is really hard to see if it is very slightly crooked. If you try to drive it in cocked at all, it will ruin the bearing. I know from past experience...😂 I also warmed the knuckle slightly with a torch. Not directly in the bore, just around it. I kept the bearing in its plastic bag it came in and put it in the freezer for an hour. Not necessary, but it went in nice and easy.

You never want to force anything during this install process. Feel the bearing before you put hub in. If you feel anything other than complete smoothness just take it out and get another bearing. You drive outer race to get bearing in knuckle and you support bearing behind inner race when driving hub into bearing. I can't stress how easy it is to damage these kinds of bearings if you're not driving or supporting them correctly. Just really have to pay attention to what you are doing.

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The bearing is also supposed to be installed with the black side(double lip seal) facing outward and the metal side (pack seal) toward the inside.

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Once you get the hub driven in, spin it by hand. If you feel anything, anything other than complete smoothness, get a new bearing.

The backing plate/dust shield is easy to get tweaked. Very common. Just have to bend it where it needs to be when you have the rotor on. You can hold the rotor on with a lug nut and tweak the dust shield where it needs to go before you go scraping it all over the rotor going down the road.


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All put together and feeling smooth. For now... it's a duralast bearing, not a national or timkin. I recommend the better bearings but I had this one, so it is what it is. I'll be sure to update if it fails prematurely.
 
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