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Without going into all the gory details, the deal is that while I was replacing the oil pressure sensor/switch, I spun it off and the threaded stem is stuck in the block. I also broke off an extraction bit in the hole, so it's not leaking oil. Mechanic wants $880 to drop the engine and drill it out. Engine has 250,000 miles.

And, of course, my VTEC isn't working because this sensor is part of the electronics that engages that system. So I can't go above around 3k RPM.

I have seen on some other Honda owners' sites that some people are bypassing this sensor by either grounding the sensor's wire, or splicing a couple wires (VTEC solenoid) that go to the ECU. Their diagrams seem to belong to an older OBD1 system.

I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience doing this? With a 2002 CR-V (or compatible)?

It's the girlfriend's car, and she's presently car-less. And she has a broken foot. So, any ideas or opinions would be oh so appreciated!
 

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For the sake of posterity, and in the case anyone else on the internet ever has this problem, I'll provide the answer:

Splicing the VTEC oil pressure switch wire (orange/yellow) to the VTEC solenoid wire (green/yellow) seems to be a valid workaround. The oil pressure switch has a single wire that either gets grounded by the switch, or not. The normal (no pressure/engine off) condition is closed, to ground. When the oil pressure reaches some minimum threshold (engine on/rev up to ??? rpm) the switch opens the circuit. The VTEC solenoid apparently does exactly this, and the timing must be close enough to mimic the pressure switch. There is more precise language for all of this, of course, but I don't know enough about electronics and circuits to use it.

PS: I don't recommend doing this. That oil pressure switch was a nice last-ditch mechanism that let us know she was dangerously low on oil. The engine is old and leaky, and I'm lazy and forgetful, and it's not a car I usually drive, so this was pretty important. I have a friend who thinks he can use his welder to get the old bits of plug out of that hole, so when we have time, that's what we'll do.
 

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If there is any part of the hole left not blocked by the extractor you might be able to tap a torx bit in and unscrew it.
 
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