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I have a CRV 2003 which has 128,500 miles and has always been well taken care of and serviced. Suddenly this summer it began to burn oil. There is no oil leak - it appears that the pistons are worn down. My Midas mechanic told me to trade it in as a engine rebuilt will cost $3,000. First I was shocked - I bought a Honda because of its long performance. I was not expecting this to happen at all. I can't afford a new car. And my CRV has new tires, new breaks, new alternator, new battery, new struts on the front on it and it still looks really good. I am burdened with student loans and so the thought of a car payment just sinks me. I've also read on other threads that oil consumption has been terrible problem with Honda accords and that Honda will not admit to it.

Is it worth it to rebuild the engine? Or bite the bullet and try to find an affordable new car?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
All synthetic I should say - not "high". and it is the brand Midas uses. I put two quarts of Mobile all synthetic in the car last saturday when I saw the oil was very low.
 

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don't be too quick to write it off as bad pistons. First, check or replace the PCV valve. Considering the mileage and your good service habits, it could also be the valve stem seals. They typically but not always show blue smoke out the tailpipe when started after sitting a while. Mine showed smoke only at high rpm. Visual inspection cant reveal this problem , the only way to tell is by changing them. It can be done (with difficulty) without removing the cylinder head. Be sure to use genuine Honda parts.

If you still have oil consumption after these are replaced, I would say bad piston rings. Going up to a 40 grade oil might buy you some time before you really have to do them.
 

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It might, or it might not. It would if the compression rings are not holding a seal. However, if only your oil control rings are bad and the compression rings are OK, a compression test won't help. In fact, a good compression test result might sway you to believe all rings are ok, including oil control rings which are not evaluated by the compression test..
 
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