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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up this '03 CRV AWD a few months ago. It has had a P1457 CEL that has been there since I purchased it and I am looking into getting it taken care of, because having a CEL bothers me. Otherwise it runs great 165K on it. Most of the info that I can find points to one of the vent solenoids being bad, and there is a good youtube on how to replace it but the rear diff on the AWD makes it pretty in accessible, and of course it could be leaking from somewhere else. (In the video it was a FWD) There is also a TSB on it. https://f01.justanswer.com/amedee/00e22c62-284b-4be6-aa6d-fd0e3af464ce_2009-06-22_221339_vent_solenoid.pdf

Anyhow I have called Honda and they said it would cost $75 for them to look at it before they could give me an estimate, and the local garage said it would cost $160 to smoke test it before they could give me a repair estimate. $160 seemed about $80 too high to me, so I was leaning towards the Honda dealer, but I am not sure if that $75 was just going to be them hooking it up to a code reader then giving me another quote for a smoke test. If they charge $75 to read a code that I already know, I am going to be quite unhappy.

I was wondering if anyone had this repair done at the dealer, or just in general knew Honda dealer policies for this type of work. OR even better can offer a trick to gain better access to that area.
 

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I had this on my 2002 CRV a few years back. It is probably the canister shut valve. My shut valve tested good electrically...my problem was corrosion of the metal that held it together. It was just leaking. It sits right next to the canister. I did it right in my garage, jacked up the left rear and set a jack stand for safety. I removed the canister as an assembly....as I remember it was like four bolts and unhooked the hoses. Got the valve from Napa and it was an OEM Denso....about $55.00.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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The Honda dealer's diagnostic tool can individually test all the valving in the evaporative system while applying vacuum, so it may be worth the money.

We had a similar intermittent issue on our Acura TL, and we finally had the dealer diagnose it. Couldn't tell which of the three evap valves (or pump) was malfunctioning.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I took it to the dealer to look at, they charged $75 to troubleshoot. They diagnosed it as a leak in the the evap system. (Well duh!) They recommended replacing both the evap canister and canister vent solenoid for $480. Looks like I can get those parts aftermarket for about $140 so I guess I will try it to do the repair, hopefully it is as easy removing the 4 bolts to take out the canister.
 

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Well, I took it to the dealer to look at, they charged $75 to troubleshoot. They diagnosed it as a leak in the the evap system. (Well duh!) They recommended replacing both the evap canister and canister vent solenoid for $480. Looks like I can get those parts aftermarket for about $140 so I guess I will try it to do the repair, hopefully it is as easy removing the 4 bolts to take out the canister.
Nytro97 is right usually the vent solenoid valve that rust out from the top where the 4 bolts sits & seals it. You can use soapy water to test it if it has a leak. But if you see rust , then just replace it. If you need a diagram I can give you a link on where to find it. Good luck. I hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nytro97 is right usually the vent solenoid valve that rust out from the top where the 4 bolts sits & seals it. You can use soapy water to test it if it has a leak. But if you see rust , then just replace it. If you need a diagram I can give you a link on where to find it. Good luck. I hope this helps.
A diagram would be great thanks.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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Well, I took it to the dealer to look at, they charged $75 to troubleshoot. They diagnosed it as a leak in the the evap system. (Well duh!)
That sux. Did they say the evap leak was coming from those areas specifically? Or at least verify that the other components of the system were good?
:Huh::censored:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is specifically what they said:

TESTED & INSPECTED & VERIFIED LEAK AT EVAP CANISTER,
RECOMMENDED CANISTER AND CANISTER VENT SOLENOID REPLACED AND RECHECK.

They also said it looked like the Purge Solenoid had already been replaced, so from what I gather the actual canister is probably bad and they are likely doing the solenoid as preventive maintenance. They also told me about 3 other issues they found that they quoted me on, so at that point felt irritated and didn't want to talk to them anymore.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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So go ahead, do it yourself. Its not that difficult a repair I think. You are still $$$ ahead even with the diagnosis charge.



Everything is in the area just left of the rear diff. :wrenchin2:

Post back with pictures. :Happy:




PS: Did you ever knowingly run over road debris, or high-center the V? That could have been the Death Knell for the canister.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The code was there when I bought it so it wasn't anything I did. I'll update the thread after I work on it. Probably even take a few pics for the next guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I did the repair yesterday it was not too bad. I found it a little difficult to get the new canister aligned with the mounting brackets. I think they bent a little as the canister was hanging partially removed. It was cold I was trying to get it done before the the forecasted snow came, so I didn't take pictures under the car. However since I did not reuse the old canister I think these pics of the old one may help the next person.

Jack up the rear and put on tall jack stands. Remove the skid plate which is 3 10mm bolts, 2 on the front 1 on the rear. Remove the 3 bolts 12mm bolts holding the canister. The 2 at the rear of the canister are easily accessible with the socket wrench. The one in front which is near the electrical connector is a more of a pain, you may be able to slide a socket with extension in to get to it but I didn't seem to have quite enough maneuver room with my tools. I could get a wrench on it from the front too but the bolt was pretty tight and because the wrench could only move a few degrees I could not get much torque on it.

What I ended up doing was removing the bolts for the carrier and that allowed it to drop down, but still hung in place by the various hoses that were still clipped into the carrier. The carrier was either 2 or 3 10mm bolts and were easily accessible with the socket with a long extension. Once it was dropped down a little I could get out the front bolt and take the canister out. But before I could do so I spent a good 10-15 minutes trying to figure out how to remove the one 90 degree fitting. The fitting has a pinch area, that you have to squeeze on both sides. This was not very apparent to me as amateur mechanic but once I figured it out it came off fairly easy. The other 3 hoses just pull off. The electrical connector slides off by squeezing down the front tab.

Reassembly was basically the reverse. I still had the carrier hanging down and I started the tough front bolt on the canister first. I then started one of the rear bolts to secure it to the carrier better, and snugged up the front bolt at this time because once the carrier mounted it would be hard to get at. Put the 3 bolt in and snug up the 2 rear bolts.

Put the 10mm bolts bolts for the carrier back in place and slide on your hoses and electric connector. That one fitting has to be pinched again to slide back on. Put the skid plat back on with the 3 10mm bolts.

I replaced the entire canister and valve. I have a feeling the canister was fine and the rusty valve was the issue but I didn't want to do this twice so I did both, which made it a little easier since I didn't have to remove the horribly rusted screws. The canister was $120 on eBay and was a genuine Honda part. The valve was $40 from RockAuto. Neither the canister or valve came with the bolts to attach it and the ones on the car were rusted so I had to find a few in the garage luckily I had some. As you can see from the pics if the rusty valve was not the problem it probably would be soon. I think the repair took me about 2-1/2 hours but I am slow. Hopefully it worked, it is hard to tell because it takes a few days and engine cycles for the system to decide to throw a code. IMG_1505.JPG
IMG_1506.JPG IMG_1507.JPG
 

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Yep, This is a good refresher for when I did it, The screws and valve on mine looked as rusty as yours. I used Vice Grips to remove the screws (and maybe a little heat). As I remember I could suck on the valve and hear and feel it leak by when I had it off the canister.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks Tom, your telling me to remove the canister pointed me in the right direction. Much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Replaced the other vent module today, the one not mounted on the canister (part # on the diagram 17380-S5A-A32) well actually my mechanic did it, I had it in the shop because the passenger rear caliper was binding and I didn't think I would have time to take care of it before the bad weather hit. The mechanic confirmed that the module was bad and needed to be replaced, so hopefully that will be the last piece.
 
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