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Hello!

To make a long story short, my 2006 CRV with 163k miles is giving me trouble.

Went out yesterday, as I was pulling into a parking space, the car stalled. Tried to start car, and it turns over, and catches as if it's starting, but doesn't start. Battery is fine. My initial thought was fuel pump, filter, clogged line, spark plugs, something in that direction.

Have it towed to my mechanic, who I trust completely. He checks all of the above, and they are fine. Start checking out engine. Compression test is slightly low, and oil is slightly low. He said it looks like timing chain skipped, and it needs to be replaced. Their facility doesn't do timing chains. Call all over the city, and keep hearing "dealer only."

Call dealer, tow the car over. Service guy calls and says the timing chain caused a lot of damage, and engine needs to be replaced.

I am NOT a mechanic. I grew up in a car family. My grandfather was a mechanic and owned a garage, my dad was a backyard mechanic. So essentially, I have an awareness or cars, but no detailed knowledge.

I ask what kind of damage there is, and don't get a straight answer. I'm not saying there isn't damage, but what damage? How? Bent piston? I guess I'm just trying to figure out my best course of action. I called back my regular mechanic, and he feels that replacing the timing chain is a big job and they can make more money by replacing the engine, for a similar amount of work. Honda quoted me about $1000 for the timing chain, but they want $3500 (parts and labor) to replace the engine. My mechanic feels like I could get it done for less somewhere else.

Thoughts?
 

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Thanks. I actually did, and they're about 30 miles from where my car is at the dealer. It would mean paying for another tow, paying for him to check it out (which he would deduct from any work).

I'm trying to find the cost-effective balance here. I've already paid my own mechanic $150 to check it out, as well as new plugs and topping off the oil. Then $75 to tow to the dealer.$150 to the dealer to check it out (deducted if I have work done).

If I take it to the independent Honda guy, who did say that a jumped timing chain can cause engine damage, then I'm paying $100 for a tow, and $100 for him to check it out.

Honda gave me a loaner car with 5k miles on, and told me if I have the work done there, I can keep it with unlimited miles until my car is done. They'll also give me 12 months/12,000 on the remanufactured engine, which had 80,000 on it.

My car has NO other issues, so I definitely want to keep it. I'm just trying to figure out if it's worth it to spend $500 to get a second option (tow, diagnostic fee, and rental car), or if I should get the engine and know I'm good for another 100,000.

Thanks.
 

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If the timing chain skipped then yes there could be severe damage. For example once the timing chain jumped your pistons could then start hitting your valves causing major damage. IMO it’s not worth the extra money for a 3rd opinion. Get the new engine installed. Google interference engine to educate yourself and understand what the mechanics are telling you.
 

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Hi, and thank you.

I appreciate you suggestion, and actually read about and watched some youtube videos on interference engines this morning (something I had NEVER heard about today).

I certainly agree that it can cause serious damage. I was slightly concerned that he couldn't tell me what the damage actually was. The independent Honda mechanic, who admittedly did not see the car, said that damage was absolutely possible, but not definite, based on the fact that the chain did not break, my check engine light never came on, I still have some compression, I had no loud bangs, etc. That is one of the reasons I was considering a 2nd opinion. 1000 job vs 3500 job. In addition, even with all of the research I've done on engines, etc, I can barely find any information regarding engine damage related to timing chains, only belts, when the teeth come off, or when they break. So, that's all. I was just trying to gain some further clarification and knowledge. Thank you for taking the time to respond.

I tend to agree though, that $3500 for an engine that will take me at least another 100,000, especially when the rest of the car is mint, is the best option at this point.
 

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I also own an '06 CR-V, with 138.6k miles on it. Bought it new, and still really like it. If I had the same issue you did I'd first try to determine if my present engine was damaged. I would think they could do this for a reasonable fee. I would be hesitant to replace the engine merely because of the possiblility it was damaged. Be aware that for $3500 you're probably getting a rebuilt engine, which may be the best fix, if the engine was rebuilt and installed properly, and then again it may not.
 

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A leak down test should be performed to determine if any valves are bent. The absence of any bent valves means the engine is ok. I have had two failed timing chains in my 2003, neither time was there any engine damage.
 

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Hello!

To make a long story short, my 2006 CRV with 163k miles is giving me trouble.
Twelve years and 163k miles on the poorly maintained car is already a good reason to rebuild the engine. A chain will wear only when oil was not replaced in time or there was a problem with the air filter.

I recommend to do it at dealership and enjoy your car for many more years.
 
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