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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone.

I decide to change the transmission fluid in my 07 CR-V AWD for the first time after doing some research.

Everything went well it's just I drained about 3.5L of fluid when the service manual states that I should only get 2.5L.

I filled it up and ensure that the fluid is between the two marks on the dip stick. (see picture). It is between the two marks when the engine is warm or cold.

I check my friend's CRV 07 AWD and his just touches the dipstick(doesn't hit the bottom mark on the dipstick) when the engine is cold.

Do you guys think my level is correct? Did I overfill it? Are there any issues with it being overfilled?

Thanks!

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As long as you measured what came out and replaced it with the same amount, you can't go wrong. Sounds good. Use DW-1?
What did the old fluid look like? Mileage it was used for?
 

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I didn't measure it exactly. I just filled it until I hit the mark on the dipstick. 135,000 KM. The fluid was a bit darker than the new one. I think it's the DW-1.

I guess the question is: Should it be between the two dots when the engine is cold / warm? My friend's does not hit the bottom when it's cold.
 

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The owner's manual indicates checking the level when the CRV is on level ground with engine shut off after one minute. The level should be between the marks. Sounds like your good.
 

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I can't figure out where to post a question. Maybe someone can help me out. My question is: I am going to try and replace atf fluid on my 2007 crv. I've been doing some research. Should I drive the car to heat up the fluid before draining?
 

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I can't figure out where to post a question. Maybe someone can help me out. My question is: I am going to try and replace atf fluid on my 2007 crv. I've been doing some research. Should I drive the car to heat up the fluid before draining?
Yes, and then be careful when trying to break the nut free the first time.
 

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I also have a 2007 CRV and I am about to change mine for the first time. Has anyone pulled the transmission cooler line to flush out the converter while changing the fluid? I am curious to know which is the outlet and inlet lines. Thanks for the help. :)
 

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I also have a 2007 CRV and I am about to change mine for the first time. Has anyone pulled the transmission cooler line to flush out the converter while changing the fluid? I am curious to know which is the outlet and inlet lines. Thanks for the help. :)
You should look at the sticky note at the top of this forum. You'll see that Honda specifically recommends NOT using any form of flushing system.

And Google around for people's experience with power flushes. You'll find lots of bad reports. I have one to share as well... I took in my Silverado to my local shop for some maintenance. I ask them to only drop the pan, clean it out, put the pan back and refill the fluid. They tried to sell me on a flush, but I said no and that it would cause more problems than it solves. Of course, they gave me the standard lines of "we do it all the time", etc.. The tranny was fine before I took it in. When I pick it up, it seems the tech didn't read my instructions and hooked it up to the power flush. While they didn't charge me for that, the transmission now shifts VERY rough. The stupid flusher pushed all sorts of grime [that was happy sitting at the bottom] into various valves, etc. I'm about to try some Lucas product that might help. If it gets much worse, I'll need some transmission work.
 

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You should look at the sticky note at the top of this forum. You'll see that Honda specifically recommends NOT using any form of flushing system.

And Google around for people's experience with power flushes. You'll find lots of bad reports. I have one to share as well... I took in my Silverado to my local shop for some maintenance. I ask them to only drop the pan, clean it out, put the pan back and refill the fluid. They tried to sell me on a flush, but I said no and that it would cause more problems than it solves. Of course, they gave me the standard lines of "we do it all the time", etc.. The tranny was fine before I took it in. When I pick it up, it seems the tech didn't read my instructions and hooked it up to the power flush. While they didn't charge me for that, the transmission now shifts VERY rough. The stupid flusher pushed all sorts of grime [that was happy sitting at the bottom] into various valves, etc. I'm about to try some Lucas product that might help. If it gets much worse, I'll need some transmission work.
Sorry about your Silverado. I know when I was a mechanic years ago that we never flushed GM transmissions because the huge amount of solvent in the new fluid would eat the adhesive in the clutch packs. I hadn't received my service manual yet so I wasn't sure if Honda had the same problems. Thanks for the info before I messed it up!
 

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me to looking for the same answer. .who around here changes the atf fliter? its 30$ from honda.
I changed the ATF filter on my 07 CRV. It was fairly easy. I removed the plastic panel underneath (I think it was 2 bolts and 4 or 6 clips) for easy access to the filter.

H&A Accessories sell them for about $18 before tax & shipping :)
 

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Check this thread on how I changed my ATF & filter at the same time. http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/19-maintenance-service/14618-transmission-fluid-exchange.html

This way, all of the fluid throughout the transmission & converter gets replaced. Always best to have help when doing this in case you can't pour in the new fluid as fast as the old fluid gets pumped out.

Also, go back & read the first posting about transmission fluid changes as written by Black Pearl. Post #1 & Post #16 should provide all the info you need about how to do this procedure.

Good luck.
 

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I realize I am commenting on an old post, but thought I would try to get a response before starting a fresh thread on transmission fluid flush.

I just purchased a 2007 Honda CR-V EX-L and when I purchase a used vehicle I always do a transmission fluid "flush" so that I know the last time it was done. (same with oil and power steering and brake fluid).

The way I usually do the transmission flush is as follows:
1) Drain fluid
2) Fill with an equal amount of new fluid
3) Run vehicle for 1 minute ( run through each gear - reverse, drive, neutral, 2, 1)
4) Repeat steps 1-3 two to three more times until I see the fresh fluid drain out then fill it one final time to the correct level.

I figure this method gets me to about a 98-99% replacement.

My question:

I read somewhere (can't remember if it was on this forum or another one) to do the drain and fill X 3 but to drive 100 miles between each drain and fill so as not to "shock" the transmission. Logically this makes no sense to me..you are putting in a fresher fluid so why would that shock the transmission? Will my method work or do I really need to drive 100 miles between each drain and fill?
 

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Not driving the car between fluid changes does nothing to remove the many quarts held in the torque converter. 100 miles is overkill, but it's better than just starting the engine and letting it idle.

To truly mix old and new, you need to use all gears in the transmission, including reverse.
 

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Not driving the car between fluid changes does nothing to remove the many quarts held in the torque converter. 100 miles is overkill, but it's better than just starting the engine and letting it idle.

To truly mix old and new, you need to use all gears in the transmission, including reverse.
Thanks for the response.

I apologize for not including in my original post that when I am running the car for one minute I am putting it into reverse, drive, neutral, 2, and 1 which takes about one minute. I have edited my original post to reflect that.

This is the part I am struggling with - why do I need to mix old with new?

If I do the first drain and fill, then start the car, run it through reverse, neutral, drive, 2, and 1 (about one minute total time) that should pull the new fluid out of the drain reservoir and put old fluid into the drain reservoir. Then repeat until I have replaced most of the old fluid. I realize I am not going to get 100% of the old but I think I get a 98% swap with this method including the old fluid that resides in the torque converter.

I am not a mechanic so I may be missing something which is why I am here. :)
 

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Just shifting it through the gears isn't enough. Take it for a short drive going fast enough so it shifts through all the gears, then do another drain and fill. Repeat until you're comfortable with the color of the fluid you drain out.
 

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run it through reverse, neutral, drive, 2, and 1 (about one minute total time)
2 and 1 on the transmission aren't really gears. They lock the transmission in to those gears; i.e. if you put it in 2, it will never go to 1st, 3rd, 4th or 5th gears. (Useful for launching the car from a stop on icy roads.)

As racoon said above, a short drive going through all 5 forward gears and reverse is necessary.

his is the part I am struggling with - why do I need to mix old with new?
Because if the torque converter isn't exercised, a lot of the old fluid will remain in it, and when you drain the transmission, you're effectively draining new or almost-new fluid and replacing it with new fluid. At least that's how I understand it.
 

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Thanks for the response.

I apologize for not including in my original post that when I am running the car for one minute I am putting it into reverse, drive, neutral, 2, and 1 which takes about one minute. I have edited my original post to reflect that.

This is the part I am struggling with - why do I need to mix old with new?

If I do the first drain and fill, then start the car, run it through reverse, neutral, drive, 2, and 1 (about one minute total time) that should pull the new fluid out of the drain reservoir and put old fluid into the drain reservoir. Then repeat until I have replaced most of the old fluid. I realize I am not going to get 100% of the old but I think I get a 98% swap with this method including the old fluid that resides in the torque converter.

I am not a mechanic so I may be missing something which is why I am here. :)
If you don't drive the CRV on the road and let it get into TC lockup (overdrive) the old fluid in the torque converter just stays in there. I think it is over a qt.
So, doing it your way is not getting the old and new fluid mixed up. You need to mix the old with the new to have mostly new fluid sooner.
Always check the fluid level on the dipstick to make sure it is OK. If the fluid was real low or extra high and you just replace what drained out, you will only get it to the level it was before you drained it. Might be right or might be very wrong.

Driving it even 100+ miles between changes lets the additives slowly remove the varnish, etc buildup and lessens the chance of bigger 'clumps' coming loose due to almost all fresh fluid, or so it is said.

Even doing it with driving in between changes and getting into TC lockup and also reverse, you will still not get to over 90% new fluid with 4 drain and fills, probably closer to 85%.
On the 2007 CRV:
2WD--2.7qts for a drain--Total capacity: 7.4 qts---single drain and fill gives you 36.5% new fluid (2.7/7.4)
4WD--2.6qts for a drain--Total capacity: 7.6 qts---single drain and fill gives you 34.2% new fluid (2.6/7.6)
So, if the fluid is REAL dirty, I would recommend to do a drain and fill and a drive around 10 miles or so and getting into TC lockup and also R (not while moving forward of course :eek: ) :) and then do another drain and fill.
If the fluid is looking decent drive 50-100 miles or so and do the third one. If the fluid is looking good, drive at least another 100 miles and do the 4th one. If the fluid was not bad looking or no burnt smell, 3 drain and fills should do nicely and then do a single drain and fill around every 30k miles or so.
I would sure recommend that you put on a new crush washer on the drain plug after the final drain.\
Also, I agree with ms3224a's statement.
Buffalo4
PS: Use DW-1 fluid or another high quality compatible ATF such as Valvoline MaxLIfe Dex/Merc ATF etc.
PPS: No, I am not a certified mechanic, Honda or otherwise.
 

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Thank you everyone for the replies. Very helpful in understanding why I need to drive and mix as I assumed putting it in gear pushed all the old fluid out. I was hoping for 95% new but if 85% is the best I can do I will have to settle for that. :)

The transmission fluid does not look bad at all. It is pink with black specs mixed in so I think it had a recent fluid drain and fill. I also have a copy of the carfax and it shows a Honda dealer doing the 5,000, 10,000, 30,000, 60,000 and 90,000 mile recommended maintenance which is a good thing. Even so, I am going to do 3 drain and fill...I drive about 100 miles a week so I will just do them a week apart instead of in the same afternoon.

Occasionally the transmission feels like it sticks for a second and then goes to the next gear. This happens when I go from a stop to start like at a stop sign or stop light. I am hoping if I do three drain and fills it will smooth that out.

Buffalo4 - I have seen your other posts on transmission fluid changes so I already purchased 3 gallons of Valvoline Maxlife. I have also purchased 10 crush washers to use each time I replace the fluid. After the third drain and fill I am also going to replace the inline filter with a Honda OEM.

Thanks again for setting me straight.
 
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