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Discussion Starter #1
For such a small question, I don't seem to see consistent answers :)

In this thread for gen 2: http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/80-diy-center/8631-diy-adjusting-valves-2nd-gen-cr-v-2002-2004-maybe-06-a.html, I see this warning:
"ONLY ROTATE IN A CLOCKWISE DIRECTION, OTHERWISE the chain may come off. "

Yet in this thread for gen 1: http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/22-under-hood-performance/1315-diy-valve-adjustment.html, I see:
ONLY TURN THE ENGINE OVER COUNTER-CLOCKWISE! If not, you risk jumping the timing belt a tooth or two which would be bad!

Technically I'm not even sure which direction is clockwise or counter clockwise, since that will depend on you looking at the engine from driver side or passenger side. But assuming we're talking about the view when looking at the crankshalf turning nut, then either the 2 generations have totally opposite rotational direction, or one of those two gurus made a mistake in their warning :)

So which one direction is the right one?
 

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Sorry but if this needs to be asked then its not a job you should be doing yourself. Chances of mistakes are astronomically high and repair costs are extremely high.

Its no disrespect but you should not be adjusting valves when you have had no proper training. One mistake and your stranded somewhere with needing the top of the motor tore apart to replace valves.

That said, why someone would bring gen 1 into the question is something that shows not having experience working in engines. Completely different engine. Completely different design and lay out. Never use a timing belt based engine for any reference on how a timing chain system operates.

Engines are always turned in the direction that the tensioner is given the slack in the chain/belt and the chain/belt pull between the crank and cam is on the opposite side from the tensioner.

But once timing chain or belt is properly tensioned slow rotation by hand the opposite direction hurts absolutely nothing. It is good practice to only turn engine in the direction of the direction the engine rotates when running.

All engines operate the exact same way basically. Take the time to research how to do such tasks not just on Hondas but across all manufacturers so you fully understand the task and understand how things work so you dont have any mistakes.

This is why I wont give the simple answer, there is so much more to it and reading a couple forum posts then trying is the fastest way to end up with a dead engine.

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