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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 2010 CR-V 2.2CDTI automatic second-hand last week. The previous owner, who's a friend, mentioned he'd had a clean DPF warning before the controle technique (French version of an MOT), which he'd cleared with a blast and some injector cleaner. This reappeared on my test drive, but I wasn't too concerned. However, when I got it, the first thing I did was put a litre of DPF cleaner in the tank and give her a blast to Bordeaux, which cleared the DPF clean warning.

However, five days later it was back again. I'd also noticed that the fuel economy wasn't as good as the manufacture suggested (averaging about 8.2l/100km). So this morning I plugged in an ODB2 reader and got the following messages.

  • Mass air flow (MAF) sensor/volume air flow (VAF) sensor low input
  • Intake air temperature (IAT) sensor -high input
  • Manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor/barometric pressure (BARO) sensor -high input
  • Throttle actuator control (TAC) motor - open circuit
  • Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor -high input
  • Intake air temperature (IAT) sensor 2 -circuit high input
  • Fuel temperature sensor A -high input
  • Turbocharger (TC) boost control position sensor - circuit low
  • Throttle position (TP) sensor A/accelerator pedal position (APP) sensor A -high input
It seems an awful lot of sensors to go wrong independently and apparently shorts to either posiive or earth are common reasons for almost all of them. I was just wondering if there was anywhere in particular that is a likely culprit to cause all of this?

Thanks in advance.
 

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The OBD readout should also tell you which control module is reporting the error. It may be a bad ground or something like that for the module.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The OBD readout should also tell you which control module is reporting the error. It may be a bad ground or something like that for the module.
It's a really cheap reader to be honest. It just gave me P codes which I looked up online.

P0102, P0113, P0108, P2100, P0118, P0098, P0183, P2564, P0123. Can the same error potentially by reported by more than one module?
 

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I'm not too familiar with Honda reports as mine's been good enough for me not to plug anything in.

A sample of a report from Ford is pretty descriptive, it shows every module polled for diagnostics:

===PCM DTC P0128:00-6C===
Code: P0128 - Coolant Thermostat (Coolant Temp Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature)
Status:
  • DTC Maturing - Intermittent at Time of Request
  • Malfunction Indicator Lamp is Off for this DTC
  • Test not complete

Module: Powertrain Control Module
===END PCM===

===OBDII DTC ===
Successful DTC reading, no error codes found

Module: On Board Diagnostic II
===END OBDII===

===SASM DTC ===
Successful DTC reading, no error codes found
Module: Steering Angle Sensor Module
===END SASM===

===ABS DTC ===
Successful DTC reading, no error codes found
Module: Antilock braking system
===END ABS===
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, in the end, I bought a 20 euro can of Mass Air Flow cleaner, took the MAF out and sprayed it, let it dry, and put it back in.

Did a bit of Italian tuning until the DPF cleaning light went and then drove normally, with fuel economy on these twisty roads gone from about 8.2l/100km to 6.7l/100km after the clean. It appears that if the MAF is giving garbage values then the engine totally mucks up the mix and all the other sensors go haywire as well.

I've ordered a Bluedriver OBD2 scanner so will see what the computer thinks about everything in a few days.

Very chuffed that my fears of 1000 euros on a DPF have been reduced to a 20 euro spray can. Thank you all for your input. :)
 
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