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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The 2010 Honda CR-V has an intermittent leak above and to the right when viewed from the bottom which I believe is the oil pressure switch. Beside the switch I see some oil stain. I believe this is from the accessory belt.

Is this switch capable of intermittent leaks. I see this when the motor was under higher rpm. It’s not happening when the motor is hit off.

Since it apparently the source how have forum members replace it. It seems the approach from the bottom is the only way. Does this get torqued to a certain spec or goodntight?

Thanks.


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Edit: forgot to add the picture, it did not upload

IMG_7042.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you know the torque settings. Also is it easier to approach from under the car. On the cold engine better than the warm engine?


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It's better from underneath with a cold engine. Sorry I don't have the proper torque spec handy. Be sure you use high quality oil pressure switch or OEM part.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Replaced the oil switch. At first I did not remove the passenger front wheel but I recommend removing it for space as it’s cramped.

I initially used a 24 mm 2 inch deep well with an adapter to a 3/8” and this was too big. I ended up with a 24 mm wrench and was able to get the switch off. The picture shows where the permatex failed and the leak occurred.

Installation is straightforward. Apply permatex to the switch. Clean the cold engine out to remove the old permatex. I used isopropanol as I prefer the no residue from the cleaner. Hand tighten to avoid cross threading. Tighten to wrist tight or 13 ft lbs. connect wire and place boot over.

As I was doing this I saw the struts boots are completely torn. Is the only way to get the new boots are new struts? IMG_7045.jpg IMG_7052.jpg IMG_7050.jpg


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I believe you can order new strut boots from Rock Auto. But it's a lot of work since you have to disassemble the strut assembly to get to the boots, which means using a spring compressor (which can be unsafe to use). Then, having to get an alignment done. It's almost worth replacing the entire strut assembly if that's the case, as you would have to repeat the same work to get the old struts out, and also need an alignment when it's done.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks that make sense. Any brand from Rockauto you would recommend? Honda ones are about $310 online for one assembly.


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KYB gets a lot of recommendations, but I don't know if they have the complete assemblies for the CR-V available yet. When I looked last summer, only one of the four were available, and I had to use the Monroe QuickStruts for both of our '09s. The Monroe struts themselves have been fine, but already the front hardware is rattling after less than a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you. I see some from 1aauto and oredy. I will look at Monroe too. Will check on the KYB and see if they are available.

I wonder if the struts are made by third party companies. The OEM rear bearing I replaced for example is an NtN bearing assembly. On the ones you removed did you see any embossed company names on the struts?


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The Monroe QuickStruts are made here in Michigan at their factory in Monroe. (Monroe's cheaper struts are made overseas.) KYB, the same--genuine. But there are a lot of off-brand cheaper struts out there which sell for a lot less. Some well known manufacturers like Gabriel don't seem to have much available.

NTN is one of the good bearing manufacturers, as are NSK, SKF, Koyo, Nachi, FAG, Timken, etc. Same situation, though, with the off-brand bearings--they are made of poor quality bearing steel which micro-fractures and spalls quickly, and don't last long at all. The good manufacturers out there use Torrington bearing steel.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
KYB SR4233 and SR4234 $125 at Rockauto. $250 for both with a rebate available.

Going to try and keep these on till the deteriorate.


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I would not replace struts just because the boots are torn, if your suspension is working OK otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That’s my thought based on cost and the current ride. Would there be apart from the bounce test anything else I need to watch out for in case of the struts deterioration?


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Naaa, maybe noise if they are clunking around. Even then you could probably just cut them off.


If you don't drive in sand or gravel roads you are probably safe...40 years ago those boots were never fitted to shocks...
 
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