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Discussion Starter #1
Need to determine if the following situation is normal for the 2012 CR-V EX-L climate control system which I purchased from you back in April:

The car sits in the parking lot all day and gets the direct sun which heats up the interior. I use a sunscreen to cover the windshield which helps some.

When I leave work, I open the front windows and sunroof to allow the warm air to exit car. At the same time, I turn on the A/C using the Auto setting. By turning on the A/C it also turns on the recirculate mode which I know is normal. I have the temp set at 70 degrees.

Once the car interior starts to get cooled off, I shut all the windows and sunroof. However, the recirculate mode does not shut off automatically when the interior reaches 70 degrees. I have to either turn the temp way up before it shuts down, and then only temporarily. To get turn off the recirculation, I have to do that manually or turn off the Auto mode. Either way, the recirculation mode does not shut off automatically.

By way of comparison, I also have a 2003 Odyssey and when I do the same as above, with the exception of turning on the rear climate control mode, once the interior reaches the temp set, say 70 degrees, the recirculation mode shuts off automatically.

In the CR-V, is this normal or does something need to be tweaked? I looked in the Owner's manual and online and did not find anything to answer my question.
 

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I thought my 16 EX-L did the same thing for a while. However, I found if I leave it alone, it eventually goes out of recirculation mode unless I leave in Econ mode. It seems to stay in recirculate in Econ mode but not in normal mode.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I asked the Service Mgr at the dealership I bought my car from and he said that Honda made a design change because it was determined that there is less wear & tear on the A/C when left in the recirc mode. Yet if I manually turn it off, there is no problem. Go figure. I may write to Honda (there is no email listed on the Honda website) and get their opinion. Not that I don't trust what was said to me, but I want to be sure. Just seems odd that my Odyssey will shut off, but the CRV doesn't. If and when I get a reply, I'll try to remember to post it.
 

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This will apply to ANY make with AC. In the recirculate mode, it circulates the air in the car, therefore you are SUCKING hot outside air into your car from windows/roof. In this EXTREME heat we are having, it works faster to close the windows/roof and run the AC on high recirculate to start the cooling process for a few minutes. Once it starts to cool down, change it OUT of recirculate mode, which will bring fresh air into the car. By this time the fresh warmer from the outside has to flow across your EVAPERATOR which is ice cold and making temperature change take place. I know you think this is backwards, but try it, you will see a change. We spent over 5 hrs. today @ yard sales, never turning the Chevy Tahoe off, in 97 degree's, the inside temp was between 41/44 degrees, cooler in the NON RECIRCULATE MODE. JMHO and good luck. FYI, My CRV is a couple of degrees less because it is smaller.
 

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Re-cir mode does not suck outside air in, when the vehicle is not moving. It recirculates the air inside the vehicle. It takes air from the inside the vehicle and directs it through the evaporator and expels it through the ac vents (almost a closed system). It's intake air is neat the passenger foot area, in most cases.

The inside temp of a hot car is , let's say, 120F. On re-circ, you are now putting 120F air through your evaporator. Let's say it causes a 30F temp drop, now the air coming out of the vents is 90F. The outside air temp is 90F.
Same scenario, only this time the AC is set on outside air. Now the air you are directing through the evaporator is 90F. With a temp drop of 30F, the temp coming out of the vents is 60F.
But, pretty soon, the temp inside your vehicle gets below 90F (the temp of the outside air) so now having the AC set to recirculate will let the below 90F air in the vehicle go through the evaporator resulting in even cooler air coming out of the vents.

Having it on outside air pushes hot air out of the vehicle, so that can help initially.
Opening windows, etc during initial startup (assuming you are first entering the hot vehicle) of the AC will let more of the initial hot (120F) air out of the vehicle and it will be even more effective if the AC is set to outside air initially because it forces some of that hot (120F) air out of the vehicle.

Then again, the air flow inside a vehicle is different in re-cir mode than it is in outside air mode. I think in a CRV, the inside air exhausts through vents in the rear of the vehicle so air comes out the AC vents in front and goes through the CRV and exits though the rear vents, in the outside air mode. In re-cir mode, the air comes out of the same front vents and the inside air gets sucked into the low intake near the floor in front by the passenger side.

Having a CLEAN cabin air filter can really help out the whole cooling process also, as it allows more air flow through the evaporator

You actually left your Tahoe running for 5 hrs with the AC on while at yard sales? I guess you were going from yard sale to yard sale and weren't at one sale for 5 hrs. :) Re-cir should have kept the Tahoe cooler or at the same temp with less compressor use, but, what ever works. If you had an animal in the vehicle, having it on outside air would be better in case of a small exhaust leak, etc.

But, what ever works the best for your needs.

Buffalo4
 

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:)Quite a few yard sales and a lot of driving as well as lunch was on the menu in the 5 hrs, just easier to let it run. My two cars are a little different in size, the V is easier to cool off, JMHO.
David g.
 
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