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So, after 6 years and nearly 80,000 miles, I've worn out the driver's seat movable armrest. I thought it was just dirty, but apparently, I've not only worn the color off but also the finish. I found the part I need, which is Honda 81580-T0A-L81ZB, but it's a whopping $250 for a single armrest.

Is there anyway to purchase just the leather cover? If not, does anyone have any other ideas?

Thanks!
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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3,758 Posts
Go check our local auto upholstery shops. They can usually do amazing things.
 

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My CR-V is 5 years 55k , my steering wheel is worn out and so is my armrest, and my driver side door armrest and transmission ha! I still love my car though! Oh and even the control for the radio at least on the left! It's crazy how fast it has worn out even my old Mazda never wore out that quickly.
 

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2013 CRV EX FWD
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2,914 Posts
My CR-V is 5 years 55k , my steering wheel is worn out and so is my armrest, and my driver side door armrest and transmission ha! I still love my car though! Oh and even the control for the radio at least on the left! It's crazy how fast it has worn out even my old Mazda never wore out that quickly.
That's crazy! My 2013 EX with 62k is pristine. How is your transmission already worn out with those low miles? Have you ever changed the fluid? OP just go to an upholstery shop. I did that in my old Jeep and they did an excellent job.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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3,758 Posts
Interior modifications and changes are best done with help of a local auto interior shop
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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4,670 Posts
I got the cover for my '07 from eBay for about $32. Amazon has them too. Prices vary, but they are all made in China, probably in the same factory, so it doesn't really matter. It takes a little bit of work to install but is not too bad. There are YouTube videos of it. Luckily one of my side things is custom leatherwork, so it's a simple thing for me. But, if you can apply a little contact cement and operate a pair of sharp scissors and an x-acto knife you should be okay. The OE factory leather is paper thin (about 1.5 to 2 ounce), the Chinese cover is about 2.5 ounce, so a little better, but it is also just a bit darker in the ivory color I have. I would try it first, and if you are not happy then go talk to a local shop if you like. Just know that it will likely end up costing as much as the factory part. Most of these shops do beautiful work, but it ain't cheap. From the same sources you can also get the center seat-mounted armrest covers.

This may be slightly off topic, but it is somewhat related, so I'll share it anyway. My leather steering wheel cover on my old '91 F250 Lariat was in cracked-up shreds, so I made a new one. It turned out great in the end, but I never want to have to do that again. It took a week (I'm retired) and two tries to get it done. A leather steering wheel cover requires a very precise fit, and I went with a much heavier than stock leather, which was almost not worth it. But I persevered and got it done. I paid about $120 for a full hide, and the two pieces (I botched the first one and had to start over) used about a fourth of it, so about $30 worth of leather. I already had the 1.0 Tiger thread (best hand-stitching thread in the world), about $10 worth of it, so $40 in materials and 40-50 hours of labor. Here are some pictures of the process for those interested:


F250 SWC 002.jpg

F250 SWC 005.jpg

F250 SWC 011.jpg

F250 SWC 016.jpg

F250 SWC 017.jpg


The most difficult part of it was due to the leather I used. The OEM leather was plain old chrome tan 2/3-ounce, and I wanted something better. What I neglected to consider was that the OEM stuff lasted 25 years+. Anyway, I chose 5-ounce oil tan. The oil tan will resist sun damage/cracking much better, because the oil from your hands, which accelerates the sun damage, has no effect on it, and it simply won't dry out as quickly. But it's also more expensive. So, I chose the best leather, but where I messed up was the thickness. The new stuff is twice as thick, and oil tan is not as stretchy anyway, so trimming it to an exact fit is ten times more difficult! I miscalculated with the first skin and had to start over. You can trim more off, but you can't put it back when you trimmed too much off. It's like when you cut a board twice and it's still too short! So, fit had to be way more precise, and stitching had to be pulled very tight against the stiffer hide. Easily the most difficult part was around the spokes where the curves have to be cut to fit with extreme precision. I didn't get it perfect, but it wound up close enough to look good and should last dang near forever. Two years later it is just fine. If I had known then what I know now, I would have gotten thinner leather, which would have made fitting much easier, and still probably good enough to outlast the truck. I hate when I learn a great lesson but it's one that I will not likely ever have a need to know again. I may get a chance to use the new knowledge in my other leatherwork, though, so there is that. There are some specialty shops that do this around the country, and they are EXPENSIVE! And now I know why. Worth every penny.
 
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