Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of December's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have a 2012 CR-v EX that I bought as Honda certified used in 2014. All maintenance since has been done by Honda dealers. I am recently unemployed, and the CR-v now has almost 50K miles on it. Seems like a good time to get back in touch with my inner "Shadytree mechanic"...

I am going on a roadtrip soon and need to do brakes first. at 50K miles, should I need to replace rotors? If so, front and or rear? Safety first, but I don't want to spend more than needed.

I looked on youtube, pads/rotors replacement seem straightforward, but I found a 'brake fluid flush' video also... Is that recommended at this mileage?

Thanks for being here.

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,570 Posts
Only you can decide if new rotors are needed as we can't see the old ones. The fronts are most likely to be the ones needing replacing. I kind of doubt that they are, but, stranger things have happened before.
A fluid change isn't all that hard to do 'as long as you're in there' anyways. Get a friend to help with pushing the pedal and it's a fairly easy job.
If you do need parts, check out rock auto dot com. They have some of the best prices around for good quality parts. My brother has used them numerous times on bringing back various cars from long term storage to road worthiness.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks,

I looked at the front brakes today, while a local shop replaced the front tires. The pads are low, but the rotors look perfect. I'm going to swap the front pads tomorrow, I'll look at the rear pads while I flush the brake fluid.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
12,154 Posts
If you are not experiencing any vibration during a stop, you can skip replacing rotors. Just sand the rotors a bit to assist in pad bedding, and take it easy those first few stops.

The rear pads might be thin also (they start out thinner so that they wear out at the same time as the fronts).

The most important thing about Honda brakes is to lube the slider pins and the calipers on the underside of the stainless steel pad guides. The new pads should 'fall out' of the guides, if they don't they will bind.

Don't mix up the upper and lower SS guides or caliper pins, they are different.


Have a look at the "Similar Threads" box at the bottom of the page to learn more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you.

I completed the front pad replacement, and fluid flush today. I greased the sliders and clips, then had a handful trying to get the caliper on with the wire springs working against me to separate the pads... :D

I checked the Rear pads while I flushed the fluid, They were easily 2-3 times thicker than the old front pads, so I left them alone.

Going to drive 3500 miles in the next week or two, so new brakes and a fresh set of front tires are a good thing.

The pedal is good, and brakes feel good on test drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The old front pads were ~2mm thick, and the rears looked like around 4 or 5 mm.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
12,154 Posts
I completed the front pad replacement, and fluid flush today. I greased the sliders and clips, then had a handful trying to get the caliper on with the wire springs working against me to separate the pads... :D
LOL, if it makes you feel any better, I have the same issue with those springs fighting me. :mad:



If you have the time, you are well advised to grease the rear sliders even if the pads are OK. I do that once a year.

Don't worry, no spreader springs on the rears!:eek:
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
12,154 Posts
I have close to 60k on mine and still have probably half the pad left.
So, you are saying "Brakes are for Sissies"? LOL


A little-used 2012 would be more likely to have a binding pad due to corrosion, than one that was used everyday. In fact it might be binding in the rear, causing more brake wear in the fronts!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
806 Posts
So, you are saying "Brakes are for Sissies"? LOL


A little-used 2012 would be more likely to have a binding pad due to corrosion, than one that was used everyday. In fact it might be binding in the rear, causing more brake wear in the fronts!
LOL. No. I think a lot of it is how the vehicle is driven. I have seen people hit the brakes at the last minute, and as soon as the light goes green they hammer down on the gas. My wife has a 2006 Dodge Charger with 55k miles and the brakes on that are about the same as far as wear. Every car wash every wheel is heavily sprayed from the front side and back side. I think keeping things clean has more to do with keeping brakes from binding than one that sits and isn't kept clean. I honestly have never had to replace front brakes until around 90k on any vehicle I have owned.
 

·
Not-a-Mechanic
2011 CR-V 4WD EX
Joined
·
529 Posts
Huge variation in miles individuals get from brakes.
You can run them right down to the backing plate (not recommended) and they'll work great.
Changing out the fluid every 3 years is real smart, the ABS adds so much wear to the fluid itself.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top