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2015 CRV- RUST FROM 2019 WINTER SALT? EAST COAST RUST BELT.

Greetings. This is on a 2015 CR-V. Please see pictures. Pardon the angle as I had to reach into the wheel well on the front drivers side to take these pictures. Perhaps someone can verify what the various parts are called? Looked up some parts info on a Honda Parts website and these frame pieces are very expensive.

Not sure if any of these somewhat rusted parts need replacement such as the control arm or other frame pieces again not exact on what the technical name for the larger metal frame pieces are called.

It seems that these parts are bolted on. Perhaps some are welded and bolted on?

Do you guys think that the rust is a problem in this case? Should it be fluid filmed? Wool waxed? Scraped, repainted, etc.

Please see pictures. Thanks very much for viewing and for your time.
 

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While Honda does a really good job treating the undercarriage, you still want to do a car wash with underbody flush, periodically. Just make sure you go to a reputable automated car wash that use soft cloths instead of the bristles (and no chemical 'touchless washes' unless you don't like your clear coat). I live in Indiana, and they LOVE salting the roads, but in places like North Dakota, they used a beet juice and sand combination that worked really well -- and didn't rust out vehicles!
 

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Beet juice is added to salt brine to help depresses the freezing point of water. It has some benefit, but it is expensive. Not only do you have to buy and transport the juice, but you need to purchase and maintain the spraying/mixing equipment. In addition, when the beet juice is added to brine, the public complaints skyrocket and claims for damages (staining) on their vehicles and even mailboxes. As of this date, salt either in brine of solid forms are still more economical. We did find spraying a small amount of beet juice on rock salt did away with public complaints that "nobody spread salt on my road". They could actually see the salt.

Washing the undercarriage helps the car washes bottom line but that is about it. Salt is sticky, and after is dries it is darn hard to remove. I was part of a study trying to reduce rust in highway department snow plowing trucks and we determined it was a waste of manpower money to pressure wash the trucks after each storm. However, we found driving in a rainstorm actually did a better job.

Blasting water up at the undercarriage may make you feel better, but in the long run it isn't doing anything for rust.
 
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Beet juice is added to salt brine to help depresses the freezing point of water. It has some benefit, but it is expensive. Not only do you have to buy and transport the juice, but you need to purchase and maintain the spraying/mixing equipment. In addition, when the beet juice is added to brine, the public complaints skyrocket and claims for damages (staining) on their vehicles and even mailboxes. As of this date, salt either in brine of solid forms are still more economical. We did find spraying a small amount of beet juice on rock salt did away with public complaints that "nobody spread salt on my road". They could actually see the salt.

Washing the undercarriage helps the car washes bottom line but that is about it. Salt is sticky, and after is dries it is darn hard to remove. I was part of a study trying to reduce rust in highway department snow plowing trucks and we determined it was a waste of manpower money to pressure wash the trucks after each storm. However, we found driving in a rainstorm actually did a better job.

Blasting water up at the undercarriage may make you feel better, but in the long run it isn't doing anything for rust.
Well, if it sits there, yes, but if you flush the underbody straight away, it does help. I agree that driving in heavy rain helps a good deal as well. I prefer sand over salt... that's what we did in North Dakota, and it worked.
 
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