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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I just recently purchased a certified pre-owned 2015 Honda CR-V for my father-in-law. After the car sits for four or five days the batter is dead and has to be put on a charger. The dealer put in a brand new Honda battery but the anomaly repeated. Dealer suggested keeping the key fobs at least 30 feet away and I told them they are over 50 ft away in my home. There is some type of parasitic draw that the dealer can't find. I have done research and it seems it is a common problem with this model year CR-Vs. Has anyone else had this problem and has it been resolved?

Thank you for your help,
Mike
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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9,949 Posts
If the car is CPO the selling dealer should be obligated to find the parasitic drain, after all there is some kind of guarantee. That is why you pay more for CPO cars.

The FOB statement is malarkey. :rolleyes:

Post back with the results of the troubleshooting!
 
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2016 CRV EX-L AWD
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381 Posts
We have the same problem with our 2016 crv. I ended up upgrading our battery to a 24F size AGM battery. I have left the car for 3 weeks straight and it still starts up fine. You can see thread here for my upgrade.
2016 battery/charge/upgrade issue
 

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2008 EX AWD
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173 Posts
If the car is CPO the selling dealer should be obligated to find the parasitic drain, after all there is some kind of guarantee. That is why you pay more for CPO cars.

The FOB statement is malarkey. :rolleyes:

Post back with the results of the troubleshooting!
Agreed.
 

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2016 CR-V TOURING AWD
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6 Posts
Hi all,

I had a similar issue with an 08 Accord. Replace the A/C relay. About $8!AR Advance with lifetime warranty. Fixed it! This Gen CRV uses the same one. I had the A/C quit on my 07 Civic. Same relay again!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update:

The dealer couldn't find anything wrong. Supposedly, they checked every circuit and every circuit was within Honda factory specifications.

So, my nephew is an instructor at an automotive school and he is taking the car to his school and it will be a class project for his students to find the problem.
 

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Watched different videos of drains. Multiple used laptop and pico scope to watch over long time draw. Rear wiper controller was one problem and another was alt draw that didn't start till like hour or more after modules went to sleep
 

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2015 Honda Cr-V EX
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36 Posts
Do what "ilovemyhonda88" did... Upgrade the car battery. Fortunately, the previous owner upgraded it before I bought the car. I've heard countless times that the OEM batteries are weak and don't hold charge for longer periods of time. My feeling is that Honda wanted to shave weight off the car where ever they could to increase gas mileage.
I was very surprised to see the gas pedal is PLASTIC!!! I'm no engineer, but IMO one of the most used and important components of the car should never be made from plastic.
 

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2016 CR-V TOURING AWD
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Do what "ilovemyhonda88" did... Upgrade the car battery. Fortunately, the previous owner upgraded it before I bought the car. I've heard countless times that the OEM batteries are weak and don't hold charge for longer periods of time. My feeling is that Honda wanted to shave weight off the car where ever they could to increase gas mileage.
I was very surprised to see the gas pedal is PLASTIC!!! I'm no engineer, but IMO one of the most used and important components of the car should never be made from plastic.
No, the batteries are not lighter. I've weighed them. I've also had Honda OEM batteries last over 7 years and live where we have snow every year. Our 2016 V is still OEM.

Honda started utilizing the compact batteries for their 4 cylinders decades ago.

The gas pedal is fine. Never heard of a failure. How about the intake manifolds? No issues there either.
 

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2015 Honda Cr-V EX
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No, the batteries are not lighter. I've weighed them. I've also had Honda OEM batteries last over 7 years and live where we have snow every year. Our 2016 V is still OEM.

Honda started utilizing the compact batteries for their 4 cylinders decades ago.

The gas pedal is fine. Never heard of a failure. How about the intake manifolds? No issues there either.
Thanks for clarifying. My battery is much larger than OEM, so I figured larger is heavier.
My last CRV 2008 battery lasted 4 or 5 years, and my 1992 Integra OEM battery lasted 12 years!! I don't know a lot about batteries, but I do know CCA (Cold cranking amps) play a factor in starting batteries in cars that sit for long periods of time.... example 1 month.
The vast majority of us never have an issue because the longest our cars sit is 1-3 days.

I am happy that the brake pedal is fully made out of metal! :)
 

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I was very surprised to see the gas pedal is PLASTIC!!! I'm no engineer, but IMO one of the most used and important components of the car should never be made from plastic.
It's high impact plastic. Don't worry about it. Very common these days.
 

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2016 CR-V TOURING AWD
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Thanks for clarifying. My battery is much larger than OEM, so I figured larger is heavier.
My last CRV 2008 battery lasted 4 or 5 years, and my 1992 Integra OEM battery lasted 12 years!! I don't know a lot about batteries, but I do know CCA (Cold cranking amps) play a factor in starting batteries in cars that sit for long periods of time.... example 1 month.
The vast majority of us never have an issue because the longest our cars sit is 1-3 days.

I am happy that the brake pedal is fully made out of metal! :)
It is actually a matter of reserve amp hours. Well that and newer cars have much more parasitic losses due to electronics, keyless entry, many additional systems remain at the ready.

My 87 Integra LSS lasted something like 11 yearsfrom the factory as well. And that was when I lived in the upper plains where winter temperatures were sever
e. Cheers!
 

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2014 CRV
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23 Posts
Here is my post to a few other forum members who have had battery issues.

"Your problem is most likely the "Dual Mode" charging system which reduces the alternator output to about 12.2 volts and zero amps when the demand is low. If your driving habits are mainly short trips you may not be getting enough "on time" at about 14 volts and so the battery will gradually run down to a point where it will no longer start the engine.
Some people fiercely defend Honda and say the system works well and was put in place to improve fuel mileage. Never the less this problem does exist and it results in lots of batteries being unnecessarily sold and installed.
Always drive with your headlights on. This will increase the load such that the voltage regulator will operate at the higher output and the battery will always stay charged.
I had to purchase one battery before I analyzed all this and discovered the solution. You will find much has been written about this if you search "Honda dual Mode" or battery issues.
In the meantime if it is not too late or inconvenient you can fully charge your old battery (not very old) overnight with a battery charger of moderate size even a trickle charger and you will probably get a lot more life out of it if you drive with your headlights on "

I am sure there is a small parasitic draw but it should not be enough to be a consistent problem. If you are able to, fully charge your current battery overnight and monitor the system voltage. It should stay high if your headlights are on and the battery should stay fully charged.
 

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2013 CR-V EX-L AWD
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I have only owned my 2013 CR-V EX-L for about 18 months, and the dealer put a new battery in it just before I bought it, but I haven't had any starting problems and I often go a week or more between using the car. I never drive it in the daytime with the lights on.

After reading some of the complaints about the CR-V charging system, I hooked up a multimeter to my CR-V the other day after it had been sitting for over a week and started it without touching the throttle. The alternator output voltage immediately jumped to 14.3 Vdc at idle (and stayed there) to re-charge the battery, which is the perfect voltage to get the job done. I am going to do some more voltage monitoring as I drive the car to see what else I can learn.

Today I connected my HDS system and requested a "Consumption Current History" to see the parasitic drain on the battery for the last few power cycles.

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The service manual says that the parasitic drain 1 hr after shutdown should be -29.31 mA or less, and mine was well within that at -9.78 mA.

I couldn't find the Amp-Hr rating on this 500 CCA group 51R battery, but it should be at least 45 Amp-Hrs, and this would hold a charge for a well over a month of non-use with a parasitic drain of the recommended maximum of 30 mA. It is possible that there are many cars out there with more than the recommended drain, which would explain the frequent reports of the batteries draining down. Fortunately, my car is not in that group.

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I have to say that I am pretty impressed that the Honda battery comes with a 100 month limited warranty. I didn't think any battery had an 8+ yr warranty anymore!

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Update: I drove the CR-V today in the daytime for over an hour in mixed city and highway driving with a voltmeter connected and the light switch in the OFF position. The alternator output was always 14.2V (warm idle) and 14.3V to 14.45V when operating above an idle for both city/highway driving. The air conditioner was off and the heater fan was always on low. The often repeated statement that "the Dual Mode charging system reduces the alternator output to about 12.2 volts and zero amps when the demand is low ", doesn't appear to be true for my 2013 CR-V. I have been an Engineer for over 40 yrs, and I don't take much that I read on the internet as fact without confirming it.
 

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I recently joined the forum because of this issue. Original owner of a 2012 EX, approx 147000 miles. I just installed a new alternator and am on my fifth battery. Battery after battery cranking has usually been hesitant. Usually my batteries have died while the car was parked, but this last time while I was rolling. I changed the alternator and within a few days it happened again, so I changed the battery again. I have started driving at all times with the lights on and so far cranking is flawless, so my experience over many years is the mentioned constant drain, and my current perception is that driving with lights on is a solution.

I have a private mechanic, but I called the dealership and asked the service department If they had a solution to the CRV’s well-known battery life issues. The service rep feigned ignorance of the issue! For fun I then transferred to sales and asked the sales rep if he is aware of the battery issue. He didn’t hesitate, he said yes he’s aware of it. I told him abou the service department’s denial and asked why I should consider buying another Honda? His response was to consider getting a new battery every few years as a routine event and with that Honda’s total cost of ownership is still lower or competitive with other vehicles—an honest answer! I commended him! However, based on Honda’s corporate denial of this issue, I don’t know that I’ll be back for another Honda.
 

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2016 CR-V TOURING AWD
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I have only owned my 2013 CR-V EX-L for about 18 months, and the dealer put a new battery in it just before I bought it, but I haven't had any starting problems and I often go a week or more between using the car. I never drive it in the daytime with the lights on.

After reading some of the complaints about the CR-V charging system, I hooked up a multimeter to my CR-V the other day after it had been sitting for over a week.....
Very well documented and said. Thank you!
 

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2014 CRV
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Peterscoin said:
" I changed the alternator and within a few days it happened again, so I changed the battery again. I have started driving at all times with the lights on and so far cranking is flawless, so my experience over many years is the mentioned constant drain, and my current perception is that driving with lights on is a solution."

I am enjoying almost 4 years longevity on my current battery. I just checked it again a week ago because some are convinced there is no issue and I wanted to be sure. State of charge remains above 90 percent.

Another way to ensure that the alternator regulator stays at 14.2 volts is to disconnect the load sensor located in the fuse box next to the battery. After monitoring for two weeks the voltage never changed from 14.2. When I hooked it back up the voltage immediately dropped to 12.2 volts. This was right after starting when the battery should have been slightly discharged. Hmmmm........

Carry a jump starter for the day when turning the key produces no action.
Drive with headlights on or...
Disconnect the load sensor.
Just sayin......
 

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Peterscoin said:
" I changed the alternator and within a few days it happened again, so I changed the battery again. I have started driving at all times with the lights on and so far cranking is flawless, so my experience over many years is the mentioned constant drain, and my current perception is that driving with lights on is a solution."

I am enjoying almost 4 years longevity on my current battery. I just checked it again a week ago because some are convinced there is no issue and I wanted to be sure. State of charge remains above 90 percent.

Another way to ensure that the alternator regulator stays at 14.2 volts is to disconnect the load sensor located in the fuse box next to the battery. After monitoring for two weeks the voltage never changed from 14.2. When I hooked it back up the voltage immediately dropped to 12.2 volts. This was right after starting when the battery should have been slightly discharged. Hmmmm........

Carry a jump starter for the day when turning the key produces no action.
Drive with headlights on or...
Disconnect the load sensor.
Just sayin......
That sounds like a real solution. Driving with lights on in the daytime dims my dashboard screens, the backup camera when it is on, and it‘s hokey.
 

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Hello,

I just recently purchased a certified pre-owned 2015 Honda CR-V for my father-in-law. After the car sits for four or five days the batter is dead and has to be put on a charger. The dealer put in a brand new Honda battery but the anomaly repeated. Dealer suggested keeping the key fobs at least 30 feet away and I told them they are over 50 ft away in my home. There is some type of parasitic draw that the dealer can't find. I have done research and it seems it is a common problem with this model year CR-Vs. Has anyone else had this problem and has it been resolved?

Thank you for your help,
Mike
I have the problem on my 2017 Touring. I plugged in a set of wireless ear buds to charge and it melted the charge case and ruined it. This was on the rear 2.5 amp USB socket. The earbud mfgs say that no USB charge device on the market can do that, so it's a bad cable or the USB is pushing way more than 2.5A. I'm taking it in for the first time to get it looked at.
 
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