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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2017 CRV that the battery died after I had the car 22 months. The dealer replaced the battery with a 100 month battery at no charge. Now that battery has died after 22 months. The dealer says that happens since batteries, if they are 100 month (8 years), die when they are around 2 years. This time they won’t replace it at no charge. I’m 1,000 miles over the warranty. So until they start using better batteries, plan on a battery every 2 years.
 

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Yeah... under the 3/36 warranty... they will replace a bad battery, but that does not move the normal new battery warranty with the replacement battery.

As for the life expectancy of batteries in general, and in the CRV specifically..... there are a range of factors that shorten battery life in modern motor vehicles. One or more of them persistently taking place will shorten the life expectancy of a battery.

Key things that erode a batteries expected life span:
1) rough roads and bumpy rides can present the battery with ongoing mechanical shocks of varying degrees, which can cause a pre-mature failure of a plate within a cell.
2) The battery being allowed to sit at less than 50% charge for multiple and/or prolonged periods will accelerate sulfation of the plates.
3) Contrary popular belief.. the flooded cell batteries manufactured by the handful of big battery makers, and supplied as OEM parts to Honda ARE NOT maintenance free. The have rectangular caps that can be gingerly pried off so you can inspect the electrolyte levels in the cells and top them up with a little distilled water if they are low. This is an maintenance cycle that should be done at least once a year, and more frequently if you live in a hot weather climate during summer months.
4) Honda's dual mode charging system is something Honda has been using for years, and it tends to leave the battery at less than 100% charge when you park and turn off the engine. This is due to where the charge state was and if the charging system was in the low charge mode when you turn off the vehicle.
5) Modern vehicles have higher normal power down parasitic currents.. which will discharge a battery faster than older generation vehicles.

As I have commented in other threads.. there are two schools of thought about battery maintenance. School-1 ignore the battery completely and simply replace it when it is found dead. School-2 do periodic performance checks and maintenance checks on a battery to maximize it's useful life. Personally, I hate coming out to a vehicle with a dead battery.. so I am firmly in School-2 on this.

My battery just turned three years old in my 2017 CRV, and when I last did a performance test on it a few weeks ago... it was still at 120% of rated CCA, and plate integrity was normal, with no sulfation detected. I test our vehicle batteries once a month with a low cost home battery tester. I also check electrolyte levels twice a year, and while I live in warm but not overly hot climate.. I have had to add a little distilled water twice in three years. I also put each of our batteries on a smart charger/maintainer at least once a month so that it gets a nice rich saturation charge... which flooded cell starter batteries thrive on... the exact opposite of a battery perpetually under charged (where they sulfate early and fail early. Note: under a multi month shelter in place order in my county right now, we only drive our vehicles about once a week right now, and even then.. pretty short trips.... so when they are parked in the garage they are on a smart charger maintainer 7/24 to insure they stay properly charged.

I expect, based on monthly checks on my battery.. to get between 4 and 5 years from it before replacing. And I do not wait for it to die, to replace. As soon as I see the monthly performance checks show a CCA of less than 90% of rated CCA.. I replace a battery. When CCA begins degrading from rated spec.... the battery is on it's last legs and will die within a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah... under the 3/36 warranty... they will replace a bad battery, but that does not move the normal new battery warranty with the replacement battery.

As for the life expectancy of batteries in general, and in the CRV specifically..... there are a range of factors that shorten battery life in modern motor vehicles. One or more of them persistently taking place will shorten the life expectancy of a battery.

Key things that erode a batteries expected life span:
1) rough roads and bumpy rides can present the battery with ongoing mechanical shocks of varying degrees, which can cause a pre-mature failure of a plate within a cell.
2) The battery being allowed to sit at less than 50% charge for multiple and/or prolonged periods will accelerate sulfation of the plates.
3) Contrary popular belief.. the flooded cell batteries manufactured by the handful of big battery makers, and supplied as OEM parts to Honda ARE NOT maintenance free. The have rectangular caps that can be gingerly pried off so you can inspect the electrolyte levels in the cells and top them up with a little distilled water if they are low. This is an maintenance cycle that should be done at least once a year, and more frequently if you live in a hot weather climate during summer months.
4) Honda's dual mode charging system is something Honda has been using for years, and it tends to leave the battery at less than 100% charge when you park and turn off the engine. This is due to where the charge state was and if the charging system was in the low charge mode when you turn off the vehicle.
5) Modern vehicles have higher normal power down parasitic currents.. which will discharge a battery faster than older generation vehicles.

As I have commented in other threads.. there are two schools of thought about battery maintenance. School-1 ignore the battery completely and simply replace it when it is found dead. School-2 do periodic performance checks and maintenance checks on a battery to maximize it's useful life. Personally, I hate coming out to a vehicle with a dead battery.. so I am firmly in School-2 on this.

My battery just turned three years old in my 2017 CRV, and when I last did a performance test on it a few weeks ago... it was still at 120% of rated CCA, and plate integrity was normal, with no sulfation detected. I test our vehicle batteries once a month with a low cost home battery tester. I also check electrolyte levels twice a year, and while I live in warm but not overly hot climate.. I have had to add a little distilled water twice in three years. I also put each of our batteries on a smart charger/maintainer at least once a month so that it gets a nice rich saturation charge... which flooded cell starter batteries thrive on... the exact opposite of a battery perpetually under charged (where they sulfate early and fail early. Note: under a multi month shelter in place order in my county right now, we only drive our vehicles about once a week right now, and even then.. pretty short trips.... so when they are parked in the garage they are on a smart charger maintainer 7/24 to insure they stay properly charged.

I expect, based on monthly checks on my battery.. to get between 4 and 5 years from it before replacing. And I do not wait for it to die, to replace. As soon as I see the monthly performance checks show a CCA of less than 90% of rated CCA.. I replace a battery. When CCA begins degrading from rated spec.... the battery is on it's last legs and will die within a year.
Thank you very much for the useful information.

Right now I have AAA and they came out to jump start my car. My inclination is to continue to drive the car till the battery dies and have AAA replace it. Their price is less than the dealer and would be less of a hassle when the battery needs to be replaced.

I expect that the reduced driving and the Florida heat contributed.
 

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Yeah batteries are no longer like the older ones Lol
 
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Thank you very much for the useful information.

Right now I have AAA and they came out to jump start my car. My inclination is to continue to drive the car till the battery dies and have AAA replace it. Their price is less than the dealer and would be less of a hassle when the battery needs to be replaced.

I expect that the reduced driving and the Florida heat contributed.

Maybe next time you are out, stop by a local auto parts store and ask them to check your battery. Generally they are happy to test batteries for owners... as if it comes up weak.. they may get the sale of a new battery. Or, maybe your local AAA center can and will do that for you... worth checking. That way, you have a measure of how good your batteries remaining life is.

A fresh new battery, fully charged, should be able to sit for a month and still start in a gen5 CRV. It would need a good charge after sitting for a month.. but should still have enough reserve capacity to start the vehicle. An older battery, not so much.. because batteries literally begin to slowly head for death as soon as you fill them with electrolyte... so the older the battery the more risk of lower reserve capacity vs the slow, yet normal, parasitic drain when the vehicle sits in power down mode.
 

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I just replaced the original equipment battery in our CRV. It only lasted 6 1/2 years and didn't die a death of not holding charge, but instead it died a leaking acid death.
 
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...I also put each of our batteries on a smart charger/maintainer at least once a month so that it gets a nice rich saturation charge... which flooded cell starter batteries thrive on... the exact opposite of a battery perpetually under charged (where they sulfate early and fail early. Note: under a multi month shelter in place order in my county right now, we only drive our vehicles about once a week right now, and even then.. pretty short trips.... so when they are parked in the garage they are on a smart charger maintainer 7/24 to insure they stay properly charged...
Same here, use a smart charger -- especially nowadays with stay-at-home.

Great peace-of-mind knowing my battery is well-charged, And I'm convinced a smart charger significantly extends battery life.
 
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