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Mine snapped off a few months back! It was a scary drive home. Got my recall notice probably 2 months after the break.
So did mine, although I was able to put it back in place well enough to use it (if I was careful). I went to the dealer and they replaced it for free. Never did get a notice...
 

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Made some calls today, and I take to the dealer main office to be replaced tomorrow morning. I'm having a little talk with their Service Director while I'm there.
 

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Made some calls today, and I take to the dealer main office to be replaced tomorrow morning. I'm having a little talk with their Service Director while I'm there.
Glad you did the leg work and had success.
I got this info from a regional manager. Honda noticed this problem from about a year ago and internal testing looked very grim. They immediately had a new unit fabricated using proper plastics. They did tests and were satisfied. The big problem was manufacturing enough of them to do the total change out on each car that came in for normal servicing. While they got things going they noticed over the months that the problem seemed to be more batch related than a complete failure by the manufacturer. So the total change out was sidelined.
They still instructed dealers to change the button on any vehicle if the owner requested it or if any cracking was noticed on inspection.

Rob
 

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I have a 2018 and have got no letter, and their website shows no recalls. I don't know why my button would be any different than others
 

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I have a 2018 and have got no letter, and their website shows no recalls. I don't know why my button would be any different than others
It's not a recall.. so it will not show up in a recall check. It is a TSB for a product update.. and I don't think everyone has received a letter yet.. I have not. They are probably sending them out in waves, rather then all at once.

No need to wait for the letter though.. you can just print a copy of the TSB and take it with you to the dealer next time you are visiting for other reasons.

It has been reported that Dealers were originally instructed to check and replace all buttons with the new part number whenever a CRV came in for service.... but I am not sure if that is absolutely true, nor whether all dealers are being proactive in this regard.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
To the guy who hasnt had any problems with his CRV, my shifter broke off today while backing out of a Kroger parking lot. It was a piece on the left side you push in to shift, broke off and now am taking it in the am for a fix. Just another thing that has gone wrong or recalled on a 2 year old car with 10650 miles on it.
 

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To the guy who hasnt had any problems with his CRV, my shifter broke off today while backing out of a Kroger parking lot. It was a piece on the left side you push in to shift, broke off and now am taking it in the am for a fix. Just another thing that has gone wrong or recalled on a 2 year old car with 10650 miles on it.
rather have a car with a $10 recall thats fixed in the am then a car with no resale whos recalls are way more severe.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Well your welcome to your opinion, but to have a basically brand new car with now 10810 miles on it and to have a new battery at one year old, ac update, shift button know break off, and one or 2 others I cant think of that I have to take my time and the inconvenience of either getting a loaner or waiting for hours, as we called it back in the day, its BS.
 

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This is why it's not a good idea to be an early adopter of a newly redesigned body style. As cars become more complicated and become more computer than car, it's even more relevant than in the past. Most of the problems I'm reading about are for '17 and '18 models. Has there even been an official recall on any '19 CR-V trim line?
 

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This is why it's not a good idea to be an early adopter of a newly redesigned body style. As cars become more complicated and become more computer than car, it's even more relevant than in the past. Most of the problems I'm reading about are for '17 and '18 models. Has there even been an official recall on any '19 CR-V trim line?
2019s have had some issues as well, sometimes unique to 2019s.

For example.. a batch range of 2019s had batteries going dead, because something was wrong with the programming of the fuel purge system (an automated system on gen5s that will check and purge the fuel system if it detects an emissions alert, several hours after the vehicle has been turned off). The system apparently would not go back into power down mode. A software patch fixed this issue.

The above is a great example of an issue that affected year 3 gen5s yet had not ocurred on year one and two gen5s. The conclusion I would draw here is: 1) out-year production of a particular vehicle generation is no guarantee of not having unique issues. 2) New vehicles are complex, and have a lot of software in them and it is very often a problem with a software release level that is the root cause, and since manufacturers do in fact update software in their systems over the life of production of a vehicle generation... this IS the new normal in the motor vehicle industry.
 

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2019s have had some issues as well, sometimes unique to 2019s.

For example.. a batch range of 2019s had batteries going dead, because something was wrong with the programming of the fuel purge system (an automated system on gen5s that will check and purge the fuel system if it detects an emissions alert, several hours after the vehicle has been turned off). The system apparently would not go back into power down mode. A software patch fixed this issue.

The above is a great example of an issue that affected year 3 gen5s yet had not ocurred on year one and two gen5s. The conclusion I would draw here is: 1) out-year production of a particular vehicle generation is no guarantee of not having unique issues. 2) New vehicles are complex, and have a lot of software in them and it is very often a problem with a software release level that is the root cause, and since manufacturers do in fact update software in their systems over the life of production of a vehicle generation... this IS the new normal in the motor vehicle industry.
I agree completely. There's no guarantee of anything. Draw an analogy to cell phones. Let's say you have an iPhone 7 that has been working perfectly since you bought it 2-3 years ago, but now it's having problems with iOS 13, when it worked perfectly on IOS 10, 11, and 12. It's the same idea. But there are a lot more moving mechanical parts in a car than in a cell phone.

If possible, it's also good to buy a later date production vehicle within a model year. It gives the manufacturer time to address issues that pop up early. The 2019 LX I picked up today has a manufacture date of 10/19. The dealer likes selling old inventory first, but I insisted I wanted the most recent unit with the lowest mileage. Between the naturally aspirated engine and late build date, I don't expect many problems with it.
 

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This is why it's not a good idea to be an early adopter of a newly redesigned body style. As cars become more complicated and become more computer than car, it's even more relevant than in the past. Most of the problems I'm reading about are for '17 and '18 models. Has there even been an official recall on any '19 CR-V trim line?
Choosing to become an educated consumer makes this way easier. For example, I believe I've made two 'extra' trips to the dealer even though I have had most of the TSBs applied.

I know what the recurring problems are and twice a year or so pay for tech info and update my knowledge of what's going on. I use this to my advantage to save time, as well as to be on the lookout for indicated problems.

For example, after 2 years of ownership, I complained of a 'loose' shift knob during an oil change (it was technically true), and they replaced it, I felt this would buy me some time until the real TSB came out. When that happened, I had them replace it again during an oil change.

Same strategy for the heater core pipe rattle clamp fix... I didn't actually have this issue for some time, but when a new rattle appeared I instantly knew what it was, and had it fixed at the next oil change.

Finally, another little secret, if you use the Honda app to schedule your appointment, in your notes where the describe the issue, this bypasses the service advisor and is passed verbatim to the maintenance shop. The SAs own notes of the issue are also passed, but they are always super vague.

The way to do this is like this: 'new dash rattle at low speed RPMs during cold starts. During your diagnostic please consider tsb 17-054, might be an easy fix - please call before taking dash apart.' I have had a 100% success rate using this strategy.

I know some are saying that you shouldn't have to do any of this. I understand that pov too.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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I know some are saying that you shouldn't have to do any of this. I understand that pov too.
Even beyond "shouldn't have to," it's a question of desire. Everything has a cost and/or risk vs. benefit comparison. Is it worth it to have extra electronic features and equipment when the price to be paid is keeping up with all known issues and manipulating the service department at your dealer? Or is the ease and convenience of never having to worry about this stuff (and never setting foot in a dealer's service department if you don't want to) worth sacrificing some equipment and features? I'm glad I bought a base model. The Nissan I traded was in fantastic shape for being six years old with nearly 70,000 miles, and it showed no signs of failure anywhere except for a small crack in the outside door handle on the driver door. But I got tired of always worrying about whether my indepedent mechanic or local dealer filled the CVT fluid to the proper level, and in any Nissan CVT, proper fluid level is absolutely critical. I just don't want to bother dealing with this crap. I want to get in my car and know it will take me where I want to go, even after it has driven several hundred thousand miles.
 
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