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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the 14 months I have owned this CRV, I have encountered the erratic flashing on the HUD (brightness high low etc) many times. The last time while I was using android auto with maps to find my way in a city.
I have also experienced the infamous "radar obstructed" problem while drivng in rain which is when you most need a collision mitigation system.
Today, just to put the icing on the cake, the shift button pops out in my hand.
Who can I write to or call. What happened to Honda reliability?

Len
 

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The message for "Radar Obstructed" hasn't happened to me since I had the TSB put on; take it into the dealer with you on the same visit you go to get the shift button replaced. And certainly report the flashing brightness; if a passenger using the car at the time or if the car is stopped, get a video. Report it nonetheless so there's a record of it even if they don't fix it straight off.
 

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IMO these so-called collision mitigation systems and warnings make things more dangerous for all of us rather than less. As far as I can see, they are designed to make up for lack of proper attention by the driver. I am a retired big truck driver who spent a lifetime out there driving, and I don't believe there is any valid substitute for driver attention, focus, and preparedness. I think these types of aids will make drivers tend to pay less attention rather than more, and rely on systems too much that are essentially as yet not fully developed, nor are their functions better or safer than the driver can do without them. IMO if a driver thinks they give him an edge or advantage it is a false one. These types of systems have been experimented with for quite a few years now on big trucks, and so far there is no proven benefit, and in many cases has proven to be a liability in accidents. In my experience the great majority of people out there driving today have few if any driving skills, and that is where the problem is. That and driver distraction. These things cause more deaths than drunk drivers. I believe cell phones need a federal law to make their texting and search functions, as well as being able to talk without hands-free function, inoperable. Drivers need much more extensive safe driving training, skill training, and refresher training as mandatory to keep a license. Want to add a new car function that saves lives? make it so that any person who has consumed alcohol cannot start or drive a car. Add a new computer that will shut a car down when road rage-type operation is detected.

You don't need a blind spot camera, you need a larger mirror and the skill to adjust it properly. You don't need a lane departure warning or a tailgating alarm or braking system, you need to focus and pay attention. If you can't commit to do those things, you should not be granted the privilege of a driver's license. And it is a privilege, not a right. They have systems in trucks to warn a driver that he is falling asleep. The same system could warn a driver who is not paying proper attention. Let's have that system. It could warn a soccer mom that she is about to run over a motorcycle, and a myriad of other things. And it could maintain a log which could be read by a LEO when someone is stopped and tries to lie their way out of whatever is going on that is causing them to drive improperly. Then, that person could be ticketed, and required at some point to attend training to keep their license.

So, there are some innovations that definitely help, but I don't think these new ones they are trying out now will help, I think they will do more harm than good. Not to mention being ridiculously expensive to repair.

My views may be somewhat militant, but I do have good reasons for having them, namely all the insane crap I've witnessed in over five million miles of driving. And though I am retired now, I still drive enough to see and know that it is getting worse out there, not better. I think we need to exert driver restrictions that are just as strict for Class C drivers as they are for Class A ones, especially since Class C ones cause so many more accidents than Class A ones, yet have no training, no skills, and pretty much no laws or testing requiring them to maintain any level whatsoever of skill, training, and/or performance capability. That laxness needs to come to a screeching halt, and the sooner the better. I also think all the training should be conducted by experienced drivers, and not cops or troopers or pencil-pushers who can't drive any better than the people they're testing. People with a record of proven skill and experience.

Okay, rant over. Wow, all that out of crash mitigation systems. Am I crazy, or what?
 

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Truck driving is very different from car driving. The IIHS has actually studied the systems, and found that they reduce rear-end crashes by a very significant 40%.

To that statistic, I would say that first, statistics can be easily manipulated to show whatever the presenter wants to show. Not that that is necessarily what that figure represents, but - second, since the tech is pretty much new and very little of it is as yet out there, their control groups could not possibly be large enough to show any meaningful difference. My estimate is that five years from now the numbers will be much different. I know my insurance provider offers no discounts for such equipment, which makes me doubt the validity of any point such a study could make anyway. If people would accept this new tech as additional help, that would be great. But they won't. They will use it to believe they can get away with paying even less attention than they were, which his already not enough. You can not be too focused, too present, or too attentive while driving. Add to that the fact that even then, anything can happen at any second, and does, and you have a situation where one lost second of focus can be a disaster. Which is true when you are 100% anyway, so you also need to be thinking about what is happening around you and what mi9ght come up in the immediate future and constantly be prepared to have an out no matter what. And even when you do all that to perfection, you still might not live through the day, because you are surrounded by people who are not doing that. But it is your best shot, and sometimes your only shot. If new tech can help you in that context, then I am all for it. But I seriously doubt most people will use it that way.

Truck driving differs from car driving only where the vehicle parameters are concerned. It is equally important for all drivers to pay attention and be focused and present 100% of the time, regardless of what they are driving. The number of accidents and fatalities is way, way far disproportionate per capita between the two groups. Class C drivers are of a far less capable class than Class A drivers. Class C drivers have literally no training whatsoever (other than high school driving courses, which give mostly no skill improvement and which are not even required). 99% of Class C drivers have absolutely no formal training at all. They have no driver education, no safety training, and basically have no skills at all. Of course, there are a lot of poorly trained truck drivers out there, too, but they do have all those types of training and are required to undergo OTJ training and supervision until released by a trainer to be on their own. Not enough, IMO, but they do have it. And it shows, as their statistics are much, much better. Of course, a truck driver doesn't need to learn how to parallel park, and a car driver does not need to learn specific backing or cornering skills, since he is not driving an oversize vehicle.

But, otherwise, I believe Class C drivers should be required to undergo strenuous and rigorous safety/traffic laws/rules/driver courtesy training, and skills training, and repeated periodic testing, and I believe they should have to meet the same basic driver physical, knowledge, and skills requirements as Class A truck drivers. This would make a huge difference in driving on American roads. I'd also like to see road rage and extremes of aggressive and controlling driving behaviors be made felony criminal offenses. The longer this fails to happen, the more real actual driving becomes like a freaking video game, except that instead of points on a screen, it is becoming statistics on a chart. Very bad statistics.


So, yes, driving a truck is quite different from driving a car, where the vehicle is concerned, but the driving itself is exactly the same, regardless of what you are driving, and it needs to have the same education, skills, training, and requirements. If you believe otherwise, you are mistaken, or simply in denial. I sincerely hope and pray that you and/or your loved ones don't have to learn this the hard way.
 

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As with any vehicle...don't like it...trade it off on another...take the loss, if any, and move on. I couldn't keep a vehicle I didn't enjoy. I rather take the loss than constantly whine...
I had the shift button problem...dealer replaced in within 30 minutes
I've had the radar/camera problem happen in snow and rain at times...in snow I cleared the sensor cover and no more problem...in the rain is cleared itself in several minutes...hard to do its' job when it can't see...not a big deal as I rely on the "mark one eyeballs" more than technology...it is a backup and one I'm happy to have.
 

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kloker... In my opinion, if even ONE life is saved by these safety features, then they should all be standard equipment on every car /truck, etc made available for sale new. There is not one of us who hasn't been distracted for a few seconds while driving, and if the safety feature comes to our rescue, then .... well what can I say, I will not change your opinion, or am I interested in doing so.

BTW, (again, in my opinion) your might want to be more concise in your posts if you want folks to read thru them.
 

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IMO these so-called collision mitigation systems and warnings make things more dangerous for all of us rather than less. As far as I can see, they are designed to make up for lack of proper attention by the driver.
100% agree with that statement. I can see how the statistics would show a 40% decrease in some collisions but that is only because the cell phone craze and all the other tech crazes over the last several years have increased distracted driver accidents by probably 300% (just a guess). So yes if you introduce mitigation systems you will get a reduction from an already bad problem. The rub is that the mitigation system makes the user feel even more empowered to drive while being distracted so that 40% will most likely evaporate as more of these systems roll out and they become the norm.


Rob
 

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Kai - I'm with you. I do believe that most folks buy what they want, and will try mightily to adapt, repair, whatever is needed to be able to keep that dream. And, of course, whining is usually disproportionate to the severity of the problem.

JB - I did not mean to suggest that these new systems are inherently unreliable, just that, as with any new tech, it will have to evolve, and will have some difficulties along the way. If it works for you, great! If it actually makes you safer, even better. My worry about it is that there are many people out there for whom it will be a detriment, because they will think it allows them to be less circumspect. These days the great majority of those around you at any given point in traffic are busily distracted and this new tech will not help them develop better habits, nor will it compensate for the lack of them. The reality is that only 10% of drivers are actually consciously focused on driving the whole time, and some of those are folks who have learned the hard way. I'm just saying.

Where was I insufficiently concise? Please explain and I will try to comply.

az-crv - Actually, it was put in big trucks years ago, long before it ever began tryouts in cars. And, in big trucks the same has proven to hold true, ask any truck driver with 20 years experience. Most major carriers have rejected it based on results seen at the small number of carriers who have used it, and small carriers don't use it because it costs extra. Another qualifier here is that the carriers who do use it have accident rates that are so crushingly horrible that there is no way to tell if it has helped or not. On the other hand, the carriers with the best safety records do not use it. They know that it's about the quality of driver you hire, not the truck. That same axiom holds true in cars as well. Better drivers are the key, which is why licensing for Class C (car) drivers needs to be made much more stringent. No amount of technology is going to solve it. Once the driver problem is efficiently dealt with, then yes, some of that new tech might help a little, but not before.

Of course, the government is the wild card in the equation. If this new tech is forced on the trucking industry, just keep this in mind. It's the same government that still allows Class C drivers on the road with literally no training or any other safety requirements. If you can parallel park (no one needs that anymore) and pass a 30-question written test about signs, you can jump on the freeway with the rest of us, and start brake checking big trucks and running other cars off the road while texting and grinning. After all, how much more fun can life and death be?

It's also the same government that instituted the 5-mph bumper. Stopped requiring headlight aiming. Allowed vehicle lighting that is dangerously blinding. Mandates that you are required to have a 200mph explosive airbag within inches of your face the entire time you are driving, when they are so problematic that literally 50% of them are on recall right now. Etc. Of course, there is also a lot of safety regulation out there that is good, that has made a huge difference. Like seat belts. It is all constantly evolving and changing, and, while some of it is improvement, not all of it is. And that's not political, it's just a function of progress. We learn as we go. The same will prove to be true with all this new tech. Some of it will actually be progress. Some of it will not. Kay Sarah, eh? Voyla. Good luck to us all. I keep telling everyone we live in a cartoon. Then they look at me funny. Then I tell them to just listen to the background music, and rest my case.
 
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