Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My maintenance minder just came on my 2018 AWD CRV and said I need to do a 4wd oil change (or something like that, in addition to the oil and filter change). That surprised me, since I only have about 14k miles on the car, and in the past I've only changed the differential fluid every 60k or so. The manual that came with the car said to not change this fluid oneself, and to have someone else do it. Is the procedure for this any different than on an older CRV, where (like other AWD cars), I drain the fluid out from the bolt at the bottom of the differential, and then fill it until it hits the threads on the top bolt-hole? It has been pretty easy to do on my 2011 CRV, and wonder if something has changed, and that is why they recommend it be done by a professional. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
The new CRVs are not 4wd like the old ones. They are AWD. So the system requires more attention.

They say it's best for a shop to do because of the attention to detail required and so many made mistakes doing so in the past would be my guess.

But if you look it up on Google, from what I remember it's not really any different. Just have to make sure things are done exactly correct so you don't damage the rear differential. Proper fluid, proper fluid level, vehicle being level when changing and so on.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
17 CRV EXL AWD, 14 CRV EXL AWD
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
The first drain and fill pops up around 14k. They want you to flush out the clutch and metal crud created during brake in. The next service on the MM is 60k or longer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the responses. I wasn't worried as much about the timing, as about Honda saying to not do this yourself. Since it seems to be the same procedure as on a 2011 (which I've done a few times), I'll get the fluid and do it. To me, the only hard thing about the job is pumping the fluid up into the diff; inevitably, my tube will pop out and fluid will go everywhere, ....
Thanks.
 

·
Registered
17 CRV EXL AWD, 14 CRV EXL AWD
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
I prefer letting gravity do the work, I use section of clear tubing from Home Depot attached to funnel. Attach the funnel to the door handle or step ladder, stick the other end of the tubing in the diff and fill the differential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
Thanks for all the responses. I wasn't worried as much about the timing, as about Honda saying to not do this yourself. Since it seems to be the same procedure as on a 2011 (which I've done a few times), I'll get the fluid and do it. To me, the only hard thing about the job is pumping the fluid up into the diff; inevitably, my tube will pop out and fluid will go everywhere, ....
Thanks.
Yeah, it's kinda weird that Honda is the only automaker I know of that still gives oil change instructions right there in the owner's manual, but then suggests that you leave other utterly-routine stuff to a professional mechanic. (Why oil changes and not, say, the cabin or engine air filters? And certainly somebody that can change the oil could handle the rear diff; it's not difficult.)
 

·
Registered
2018 CR-V AWD Touring
Joined
·
371 Posts
I prefer letting gravity do the work, I use section of clear tubing from Home Depot attached to funnel. Attach the funnel to the door handle or step ladder, stick the other end of the tubing in the diff and fill the differential.
Are you able to use this method by yourself (no helper) without making a mess? How do you keep the tubing in the differential and know when to stop pouring the fluid in the funnel without overfilling? Do you just pour a bit at a time and keep checking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,407 Posts
Are you able to use this method by yourself (no helper) without making a mess? How do you keep the tubing in the differential and know when to stop pouring the fluid in the funnel without overfilling? Do you just pour a bit at a time and keep checking?
Well you should have a drain pan under the diff.

So it takes a little more than 1 qt. So if you get all of the first bottle in safely without spilling, when you start pouring the second, you just wait for it to spill into the drain pan and stop pouring. You could go slower on the second quart and do it by yourself easily.
 

·
Registered
17 CRV EXL AWD, 14 CRV EXL AWD
Joined
·
2,563 Posts
Are you able to use this method by yourself (no helper) without making a mess? How do you keep the tubing in the differential and know when to stop pouring the fluid in the funnel without overfilling? Do you just pour a bit at a time and keep checking?
Yes, by myself. Below is the funnel and tubing that I use...Maybe a funnel might not the correct name for it but I found it at a auto parts store. The tubing is a 3 or 4 ft section of 5/8" tubing. I leave the drain pan under the diff when filling it. Since the diff holds approx. 1.5 qt. I pour in the first bottle and when I'm near half a bottle on the second bottle, I watch for when fluid starts draining out of fill port of the diff.
Pull the tubing out of the diff and allow any overfill to finish dripping out of the fill port.
Water Oxygen mask Plastic bottle Mask Headgear
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
If I had an AWD, I think I'd just get a hand-pump from Harbor Freight (as of today, it's all of $7), and call it a day. (And write "oil-only!" on it in big letters so I don't accidentally use the same one for fuel or something.) And, usefully, it even comes with a long length of dip-stick sized tubing so you could even jam it down into your crankcase to suck out dilution/overfill.
 

·
Registered
2018 CR-V AWD Touring
Joined
·
371 Posts
If I had an AWD, I think I'd just get a hand-pump from Harbor Freight (as of today, it's all of $7), and call it a day.
I actually have one of these and haven't had very good success with it. I've tried to use it to drain the fuel from both a generator and a snow thrower and the pump never seemed to develop enough suction. I've had better luck with a Pennzoil Siphon Pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,407 Posts
I actually have one of these and haven't had very good success with it. I've tried to use it to drain the fuel from both a generator and a snow thrower and the pump never seemed to develop enough suction. I've had better luck with a Pennzoil Siphon Pump.
Yeah I read so many bad reviews on those transfer pumps that I stayed away. Bottle pump wasn't a lot better, but I didn't spill an ounce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top