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"See, how it works is, the train moves, not the station." :giggle: Honda purchases tires by the trainload, based on what they get the best bulk deal on. Assembly plants do not roll vehicles off the line knowing where they are going. The distribution network then takes over and ships them to where they calculate they are needed. Which could be anywhere in the nation. Nowhere in that process do they consider color, trim level, equipment, or tires, as part of that distribution. In the 1960's, you could go down to your dealer, if you had the scratch, and special order a car to be delivered equipped as you wanted it, custom, just for you. Color, engine, transmission, gears, A/C, trim level, tires, etc. Everything. But that was sixty years ago. I know, I was there. Those days are way long gone.

The way it works these days, you buy the car as is, or they don't sell it to you. You can add things, like accessories, but mostly, you can't change things. So you buy the car, which comes with OEM grade tires, which are not retail quality. You run those down, which doesn't take long, and then you put the tires you want on there. Done. Or if conditions warrant, you change them sooner. Tires are like cat toys. Once they are all covered with cat spit, you can't take 'em back. So, if you really want different tires, you have to make that part of the deal when you buy the car. Some dealers will work with you, others won't. But the only time you have any leverage is before you hand over the money, both with used and new cars. If you've already bought the car, it's too late now. But next time you'll know. Knowledge is power.

Besides, when you abandon the great white North and move down here, you're gonna need different tires anyway. And if you don't, that's your problem. I'm already here. :giggle:
 

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Which tires came on your CR-V are not something your local dealer has any control over.
The tires are installed at the factory, so blame American Honda Motor Corp if you want.

I tried to look up the Ecopia tire ratings, but there are so many different models I have no way to know which you have on your CR-V. Any all season tire is going to compromise somewhere.

And please remember that the AWD system in the CR-V is not a full time AWD/4WD system, and operates most of the time as a Front Wheel Drive.

I used to live near Indianapolis, which gets horrible ice and snow starting in January, and then moved to Rochester, NY where gets significantly more snow but not as cold of temperatures. My 1999 CR-V did fine in the snow with the original tires, but I admit it would have handled better with "real" snow and ice tires. And there was one bad snow storm that knocked out power to a large section of Rochester, NY one winter. I ended up moving to a hotel in Buffalo, NY for a few weeks. On the drive from Rochester to Buffalo there were a lot of big 4x4 trucks that had slid off the road into the ditches, while my CR-V got me there. Of course I wasn't driving like I thought my RT4WD CR-V was able to do anything, and drove fairly slowly and cautiously.
I found that my 2001 CR-V's AWD system (same as your '99) did better overall in snow with its original factory Bridgestone Dueler tires than my '16 did with its original factory Bridgestone Duelers. And, I bought my '16 with only 12,000 miles on it. So, I recently bought a set of Continental TrueContact Tour tires for the '16. We'll see how it does this winter once we get some snow. Last year, I almost slid through an intersection at low speed, and the traction when accelerating was terrible with the factory tires. Most all car manufacturers cheap out when it comes to factory tires, and perhaps the quality of tire they come with has gotten even worse since I bought my '01, which i bought brand new.
 

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We have a 2013 CR-V AWD we bought used with Ironman all season tires on it. I have been driving in snow and ice for nearly 50 years and this is about the second best vehicle I ever owned in the snow. As far as ice, studs work the best but the down sides to them outweigh the benefits to me. The Ironman tires are all season and more noisy than the average all season to me but they work well overall. The most popular winter tires around here are Firestone Winter Force and Master Craft Glacier Grip. They both work great at first but wear pretty fast and you get lots of noise with them. Generally I put them on the first year, take them off in the spring, put them on the second year and then leave them on until they are worn out. I found even with taking them off the second year they are pretty useless the third winter season.

As far as new car tires, I think what Henry Ford said to his friend Harvey Firestone is still true. Ford said, "I need tires that are round, black, and cheap. But they don't have to be round or black."
 

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For all who bitch about the cheap CRV tire, we all bought knowing the tires were crap. I live on Beech Mtn NC and winter I went to Bridgestone Studless Ice Tires and on one and Michelin on the other CRV. I prefer the Bridgestone and once other is worn out will replace with Bridgestone as about same in snow/ice but Bridge is lower in cost. I also own a 2020 Pilot and the factory tires are cheap and I will NOT replace till spring.
 

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.... Go get the tires you need for the conditions you're going to be driving in, and be happy. Folks the world over who live in cold climates have two sets of tires and wheels - one for summer, one for winter. Others just keep the tires on hand and switch back and forth with the seasons. Simple, and effective ...
Yup. I live in north region and everyone on my street has 2 different sets of rims/tires - for each of their vehicle. re: All seasons for summer and Ice/Snow for winter months. And its so normal, auto shops in my region provide free tire storage - for folks who don't have back yard sheds or storage rooms to store their off-season removed rims/tires. This works for us northern folks. And, its normal expectation of owning a vehicle.
 

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So the fact that AWD is design for poor weather conditions has no effect on which tires Honda chooses? That is like saying its OK to put passenger tires on a 3/4 ton pickup... yes you can do it, and it will save money, and it will drive OK for awhile, but those tires are UNSAFE for the intended purpose of the vehicle.

I know Winter tires are the best - I've had them before.

I also know that selling an AWD CRV in Michigan with the WORST all-season tires ever created is BAD BUSINESS.

The way Honda markets their vehicles, which caused me to spend my money on this CRV, is that SAFETY COMES STANDARD - until it snows, that is... now its just an "optional extra" that I need to buy... Really - I can't describe how poorly it drives in the snow and I've driven in snow all my life.

You guys have been drinking way too much Kool-aid.
I, too, have a 2018 CRV (EX) with Ecopia tires. I live in Maine. We get plenty of snow, even in southern Maine where we spend the winter. We have also driven to Florida with this car for a couple of winters and have run into snow on the interstate in PA and elsewhere. The tires have been fine for us in snow and rain. My two complaints about the Ecopias are that they started at only 10/32 of tread depth and are down to 4/32nds after only 24,000 miles; and after the last rotation, they went from fairly quiet to a whump-whump noise. The latter seems to be improving after a thousand miles of rubbing off the humps. I agree that it is disappointing to find such tires on what has otherwise been a good driving car for us. I plan to get a better tire soon....if I can figure out what is actually better.
 

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I have a 2018 CRV EX-L with the Bridgestone Ecopia tires. Living here in Minnesota we have a mixed bag of weather including hot,cold, rain, snow and everything else. Haven't had much confidence with the Ecopia tires. Had put only 12,000 miles on them with one winter (they are not good in snow, didn't think they were meant to be) and because of the rapid wear and lack of performance I decided to buy new tires before we settle into anther Minnesota winter. I don't buy winter tires for my vehicles, I know there are good all seasons tires that will work OK in snow. I have Michelin Defenders on my Tacoma and they are great in snow with quiet ride and good mileage. I put a set on my CRV today and it was night and day compared to the Ecopia's. Michelin is so much better. Take this for what it is worth.

Good luck with tires!
 

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Thanks for the report on the Michelin Defender. I've been shopping around and researching and saw good things also about the BF Goodrich Advantage TA Sport LT and the General Altimax RT43 from TireRack and Consumer Reports. However, somebody on this thread disliked the Altimax. I think that even within the same Brand and Model, the performance of the tire on Traction, Mileage, and Noise varies from size to size. I guess "rolling resistance" has as much to do with deciding to "roll the dice" as with how well the rubber meets the road.
 
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