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I was going to call the Honda dealer and ask this question but they are all closed for 2 more weeks due to the Pandemic (can't blame them for wanting to stay safe). The question is about the brake caliper bleed sequence when performing a brake fluid change. On older models I read that you start at the drivers side front caliper and go clockwise from there. I have been unable to confirm that it also applies to 2017 and newer models via any other source.

Also, any comments on Honda OEM brake fluid versus top quality non-oem fluid?

Stikine

PS: the MM indicated it was time after 2 years from the in service date and about 47,000 kms
 

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Yes, the sequence LF, RF, RR, RL is still valid for the 5th Gen CRVs. Any name brand DOT 3 fluid is fine.
 

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Fluid capacity, depends how long you flush. A quart, is good yeah. Did mine from furthest to closest, no problems so far. (dot 4) I would not buy Honda fluid when it so cheap at walmart.
 

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I’m still waiting for people to explain their underlying science of their particular choice, with the sequence of caliper bleeding......😉
 

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I’m still waiting for people to explain their underlying science of their particular choice, with the sequence of caliper bleeding......😉
If you are flushing old fluid and there is little or no air in the system it doesn't matter what sequence you use. However in the worst case, where all lines are dry. If you were to start with the wheel closest to the master cylinder and bleed it until there is no air, and then moved on to the wheel furthest from the master cylinder, as you're pushing the air out of that longest branch you might get some air bubbles in the shortest branch that you just filled. However with ABS modulators or proportioning valves, exactly how the brake lines are arranged. It's not as straight forward as start with the farthest wheel from the master cylinder and work your way back to the closest wheel anymore. So it's usually best to use the manufacturer's suggested sequence.
 

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If you are flushing old fluid and there is little or no air in the system it doesn't matter what sequence you use. However in the worst case, where all lines are dry. If you were to start with the wheel closest to the master cylinder and bleed it until there is no air, and then moved on to the wheel furthest from the master cylinder, as you're pushing the air out of that longest branch you might get some air bubbles in the shortest branch that you just filled. However with ABS modulators or proportioning valves, exactly how the brake lines are arranged. It's not as straight forward as start with the farthest wheel from the master cylinder and work your way back to the closest wheel anymore. So it usually best to use the manufacturer's suggested sequence.
While I have no intention of ever undertaking this procedure, the best advice is always your last sentence, which I bolded above. 😁
 

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However in the worst case, where all lines are dry. If you were to start with the wheel closest to the master cylinder and bleed it until there is no air, and then moved on to the wheel furthest from the master cylinder, as you're pushing the air out of that longest branch you might get some air bubbles in the shortest branch that you just filled.
What would prevent the same air bubbles, from getting in the longest line If you had done that one first, and were pushing air out of the shortest line second?
Just trying to wrap my head around different people’s logic on this one 😉
 

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What would prevent the same air bubbles, from getting in the longest line If you had done that one first, and were pushing air out of the shortest line second?
Just trying to wrap my head around different people’s logic on this one 😉
Air is less dense than brake fluid and depending on the piping and components in the system air can get trapped and migrate back to a line that was just flushed. A great example is the 2004 Mitsubishi Endeavor . Depending on if it had ABS or not the sequence was different. If it didn't have ABS you needed to flush the front wheels twice to get all the air out. The manufacturer's sequence is LF, RR, LF(again), RF, LR, RF(again). If it had ABS the sequence is RR, LF, LR, RF.
The manufacturer has figured out the best way to flush the brakes for each model and the sequences varies.
 

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The reason you bleed the closest to the furthest is because you want to make certain there is clean fluid in the lines closest to the master cylinder when you bleed the rears. If you bleed the rear first, the dirty fluid from the front line may be drawn into the clean fluid going to the rear. Why? Most FWD vehicles today do not have both front wheels tied to one section of the master cylinder and both rear wheels to the other. Most are "cross-connected"; that is, the LF brake line is connected to the RR brake line and the RF brake line is connected to the LR brake line. The reason is so that there is more even braking of the vehicle front to back and left to right should one of the hydraulic circuits fail. (In older RWD vehicles that have dual master cylinder reservoirs, you find both front connected to one reservoir and both rears are connected to the other. On vehicles with disc/drum systems, both front disc calipers are connected to the larger reservoir and the smaller reservoir goes to the rear brakes.
 
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