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There have been a few small issues/noises that the dealer says can't be fixed. They did fix the weatherstripping coming off the door jamb at about 4k miles... never had that on any other car, and I've had a few...Overall, I expected better from Honda as this is my first Honda. All the folks at work swear by Honda (I'm a college prof) but mine has just as many problems as the last new car I bought, which was a Chevrolet. Same family owns a Chevrolet and a Honda dealership in town, right across the street from each other. When I go to the Chevy dealer, they fix the problem. When I go to the Honda dealer, they say nothing is wrong. Honda does have much better resale, but I can't see any logical reason as to why.

Most of these are minor annoyances... Now for my real issue.

Tires supplied by Honda are 100% USELESS in snow or ice. Why any company would produce an AWD vehicle designed for bad weather and put Bridgestone Ecopia tires on it is beyond me, and I have two Masters degrees. The CR-V is so bad with these tires that my other car, a small FWD Chevy, outperforms it, even with all-season tires. If I put snow tires on the FWD car, I can go through foot-deep drifts with little issue. The nearly new CR-V struggles to stay on the road when cornering in 2 inches of snow... I've been driving in Midwest winters for 40 years, so that's not the issue.

Online reviews of this tire are nearly unanimous. Its not even all-season - its summer only, if you value your life. This tire is 28th out of 29 in the all-season category on Tire Rack's quality survey, with millions of miles reported, so I'm not making this up. Apparently, the only people who think this is good tire are the engineers or the bean-counters at Honda.

The AWD CR-V is the worst performing winter vehicle I have had in over 20 years and its the only AWD vehicle I've ever owned.

Called the dealer and they are willing to look at it, but there is probably nothing they can do just like the other small issues. I need to buy four new tires with only 5500 miles on the CR-V. Sales manager at dealer called me and said he could see what he could do, but it probably will not be anything significant, and its really not his fault.

Even if the dealer helps me with the cost of a new set of tires, this was still a very bad move on the part of Honda - a very bad move which I will pay for (and maybe the dealer.)

If you are listening, I'd like to have a reply. If I don't get a reply, its probably a one-and-done with Honda for me. The CR-V is useful in the summer, but it isn't as problem-free as people claim and without expensive tire upgrades, forget about it in the winter.

I was led to believe that the Honda experience would be way better than this, especially with AWD.
 

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If you're expecting a response on this forum from Honda Corporate I wouldn't hold your breath. This forum is not run by Honda, and while there are several members who admit to being Honda mechanics, they don't speak for Honda, but comment based on their own experiences and opinions.

And congratulations on your two Masters degrees. Personally, I have three earned college degrees, one of which is a Masters. That doesn't make me any smarter about Hondas or CR-Vs, but owning three different CR-Vs over the past 19 years helps some. But with two masters degrees you should have taken an Economics class at some point. My masters level Econ class was given by a prof who on the first day hung a sign at the front of the class that read: GREED IS GOOD! Businesses, including American Honda Motor Corp, operate so as to make a profit. And yes, that includes buying the cheapest tires they can find that meet the minimum requirements of the vehicle. That does not mean they use tires with good snow and ice ratings in the Northern states, or tires with good wet condition ratings in the Northwest.

And you keep saying AWD (All Wheel Drive), but I'm not sure you understand the way the Honda CR-V system works. It's normally a Front Wheel Drive where some power is transferred to the rear wheels when the system detects that the front wheels are turning at a different speed than the rear wheels. It's worked that way from the very first CR-V when it was call RT4WD (Real Time 4 Wheel Drive). The only difference over the years is that the reaction time to transfer power to the rear wheels has decreased as newer models have been released, and they switched from calling it RT4WD to calling it AWD. But if you dig into the automobiles.honda.com website for details on the current CR-V you may be able to locate the following statement:

Available Real Time All-Wheel Drive (AWD) with Intelligent Control System.
So they still note that it's "Real Time" which means it's a part time system, and all 4 wheels do not get power all the time.

As for the tires, my 2014 didn't come with Ecopia, so I may have dodged a bullet. Instead it had Dueller H/P tires, which if you check tirerack.com ratings, their Winter/Snow Performance ratings are almost as bad as the Ecopias.

I would add this thought. Regardless of how much the dealer is going to help you out by giving you some sort of discount on new tires, what kind of tires do you think they stock in the size for your CR-V? My guess is they're probably, at best, a mid-range tire, if not the exact same tires you have on your CR-V right now. Or they'll send you off to a local tire shop, where they'll put on cheap tires.

I replaced the OEM Dueller H/P tires this morning with BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT tires I bought from tirerack.com, and had shipped to a local Firestone dealer. They have a Winter/Snow rating of 8.9, with 9.3 light snow, 8.8 deep snow, and 8.5 ice traction ratings. According to the receipt from Firestone, my odometer reading was 43,551 when they swapped the tires. So I got 43,000 miles out of the Duellers.

Before buying from tirerack.com I asked my local Honda dealer about tires and I got a vague "we can take care of you" response, which made me decide to look elsewhere for tires. My recommendation is to do some research on tires, then when you talk to your Honda dealer ask about the tires you want them to get for you.

Good luck.
 

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Those tires are absolute garbage in the snow! I replaced mine after 15 months and 16K miles with the same BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT mentioned above (Sam's Club had a nice instant rebate on them at the end of October) and I'm looking forward to seeing how well they work when the frozen stuff stats flying.
Honda seems to be pretty good at putting rotten tires on their vehicles. My 07' Element came with GoodYear Wrangler HP's (The joke on the Element forums was that HP stood for Hydroplane and they weren't kidding there. Talk about a scary tire in the rain!) I got rid of those after a year. My wife's 14' Civic came with some kind of Hankooks that I had to replace around 25K miles after two different punctures in the tread area (One caused by a stone in the road) and rapid tread wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Those tires are absolute garbage in the snow! I replaced mine after 15 months and 16K miles with the same BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT mentioned above (Sam's Club had a nice instant rebate on them at the end of October) and I'm looking forward to seeing how well they work when the frozen stuff stats flying.
Honda seems to be pretty good at putting rotten tires on their vehicles. My 07' Element came with GoodYear Wrangler HP's (The joke on the Element forums was that HP stood for Hydroplane and they weren't kidding there. Talk about a scary tire in the rain!) I got rid of those after a year. My wife's 14' Civic came with some kind of Hankooks that I had to replace around 25K miles after two different punctures in the tread area (One caused by a stone in the road) and rapid tread wear.
Last week, the Honda dealer agreed to go half and half with me on a new set of Continental TrueContact Tour tires. Not snows, but way better winter ratings than the Bridgestones and they last mcuh longer. Not sure when they will call me to set up the time for the swap. Hopefully soon.

Also, I do understand economics. The factory tires are not cheap - they are actually more expensive than the ones that work better in the type of weather AWD is designed to handle. But, they are quiet and efficient. The Honda engineers must live in California... FWD versus AWD is not the issue either. AWD should perform better than FWD on the same roads, not worse.
 

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The one thing I'm regretting about my Honda purchase is that I didn't do any real research on the AWD system. The Rogue I traded in was an absolute animal in the snow. Acceleration up hills covered in deep snow and braking in snow were fantastic, almost like driving in dry conditions. The car was like the Honey Badger... didn't give a shit.

The only time I ever slid into a ditch, the AWD system got me out of it in barely a minute, despite the tires being practically bald at the time. The vehicle had 47,000 miles in January 2017, all on the orignal stock Continental 4X4 all season tires. They were really due for replacement, but I was stubborn and wanted to stretch them out to 50,000, which I did. By the time I replaced them six months later, they could no longer pass inspection and were slippery in light rain conditions. That was an interesting six months, LOL. I replaced them with Cooper CS5 Ultra V-rated tires, which were pretty damn good, but never gave me the full confidence that I had in the Conti 4x4s when they were new. The Coopers were smoother and quieter and I never skidded with them in 19,000 miles, but I always felt like I was about to skid around curves in rain. In the snow they were definitely just as good as the Continentials.

The impression I'm getting is that Subaru is the indisputable king of AWD, and Nissan is a clear second. Honda is third at best. It's a shame Nissan can't get their crap together and build a decent transmission. Their overall cheap design and fit/finish issues also make them undesirable, but for simply building a good engine and good AWD system, I'm really missing my Rogue already as I watch snow falling from the sky for the second day in a row in New York. And I've had my new Honda less than two weeks at this point.
 

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The one thing I'm regretting about my Honda purchase is that I didn't do any real research on the AWD system. The Rogue I traded in was an absolute animal in the snow. Acceleration up hills covered in deep snow and braking in snow were fantastic, almost like driving in dry conditions. The car was like the Honey Badger... didn't give a shit.
1) 5th gen AWD was significantly upgraded, so make sure all those comparison videos you're probably watching are not on older generations.

2) The real world practical nature of AWD performance vs those goofy tests with wheels on rollers or at funny angles remind me of a story. I was talking to someone in R&D at a major national laundry detergent manufacturer who said that the reality is most premium laundry detergent performs the same under real world conditions. Each of the brands picks a specific stain, whether it's wine, ketchup, grass, etc that their product is extra optimized on, because they know those side by side comparisons they use during commercials will falsely convince consumers "if it works better on grass/ketchup/whatever it must work better all the time".

The AWD comparison videos remind me exactly of this. If it works on assembly line rollers or in concrete rain ditches, it must be better for real world use? I do believe that the tests are real and accurate. Just... The scenarios are so abstract.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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The one thing I'm regretting about my Honda purchase is that I didn't do any real research on the AWD system. The Rogue I traded in was an absolute animal in the snow. Acceleration up hills covered in deep snow and braking in snow were fantastic, almost like driving in dry conditions. The car was like the Honey Badger... didn't give a shit.

The only time I ever slid into a ditch, the AWD system got me out of it in barely a minute, despite the tires being practically bald at the time. The vehicle had 47,000 miles in January 2017, all on the orignal stock Continental 4X4 all season tires. They were really due for replacement, but I was stubborn and wanted to stretch them out to 50,000, which I did. By the time I replaced them six months later, they could no longer pass inspection and were slippery in light rain conditions. That was an interesting six months, LOL. I replaced them with Cooper CS5 Ultra V-rated tires, which were pretty damn good, but never gave me the full confidence that I had in the Conti 4x4s when they were new. The Coopers were smoother and quieter and I never skidded with them in 19,000 miles, but I always felt like I was about to skid around curves in rain. In the snow they were definitely just as good as the Continentials.

The impression I'm getting is that Subaru is the indisputable king of AWD, and Nissan is a clear second. Honda is third at best. It's a shame Nissan can't get their crap together and build a decent transmission. Their overall cheap design and fit/finish issues also make them undesirable, but for simply building a good engine and good AWD system, I'm really missing my Rogue already as I watch snow falling from the sky for the second day in a row in New York. And I've had my new Honda less than two weeks at this point.
Buyers remorse? Or nitpicking? I can't tell for sure.

Tip: Nissan and Subaru have their own particular issues with their CUVs/SUVs too. Some serious, some minor. But if AWD is your only real want and concern.... I don't know why you did not research AWD across the competition before buying.

Personally, I find the gen5 AWD to be excellent, particularly in wet weather conditions. It is much more advanced then the AWD on my old gen3. I like how the gen5 AWD is not passive most of the time... it actually is active everytime I step on the gas from a stop at an intersection and I have watched it in my traction display on my instrument cluster and it is very dynamic and smart about how it applies and adjusts traction between front and back wheels. It is NOT 4WD.. but I knew that in advance, and honestly... it does not need to be.

I also do not understand whay you keep expecting a general purpose OEM tire to be your personal winter wonder either.

As for issues with tires... this has already been asked, answered, and reanswered. Factory OEM tires generally are always all weather tires, and generally not the best of the best either. Reason: vehicle manufacturers build for the masses, not for specific drivers... so they put what they feel is most generically appropriate on the vehicles at the factory. I live in California, and my Hankooks are working fine so far, wearing well, and handle well in wet weather.. so I am happy with them. When it is time to replace them though... I will be putting a highly rated Michelin all weather tire on the CRV. Snow is not an issue for me, but if it was.. I would be doing what a lot of other owners of SUV owners (not just Honda SUVs) and get a set of steel rims and put snow tires on for the winter and swap them over. AWD and good quality snow tires would serve most owners very well... and when spring comes.. swap back to the factory tires.
 

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I nitpick everyting, LOL. It's not really buyer's remorse as much as it is I don't think I was really done with the Nissan I traded in. It's like trading in a wife for a newer model from a different designer. I still like the old one a lot, flaws and all. I look at the new Honda parked in the garage and it's beautiful to me. There were clearly things about the Rogue that annoyed me, and you're completely correct, Nissan and Subaru have their own particular issues. I know the Nissan problems inside and out from 6+ years of research and reading the internet and having owned the vehicle.

AWD is certainly not my ONLY concern, but I had read general comments that people liked the Honda AWD system, and I guess I just assumed it would be equivalent to what I had in the Rogue. I just overlooked it and failed to pay much attention during the buying process. It was only upon delivery that I found out there's no transfer case in the Honda, nor is there an AWD Lock button for keeping power distribution 50/50 front/rear at low speeds. I would guess I probably only drive in severe weather about five times a winter on average, so it's not really a big deal, and not worth the trouble of buying a dedicated set of snow tires. But with all season stock tires on newer cars being as wide as they are now, AWD is definitely something I need more than I really want. A smaller FWD car with narrow tires (175/185/195) like a 1980s or early 90s Camry/Corolla/Civic/Accord/Sentra would be fine for me, even without dedicated snow tires, but wider tires on larger modern FWD vehicles have a crippling effect in the snow on stock tires. So AWD is definitely on my list as a necessity.

I'm glad to know the gen5 AWD is not passive and will be active from a stationary start. I don't remember if it was on this forum, but I recall reading recently that the Honda AWD system is FWD always UNTIL it senses some slippage, and then uses the propeller to send some power to the rear wheels. That would be fine if there was also an AWD Lock button to override the system and start at 50/50 when stuck in a ditch. It was the combination of both those things - thinking it starts 100% FWD and there's no way for the driver to outsmart the computer - that bothered me. I hope you're right and that other information was wrong. Maybe I was reading information about a previous generation CR-V. I really don't remember.

The first generation Rogue was typically 50/50 when hitting the pedal hard from a stop at an intersection until it got up to speed, then would change to 80/20 or 90/10. When accelerating gently from a stop, it would probably start 80/20 and just stay there, but it was hard to tell most of the time, because my Rogue didn't have the traction display on the dash, and neither does my CR-V LX. I was only going by feel all the time, and only when I was actively thinking about it, which wasn't often. Later model Rogues have the display, and there has been some discussion on a Nissan forum I visit that the AWD system was reprogrammed drastically for the 2019 model year compared to 2008-18. I don't really know if that's true, because I've never driven a second generation Rogue.
 

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Subaru has changed their AWD prorgaming over the years so many times it would make your head spin, it can also be different from one model another.

I’ve had a bunch of Subaru’s just sold one to buy a CRV, I don’t want to deal with blown head gaskets, loud and unreliable CVTs, oil consumption, valve spring problems, blown turbos, etc.

If you look at real on road comparisons between several of the popular AWD brands, it shows the difference isn’t that much. Each may work better in certain conditions, but overall they still did everything they were expected to.

Mazda wanted to leapfrog past Subaru’s AWD reputation, so they put a ton of time and effort in a new system, it worked and drove well. But all the brands made it around the different courses in great fashion.

Last year my wife complained horribly about driving her Subaru in the snow and ice, I bought winter tires and it was a different car. The problem was directional control and braking, getting stuck never came into play.
 
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