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Purchased 12/16/18. 9,035 miles. Sat in heated garage for 32 days during Nov. Returned to find battery dead. Charged for 3 days. Started and drove to dealer. Battery failed tester. Dealer replaced 280 amp battery with a 500 amp battery (HON 31500-SR1-100m). Total charge of $174 covered under warranty.

Thankful we didn't drive the CRV through mountains or could have been stuck out in the mountains with a dead undersized battery.
 

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I highly recommend you get yourself a smart battery monitor. These are available on Amazon, and are not expensive. Our CR-V's exert a small amount of battery draw 24/7, as all modern computer controlled cars do. The CR-V comes with a Group 51R battery, which is one of the smallest batteries made for cars. Most batteries cannot sit for a month and not die. A good monitor will plug into the wall and intelligently maintain the charge as long as needed, charging only when needed. Or, if you want something better, you can transplant a larger battery in. There are several good threads on this. Here are a couple:

https://www.crvownersclub.com/threads/51-battery-replacement.185770/

https://www.crvownersclub.com/threads/larger-group-24-battery-install.35034/

https://www.crvownersclub.com/threads/3rd-gen-crv-bigger-battery-upgrade.192589/

Somewhere amongst these threads is info for every year model. You can upgrade any number of ways. The 24F battery is much larger and has more reserve, and comes stock in the Odyssey, and instructions are there in the threads for upgrading using OEM Honda Parts. I have bought the parts (for about $25) and will be doing the upgrade to a 24F at the next battery change. If you really want to improve the system, it's the way to go. It does require a little aptitude to do the work, but is pretty easy. Every year CR-V has always come with this same tiny battery, but the cars have much more of an electronic load on them nowadays, so it only makes sense - to me, anyway. Or, if you don't want to go this route, the monitor should solve the issue adequately.
 

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I have a CTEK smart charger and permanently installed plugs in all vehicles, wired directly to the battery terminals. So I just cycle the charger between vehicles with a minimum effort. Be it cars, bikes, lawn mowers etc.
 
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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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Purchased 12/16/18. 9,035 miles. Sat in heated garage for 32 days during Nov. Returned to find battery dead. Charged for 3 days. Started and drove to dealer. Battery failed tester. Dealer replaced 280 amp battery with a 500 amp battery (HON 31500-SR1-100m). Total charge of $174 covered under warranty.

Thankful we didn't drive the CRV through mountains or could have been stuck out in the mountains with a dead undersized battery.
There are batteries that fail prematurely, but in the case described by you above.. your parking it for a month left alone (regardless of ambient temperature).. killed the battery prematurely.

1) The battery amperage you are quoting above is NOT stored capacity in amps, but rather is it cold cranking amps, which is an objective measure of starting capacity, not total battery capacity. The HON 31500-SR1-100m is also a 51R battery, and has no more reserve capacity vs the one that was replaced. The factory batteries are spec'ed with a CCA of 410, but typically will read around 520 when new. As for actual stored capacity this battery is spec'ed for an 85 minute reserve capacity (at spec load of 25 amps). That means this new battery is as vulnerable to slow normal parasitic discharge as your original battey the shipped with your CRV. If the dealer tested your original battery and found a CCA below 375... it's a failing battery... in your case.. apparently 280... which means it has high resistance internally.. due to sulfation and other plate damage.

2) The Charge life on a 51R battery (which is the stock battery in gen5 CRVs is ~ 30-35 days when installed in a gen5 CRV. Why? Normal powered down standby parasitic current on a properly functioning gen5 CRV is ~35-50mas. If you do the math.. that means a 51R battery will literally be pulled down to near zero voltage level in the period of time you stated you left your vehicle parked... and that assumes it actually was fully charged when you last parked it and turned off the motor.

Once you fully discharge a flooded cell vehicle battery... they often will never come back to full health. Unlike deep cycle batteries used in marine application.. vehicle batteries do not like to be discharged below 11 vdc (~10% reminaing charge) ever. That kind of discharge litterally damages the battery, often beyond recovery.

3) IF you are going to leave a gen5 CRV (really, any modern motor vehicle) sitting for more then two weeks parked.. I strongly recommend you put a smart trickle charger on it. Otherwise.. you will see this issue once again.

The nature of modern vehicles is that even fully in standby mode after turning them off.. they continue to draw some current to continue to power all the electronics systems in low power mode. Nature of the industry now days... and there are no batteries that can mitigate this.

You could switch up to an H5 class flooded cell battery (what they put in new Accords for the same engine and systems).. but even with that.. you only get an additional 20-30% more reserve stored charge. Very few car batteries offered in the market have more than 120 minutes of reserve charged (measured at 25 amp load).
 
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