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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new 2018 CRV EX-L and while I generally like the car, and the gas millage has generally been good I am troubled by a few things.

(1) First the "Range" indicator on the display is completely inaccurate and this drives me bonkers. When I first filled it up, it indicated the "Range" of the vehicle to be 443 miles. This "range" always decreases faster than the actual miles driven, however, so by the time it hits "0" the car has typically gone between 370-390 miles.

(2) I also know that when the Range hits "0" there are still 2 gallons left in the tank left though, and then it just sits at zero after that even as you can still continue to drive, which also drives me crazy. Is there any way to set things so that the range accurately reflects how far you can actually drive?

(3) And this is the real reason I came here, which is that I've now had the car for about 5 months and have driven it about 5000 miles and the "Range" indicator after a full tank has been slowly trending downwards since I've owned the vehicle. It slipped to 440 after a full tank very quickly, and then 434. The last time I filled up just yesterday it indicated that the "Range" was now 428. What could be causing this? Why would the "Range" be decreasing when I am putting in the exact same amounts of gas every time - and I even tried to top it off and squeeze a little extra gas in to see if that would make the range go back up, but it did not.

I am even wondering if this is some kind of pre-programmed decline designed to reflect that your car is supposed to become less fuel efficient over time. But this seems extreme even to me.

Any ideas here? Thank you so much.
 

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2018 Honda CRV EX-L
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421 Posts
Mine range fluctuates some. I'm guessing it is based upon what my mileage was during the prior fill up. Just a wild guess. After some city driving, and then while driving on the highway the range can actually remain constant for awhile.
 

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I think the range is determined from 'real time' numbers the computer is seeing based on how you're driving.
If I fill up just before going to see our son down San Diego way, the range is typically say in the 390 range. This would be after filling up on a tank that has mostly been driven in the city. Hop on the freeway with only the short 2 mi drive from the gas station on the new fill up, get the car up to cruising speed and the MPG's jump up to 27-28 after a few miles of driving and the range increases to over 400+ miles. Based on this observation, it tells me that the computer is basing the estimates on how the car is being driven real time. I find it a challenge to get the MPG's up over 30 on our drives south by the time we get to our son's house. After going down and back a fill up will typically give a range over 450+ miles, IF I've been able to keep the MPG's up in the high 20's low 30's.
 

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2016 CRV Touring AWD
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Throw in winter gas as well. WG causes loss in mpg as well.
 

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I brought this up this week with my dealers service department. Needless to say I’m not happy with their justification nor do I believe it’s the result of a change in weather or driving conditions! The day I drove the vehicle home I decided I like the mpg view on the instrument panel. The panel that day showed that I was averaging 27.8 mpg and had 338 miles remaining on an almost full tank. Since then the highest range number on a newly filled tank that I’ve seen is 338 and every month or so the mpg declines slightly. The first 8 months it seemed to sit around 26.9 mpg and now the highest it will go is 25.5. I drive the EXACT same stretch of road 5 days a week under almost the same conditions. I haven’t developed a heavy foot and have had my CRV in the shop for the scheduled maintenance plus a long list of other issues more than I’ve had it on the road. As such I don’t think it’s engine or tire wear that’s causing my mpg to creep down. The only reason I purchase the CRV after owning a Honda Element for 15 years was because the gas mileage had significantly improved. My Element got a whopping 18 mpg and I had to fill the tiny tank sometimes twice a week (I only drive 12 miles each way to work during the week and put about 15 miles on the vehicle on the weekend). Since it appeared the tiny tank and gas mileage had been addressed in the new CRV I enthusiastically drove one off the lot. Regretting that decision with each passing day! At the rate my gas mileage is declining I will be getting the same 18 mpg right around the time I pay it off. Needless to say it will be traded in for something that actually works the same way on day one as it does on day four thousand and forty one!
 

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2019 Acura RDX Aspec
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1, the range indicator will base the calculation of the last mpg trip etc. i clear on every pump.

2 the tank at zero is a mystery some say they can go to a reserve tank but i dont think its as accurate as older meters... cliff note dont go to zero

3. winter gas blends efffect mpg
auto starting effects mpg
idling effects mpg
lots of variables .. my mpg in warmer temps are much better and i run the ac non stop but winter on same trips with heat and winter blend im about 5/6mpg lower
 

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1, the range indicator will base the calculation of the last mpg trip etc. i clear on every pump.

2 the tank at zero is a mystery some say they can go to a reserve tank but i dont think its as accurate as older meters... cliff note dont go to zero

3. winter gas blends efffect mpg
auto starting effects mpg
idling effects mpg
lots of variables .. my mpg in warmer temps are much better and i run the ac non stop but winter on same trips with heat and winter blend im about 5/6mpg lower
Thanks for the input. I don’t use the auto start feature because I dont know how and was told these newer vehicles don’t really need any time to “warm up” like older model cars did. I also don’t use the heat very often as I’m usually hot just because, so I use the ac in the summer but rarely find a need to turn on the heated seats or heater itself in the winter. I do use defrost if the windshield needs it which is about 80% of the time since my vehicle has condensation on both the inside and outside windows regardless of whether I’m in it or not. I would also like to add that I have never used regular unleaded gasoline. Since day one I have only put premium (89 or above octane) fuel in my CRV so I would think it would get the best gas mileage based on that factor alone. I know my Honda Element got markedly better gas mileage when I filled the tank with premium.
My honest opinion is my gas mileage is going down because with time I have more weight and wind resistance because I think it’s taking on water in multiple places and these places must be multiplying and add to the wind resistance. It’s been in the service center 15 times in the past year and a half because my seatbelt is always wet after it rains and my passenger side floor mats are damp. Also my service indicator failure lights go nuts if I’m driving in the rain. My door seals are all misaligned and I just had both rear tail light assemblies replaced because they were a pass thru conduit for the water being redirected off the top of the car during inclement weather. After arguing with the service center for more than a year that the insides of my tail lights should not be soaking wet they finally pulled one off and found it was improperly seated and thus replaced them both. I’m sure water dripping in through the holes the lights go through has accumulated and shouldn’t have occurred but getting the service center to acknowledge any problem with my lemon is about as easy as extracting your wisdom teeth at home with a pair of pliers! 35 years of Honda excellence has been wiped away in just over a year post owning my 2018 CRV. I feel sad in a way that I’m being forced to say good bye to my reliable old companion but will not be taking another new Honda to the dealer every other day once I pay this monstrosity off.
 

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I frequent several different vehicle forums to stay up to date on the ones I own, or are interested in.

The fuel mileage tracking and reporting systems in most cars aren’t extremely accurate. People that compare it to actual fuel used commonly report them being .5 mpg to 2.0 off. Change tire size, idle a little bit longer, winter fuel, being a little more frisky one day, etc, will rapidly change the readout.

The estimate is just a best guess made by prior trips and whatever software the computer uses.

The computer on my company car has the longe term mpg readout, then flashes the mpg for the current trip when you turn the car off. The two figures can be extremely different.
 

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I frequent several different vehicle forums to stay up to date on the ones I own, or are interested in.

The fuel mileage tracking and reporting systems in most cars aren’t extremely accurate. People that compare it to actual fuel used commonly report them being .5 mpg to 2.0 off. Change tire size, idle a little bit longer, winter fuel, being a little more frisky one day, etc, will rapidly change the readout.

The estimate is just a best guess made by prior trips and whatever software the computer uses.

The computer on my company car has the longe term mpg readout, then flashes the mpg for the current trip when you turn the car off. The two figures can be extremely different.
Thank you - I can wrap my head around that reasoning! I also admit to all the digital gauges and sensor accessories installed in cars now as new technology to me. I’m sure there’s a learning curve for this stuff and I’m working hard at catching myself up but since cars aren’t my passion probably didn’t read my manual as soon as I should’ve after trading in a 15 year old Honda for a new one. I really appreciate your patience and value your response!
 

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I track my mileage through fuelly.com. I use one of the trip meters to track the miles driven between filling up the gas tank, and then divide miles driven by gallons of fuel added. Then I reset the trip meter and leave it until the next fill up.
 

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2019 CR-V EX
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My V offers great economy. It gets me from point A to point B reliably and it's fun to drive. That's all that really matters.

There isn't one vehicle on this planet that is dead nuts accurate all the time in economy readings. Too many variables for consistency. For those who drive the same route, at the same time, at the same speed, again and again, and see fluctuations in fuel econ, then seasonal fuel blends, traffic, and weather play some part in it.

When I bought my V, I was told by the salesman that the fuel econ readouts are to be used as an estimate only, which is correct. I've owned multiple vehicles and all of them varied where fuel econ readouts were and actual fuel econ is concerned.
 

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Thanks for the input. I don’t use the auto start feature because I dont know how and was told these newer vehicles don’t really need any time to “warm up” like older model cars did. I also don’t use the heat very often as I’m usually hot just because, so I use the ac in the summer but rarely find a need to turn on the heated seats or heater itself in the winter. I do use defrost if the windshield needs it which is about 80% of the time since my vehicle has condensation on both the inside and outside windows regardless of whether I’m in it or not. I would also like to add that I have never used regular unleaded gasoline. Since day one I have only put premium (89 or above octane) fuel in my CRV so I would think it would get the best gas mileage based on that factor alone. I know my Honda Element got markedly better gas mileage when I filled the tank with premium.
My honest opinion is my gas mileage is going down because with time I have more weight and wind resistance because I think it’s taking on water in multiple places and these places must be multiplying and add to the wind resistance. It’s been in the service center 15 times in the past year and a half because my seatbelt is always wet after it rains and my passenger side floor mats are damp. Also my service indicator failure lights go nuts if I’m driving in the rain. My door seals are all misaligned and I just had both rear tail light assemblies replaced because they were a pass thru conduit for the water being redirected off the top of the car during inclement weather. After arguing with the service center for more than a year that the insides of my tail lights should not be soaking wet they finally pulled one off and found it was improperly seated and thus replaced them both. I’m sure water dripping in through the holes the lights go through has accumulated and shouldn’t have occurred but getting the service center to acknowledge any problem with my lemon is about as easy as extracting your wisdom teeth at home with a pair of pliers! 35 years of Honda excellence has been wiped away in just over a year post owning my 2018 CRV. I feel sad in a way that I’m being forced to say good bye to my reliable old companion but will not be taking another new Honda to the dealer every other day once I pay this monstrosity off.
I don't think running 89 octane is going to help you any. Mine purrs like a kitten on 87 octane and I get excellent economy with it as well. The only thing I can suggest is that you use a Top Tier brand because they have better detergents added to their fuels,.
 
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