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Discussion Starter #1
The glove box door on my '19 has a big, nasty scuff and I would like to replace it.

Is this a difficult job, requiring a lot of dash dis-assembly, or can a competent DIYer do it themself ?

I've scoured the 'Net looking for instructions but have had no luck finding anything.


Thanks.
 

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When I open and release the tabs i wonder if a hinge is on to take the bolt/screws a re holding it? can be as simple as a few screws..
 

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I had my glove box replaced under warranty and was watching the tech do it. The glove box only comes as the inside box, the front cover gets switched over from the old box so the scuff will still be there so you need to also buy the outside trim and also the lock needs to be switched over
 

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look at steps 2 to 5.

https://www.collegehillshonda.com/instructions/crv/2019/interiorillumination.pdf

If you have the touring, careful when pulling down the bottom trim cover as there's a light attached to it with a cable.
Heh... observation segway: makes you wonder at these cars fully assembled at the factory so consistently and reliably, and how quickly they can assemble one these days. So many things all nestled and interdependent. Of course they have a specific assembly process they follow... but it still amazes me. It also illustrates why Tesla was having so much trouble with "over automation" in assembly on their vehicles (Musk wanted a fully robotic assembly goal, even though all the big manufacturers have proven over the years that some things are better assembled by humans). Tesla ended up scrapping hundreds of millions of dollars in robotic assembly and replacing it with actual workers, particularly on their Model 3 lines. This is a case where Musk's penchant for innovation came back and bit him hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
look at steps 2 to 5.

If you have the touring, careful when pulling down the bottom trim cover as there's a light attached to it with a cable.
Thanks for the link. Just as I feared, "clips" are involved. They can be a real PITA.
 

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Heh... observation segway: makes you wonder at these cars fully assembled at the factory so consistently and reliably, and how quickly they can assemble one these days. So many things all nestled and interdependent. Of course they have a specific assembly process they follow... but it still amazes me. It also illustrates why Tesla was having so much trouble with "over automation" in assembly on their vehicles (Musk wanted a fully robotic assembly goal, even though all the big manufacturers have proven over the years that some things are better assembled by humans). Tesla ended up scrapping hundreds of millions of dollars in robotic assembly and replacing it with actual workers, particularly on their Model 3 lines. This is a case where Musk's penchant for innovation came back and bit him hard.
I worked as a Product/Design engineer for one of the big OEM's for 35 years. Much of the industry has gone "modular" over the last couple decades vs. "back in the old days" when so much was built up by hand, piece by piece. I remember when the module craze first began for us with the advent of modular door systems, that was a big deal as it saved close to 4 min. of assembly line time (aka labor).

Musk has failed at many of his "bright ideas" because he has zero experience with real world assembly operations. He is getting some hard lessons, and often deservedly so. "Concept" and "reality" sometimes don't like to play together.
 
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