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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

Been trying to figure this one out, but haven't found a solution on the forums or the interwebs as of yet.

I find myself needing to leave my parking lights on either for perimeter lighting while loading things into/out of the vehicle, or to provide better visibility of my vehicle while it is parked beyond the hazard lights or in situations that don't need overly-bright flashing lights where simple markers will suffice. Only problem is, I can't get the lights to stay on after exiting the vehicle and the only configuration option I could find was the headlight auto-off timer which has a longest setting of 60 seconds and no option to disable it. Am I missing something here or does someone know how to keep these lights on after exiting the vehicle beyond leaving the keyfob in the vehicle?

One would think that setting a switch to "on" would mean something will actually stay on and not turn off on you every 60seconds ....:rolleyes:
 

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I would think that the lighting system has auto shut-off to preserve the battery. Perhaps try running the emergency blinking lights for high visibility when you are stopped, or park somewhere that eliminates the need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would think that the lighting system has auto shut-off to preserve the battery. Perhaps try running the emergency blinking lights for high visibility when you are stopped, or park somewhere that eliminates the need.
10 min of led parking lights left on is not going to kill a car battery... this just seems like an oversight.

Emergency blinking lights are also not very helpful for perimeter lighting in dark situations beyond blinding you and in situations where high visibility is required, having the addition of parking lights would increase your visibility (such as while putting on snow-chains).


try leaving the drivers door open
While this works, it doesn’t eliminate the door chime and does not work well when raining, snowing, or if you wish to lock your vehicle.
 

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10 min of led parking lights left on is not going to kill a car battery... this just seems like an oversight.

Emergency blinking lights are also not very helpful for perimeter lighting in dark situations beyond blinding you and in situations where high visibility is required, having the addition of parking lights would increase your visibility (such as while putting on snow-chains).



While this works, it doesn’t eliminate the door chime and does not work well when raining, snowing, or if you wish to lock your vehicle.
leave the engine running then.... and take your fob and lock the door. No battery drain...
I think that also has a timer... that will shut off the engine and lights. Don't know how long but it is not short... (if I'm not mistaken)
My dad.. a while back had left his truck running over the weekend... found out when I came out to go to work, and heard it humming along...

and I agree, get those battery operated utility lights from costco, autozone or home depot... the bigger the better... :)... with that, you even have lights while your under the car or rooftop or under the hood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
leave the engine running then.... and take your fob and lock the door. No battery drain...
I think that also has a timer... that will shut off the engine and lights. Don't know how long but it is not short... (if I'm not mistaken)
My dad.. a while back had left his truck running over the weekend... found out when I came out to go to work, and heard it humming along...

and I agree, get those battery operated utility lights from costco, autozone or home depot... the bigger the better... :)... with that, you even have lights while your under the car or rooftop or under the hood.
That’s a pretty convoluted solution for something that should simply function and I don’t plan to drive around everywhere wearing a headlamp.

In experimenting, it also appears that turning on accessory mode for the vehicle creating quite a bit more drain on the battery allows you to run the parking lamps for at least 15min. From there I had to use the manual backup key to lock the door and you can only unlock the car then with the manual key, the fob will not work.

It seems in an attempt to “stupid proof” the vehicle, a standard function was removed/made unusable which is surprising to me for Honda.
 

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It's not an oversight. It's to protect people from themselves much like not letting you lock the door with fob inside, Mm, sensing, etc. Honda, damned if they do,damned if they don't. Can't please everyone.
Absolutely agree with this. If Honda did not put in common sense safeguards to protect owners from negative consequences of carelessness or just plain silly ....... there would be many many more complaints about how stupid Honda to not protect careless owners from themselves with careless mistakes. Personally, I find all the safeguards against "careless" to be very well thought out in the current generation CRV, and have saved me some grief on a few occasions.

This whole thread discussion comes down to one owner wanting things in a volume production vehicle to be exactly to their personal design specifications. It's interesting discussion, but not compelling in any way because the fact is... you are not supposed to leave electronics, lights, etc. active in a modern motor vehicle while the engine is turned off.

You don't get personal wants/needs customized as features and design in a large scale production motor vehicle. You get a well thought out common set of features and settings to appeal to the most owners. To expect, or demand, otherwise is.... well.. not in sync with the realities of mass production vehicles. This is exactly why vehicle shoppers have choices in the market, and are encouraged to completely test drive and evaluate a vehicle before purchasing or leasing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Absolutely agree with this. If Honda did not put in common sense safeguards to protect owners from negative consequences of carelessness or just plain silly ....... there would be many many more complaints about how stupid Honda to not protect careless owners from themselves with careless mistakes. Personally, I find all the safeguards against "careless" to be very well thought out in the current generation CRV, and have saved me some grief on a few occasions.

This whole thread discussion comes down to one owner wanting things in a volume production vehicle to be exactly to their personal design specifications. It's interesting discussion, but not compelling in any way because the fact is... you are not supposed to leave electronics, lights, etc. active in a modern motor vehicle while the engine is turned off.

You don't get personal wants/needs customized as features and design in a large scale production motor vehicle. You get a well thought out common set of features and settings to appeal to the most owners. To expect, or demand, otherwise is.... well.. not in sync with the realities of mass production vehicles. This is exactly why vehicle shoppers have choices in the market, and are encouraged to completely test drive and evaluate a vehicle before purchasing or leasing.
I would tend to agree, however in a well engineered vehicle the option would be available to configure the vehicle for how a particular user would use that vehicle within reason. That does not prevent Honda from providing a default setting that protects this other group of users who may forget that they left those lights on, but to completely remove a functionality for something that is not a significant power draw and is commonly used in some markets, this seems silly for the functionality loss. My feeling is that their original intent was to have this timer affect the primary “headlights” as the timer is labeled in the user manual vs the “parking lamps” thus my standpoint of it being an oversight. It’s also interesting that as soon as you have any interaction with the vehicle after the maximum 60 second timer, the lights come back on...

I also have to touch on “you are not supposed to leave electronics, lights, etc. active in a modern motor vehicle while the engine is turned off”

This is factually incorrect. Not only with the advancements in technology and the shift to LED lighting, but most modern vehicles have electronics which continue to function in the background with the engine off that the common user is unaware of such as the information gathering and uploading of data via wifi which is present in this vehicle and others such as Tesla. It’s just manufacturers prioritizing resources for their own purposes. Most law enforcement vehicles function for many hours with a significant additional amount of power draw and they do not always have a second battery in place to run these systems. Power draw is not an excuse in this case.
 

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I would tend to agree, however in a well engineered vehicle the option would be available to configure the vehicle for how a particular user would use that vehicle within reason. That does not prevent Honda from providing a default setting that protects this other group of users who may forget that they left those lights on, but to completely remove a functionality for something that is not a significant power draw and is commonly used in some markets, this seems silly for the functionality loss. My feeling is that their original intent was to have this timer affect the primary “headlights” as the timer is labeled in the user manual vs the “parking lamps” thus my standpoint of it being an oversight. It’s also interesting that as soon as you have any interaction with the vehicle after the maximum 60 second timer, the lights come back on...

I also have to touch on “you are not supposed to leave electronics, lights, etc. active in a modern motor vehicle while the engine is turned off”

This is factually incorrect. Not only with the advancements in technology and the shift to LED lighting, but most modern vehicles have electronics which continue to function in the background with the engine off that the common user is unaware of such as the information gathering and uploading of data via wifi which is present in this vehicle and others such as Tesla. It’s just manufacturers prioritizing resources for their own purposes. Most law enforcement vehicles function for many hours with a significant additional amount of power draw and they do not always have a second battery in place to run these systems. Power draw is not an excuse in this case.
The LED lights themselves do not drain the battery. The driver powering up the LED lights can drain the battery.
Many people think wattage is everything but it's not. An HID bulb can draw 35w and/or 1amp. But start-up draws 5 amps.

You have a 30w LED circuit powered by a 12volt driver. W/V=A.
30/12 = 2.5 amps. However, your circuit isn't just your parking lights but the interior which includes radio, low beam headlights, interior lights, security system, proximity sensors, etc.

PS. Tesla's UI is useless when it's autoupdating info to their servers since they draw vampire current to "keep their batteries working" when all it's doing is cycling them faster than your average EV that their own software will not take into account if you're doing a warranty claim on battery life loss overtime.
 

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I would tend to agree, however in a well engineered vehicle the option would be available to configure the vehicle for how a particular user would use that vehicle within reason. ..... My feeling is that their original intent was to have this timer affect the primary “headlights” as the timer is labeled in the user manual vs the “parking lamps” thus my standpoint of it being an oversight. It’s also interesting that as soon as you have any interaction with the vehicle after the maximum 60 second timer, the lights come back on...
You are of course entitled to believe anything you like... but that does not mean that for a family of vehicles (all modern Hondas operate this same way) where North America volumes alone are over a million per year.... your way is the right way.

Honda has clearly put a lot of human engineering effort into their features and safeguards... to appeal and support the broadest range of owners. No matter what choices they make.. some owners will complain... evidence: this thread.

I disagree that owners should be able to over-ride vehicle safeguards that are designed to protect an owner from coming back to a dead vehicle due to battery discharge. But if they did allow this.. the vehicle should also record this.. and it should immediately void your warranty on the battery... because one severe discharge of a flooded cell battery can in fact kill the battery, or at a minimum cause premature failure later on. Flooded cell batteries do not do well if fully discharged.

I also have to touch on “you are not supposed to leave electronics, lights, etc. active in a modern motor vehicle while the engine is turned off”

This is factually incorrect. Not only with the advancements in technology and the shift to LED lighting, but most modern vehicles have electronics which continue to function in the background with the engine off that the common user is unaware of such as the information gathering and uploading of data via wifi which is present in this vehicle and others such as Tesla. It’s just manufacturers prioritizing resources for their own purposes. Most law enforcement vehicles function for many hours with a significant additional amount of power draw and they do not always have a second battery in place to run these systems. Power draw is not an excuse in this case.
What is factually correct is that when the LED headlights are on.... several amps of current are being drawn from the battery. It's not simply a couple of low power LEDs here.. we are talking about an array of high power LEDs in the Honda Headlights, or a high power traditional bulb in units with no LED headlights. Not nearly as bad a current drain as the old sealed beam headlights of the old days... but NOT trivial either.

Simply opening the drivers door reactivates the vehicle and it draws several amps continuously until the door is closed... which is also why automated lighting both internal and external come on as well.

Further... the powerdown standby power of a gen5 CRV is ~30-50 ma. Not significant but also not trivial either as this alone would discharge a fully charged battery in ~ 30-35 days of a vehicle sitting idle. And this assumes the battery was at full charge and full capacity to begin with... which is generally NOT the case.

As for what Tesla does or does not do.. that is completely irrelevant to Hondas.

As for what law enforcement vehicles are configured for.. also not relevant to Hondas. Yes.. they can leave lights on for extended periods of time.. but they also have much larger base capacity installed, as well as high power charging systems to bring them back up to full charge in a reasonable drive time. A lot of systems are upgraded in law enforcement vehicles precisely because they see levels of abuse in day to day use not seen in consumer vehicles.
 

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That’s a pretty convoluted solution for something that should simply function and I don’t plan to drive around everywhere wearing a headlamp.

In experimenting, it also appears that turning on accessory mode for the vehicle creating quite a bit more drain on the battery allows you to run the parking lamps for at least 15min. From there I had to use the manual backup key to lock the door and you can only unlock the car then with the manual key, the fob will not work.

It seems in an attempt to “stupid proof” the vehicle, a standard function was removed/made unusable which is surprising to me for Honda.
I didn’t suggest you wear a headlamp while driving around, what I suggested is you buy a recharge battery lamp or a headlamp that you can use in case of emergencies or when light is needed. You can put those aside when not needed, There is a big space at the back where you can store those things.
Obviously you are hell bent on what you want and is not open for suggestions. Sell the CRV and get a Dodge or something already and save yourself from all this heartache.
 

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The LED lights themselves do not drain the battery. The driver powering up the LED lights can drain the battery.
Many people think wattage is everything but it's not. An HID bulb can draw 35w and/or 1amp. But start-up draws 5 amps.

You have a 30w LED circuit powered by a 12volt driver. W/V=A.
30/12 = 2.5 amps. However, your circuit isn't just your parking lights but the interior which includes radio, low beam headlights, interior lights, security system, proximity sensors, etc.

PS. Tesla's UI is useless when it's autoupdating info to their servers since they draw vampire current to "keep their batteries working" when all it's doing is cycling them faster than your average EV that their own software will not take into account if you're doing a warranty claim on battery life loss overtime.
True.. simply opening the drivers side door initiates a power up of all the CRVs systems. However, high intensity LED headlights DO draw a lot of current as well. You can test this for yourself by putting a volt meter on the battery, and watching the voltage drop several tenths of a volt on a fully charged battery when the driver side door is opened, and then turn on the headlight and see another couple of tenths of a volt drop on the battery. All normal for a flooded cell vehicle battery, and indicative of between 3-10 amps of current being drawn from the battery before the engine is turned on and the charging system begins to take over the load.
 

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I didn’t suggest you wear a headlamp while driving around, what I suggested is you buy a recharge battery lamp or a headlamp that you can use in case of emergencies or when light is needed. You can put those aside when not needed, There is a big space at the back where you can store those things.
Obviously you are hell bent on what you want and is not open for suggestions. Sell the CRV and get a Dodge or something already and save yourself from all this heartache.
A practical solution to a very specific and niche owner requirement. As opposed to demanding Honda design a vehicle exactly to the custom requirements of the original poster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You are of course entitled to believe anything you like... but that does not mean that for a family of vehicles (all modern Hondas operate this same way) where North America volumes alone are over a million per year.... your way is the right way.

Honda has clearly put a lot of human engineering effort into their features and safeguards... to appeal and support the broadest range of owners. No matter what choices they make.. some owners will complain... evidence: this thread.

I disagree that owners should be able to over-ride vehicle safeguards that are designed to protect an owner from coming back to a dead vehicle due to battery discharge. But if they did allow this.. the vehicle should also record this.. and it should immediately void your warranty on the battery... because one severe discharge of a flooded cell battery can in fact kill the battery, or at a minimum cause premature failure later on. Flooded cell batteries do not do well if fully discharged.



What is factually correct is that when the LED headlights are on.... several amps of current are being drawn from the battery. It's not simply a couple of low power LEDs here.. we are talking about an array of high power LEDs in the Honda Headlights, or a high power traditional bulb in units with no LED headlights. Not nearly as bad a current drain as the old sealed beam headlights of the old days... but NOT trivial either.

Simply opening the drivers door reactivates the vehicle and it draws several amps continuously until the door is closed... which is also why automated lighting both internal and external come on as well.

Further... the powerdown standby power of a gen5 CRV is ~30-50 ma. Not significant but also not trivial either as this alone would discharge a fully charged battery in ~ 30-35 days of a vehicle sitting idle. And this assumes the battery was at full charge and full capacity to begin with... which is generally NOT the case.

As for what Tesla does or does not do.. that is completely irrelevant to Hondas.

As for what law enforcement vehicles are configured for.. also not relevant to Hondas. Yes.. they can leave lights on for extended periods of time.. but they also have much larger base capacity installed, as well as high power charging systems to bring them back up to full charge in a reasonable drive time. A lot of systems are upgraded in law enforcement vehicles precisely because they see levels of abuse in day to day use not seen in consumer vehicles.
If you note my original question, I’m not asking about the high electrical-draw headlights of the vehicle, but the “parking lights” which present a fairly minimal load on the electrical system.
 

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If you note my original question, I’m not asking about the high electrical-draw headlights of the vehicle, but the “parking lights” which present a fairly minimal load on the electrical system.
You can't ask for parking lights without the computer staying active 24/7 listening for the "remote" to go from vampire mode to awake mode. Don't think in terms of wattage when it comes to LEDs because that's not their accurate description.
 
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