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Discussion Starter #1
I got a coupon for a $15 oil change from my local dealership recently so I brought it in. I've got 29k miles on my car and have been doing all the maintenance myself (Thanks Black Pearl!). The dealer told me I was due for a 30k tune up, which I know is bull from reading on these forums and actually calling Honda myself. I mean, this dealership actually has an option to put Nitrogen in my tires for $30, that air we breathe is 80% nitrogen...

Anyways, it did get me thinking about the MMI and what maintenance I should be doing, or thinking about doing down the road.

Here is the flyer they gave me:

http://www.sniperd.com/files/honda1.jpg

http://www.sniperd.com/files/honda2.jpg

Under the 30k the only things I think I need (and PLEASE correct me if I'm wrong) to actually do at some point are:

- Oil/filter (no problem, myself of local place, doing it every 7.5k miles)
- Tire rotate (I have Sam's club do it for free, 7.5k miles)
- Engine / Cabin filter (I check and do myself as needed)
- Rear Diff (I'm doing this every 15k miles, it cost like $13 in parts, Thanks again Black Pearl!)

The stuff I don't know when or how to do, or even I need to do:

-Lubricate seals and what not. What am I really doing here? Is it really needed? If so, what do I buy and what do I do?
-Inspect tires and reset pressures and record measurements. Is this just check your air? If so, ha, I got this one.
-Inspect breaks. All I ever used to do for this is just drive until I get that horrid squeaking and then get them replaced. Is it OK to stick with that?
-Transmission fluid. Do I change it, if so when? Does anybody have a simple write up on how/when to do this?
-Brake fluid. I'm nervous about this, I'm find paying them the $100 to have them do something that messes with saftey. But when do I do it? The manual says every 3 years, is that good? Or can I just do it at 60k miles or 90k?
-Battery service? I think not.
-It's not on the list but do I change my power steering?

Thank so much guys. This forum has saved me not only money but piece of mind. And I've gotten my wife to let me buy more tools! :)

As a side note I've sent in my 2nd oil sample to Blackstone Labs. The results of my first one are here: http://www.crvownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6200

Once I get my results I'll make another post.
 

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30k

Yup, do a trans. fluid drain and fill, its easy as an oil change, and no filter to deal with either.

Yup on the brake fluid as well, every 2-3 years unless you live in Arizona or equivalent desert climate, then 4-5 years is likely fine.

As far as the rest, I think youre on top of it.

Good luck, and please let us all know what you decided to do and how much it cost, etc. Thanks!
 

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Brake fluid needs replacing periodically because is it hydroscopic (or some sort of scientific term like that -- it sucks up moisture. That's a function of time and
humidity. You dealer sounds like it does a wallet inspection and gets there customer in the door with the cheap oil change where the mechanic can find all sorts of "problems" needing attention.

Overmaintaining a car doesn't hurt it. It just hurts your wallet. Recommending a tune up should be the first clue, unless this is Gen I and you're running conventional plugs.
 

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I have no idea what seals they lubricate on a CR-V. I do not think there are any! Sure the gas filler door and the 4 door hinges, door opener, both key cylinders and four latches use lithium grease from a spray can. Actually the key tumblers need graphite lock lube for best results and so your key does not stain your pants/pocket books. Then the tail gate hinges and hood need checking but all of these on vehicles that do not go off-road should be OK to 60k miles or more not in the Snow Belt.

On brake fluid it is definitely best done every 2 to 3 years but hardly anyone ever does it until the brake job is needed if at all. BTW just adding is not the same as a flush! If you live in areas where the humidity gets oppressive (dew point over 75F (?)) for prolonged periods definitely do it. If your fluid wet boiling point gets low enough from absorbing moisture your braking efficiency can drop to practically zero. That means almost no brakes! :eek:

Then again I read in Honda literature (? I think) where generically speaking the Honda fluid has extra moisture protection and can be serviceable for up to 10 years! Or was that the antifreeze? I think they were selling the Honda label brake fluid as opposed to aftermarket fluids. Heck just change it... The only caveat is the ABS. If you get air in the ABS it can be impossible to eliminate the air without exercising the ABS servos. Not sure if the CR-V is idiot proof or if the ABS need to be exercised. Another aspect is flushing the fluid in the ABS itself. Once the air is introduced in the fluid column between the reservoir and the bleeders it can become a problem to eliminate even more so in the ABS itself. Or it could be a piece of cake. Need experienced advice from actually doing it.

I bought a power bleeder that worked great on my Xtreme. They go from $55 for dedicated to near $100+ for the universal or professional set. Depending on the capacity of new fluid reservoir.

http://www.motiveproducts.com/

This might be the one that fits Honda CRV Gen 3:



European Bleeder 0100
In Stock
0100
Fits most European built cars $54.95

Works on most European cars, including Alfa Romeo, Audi, BMW, Fiat, Mercedes, Peugeot, Porsche, Renault, SAAB, Volkswagen, Volvo, and all other cars with 45mm threaded hydraulic fluid reservoir caps (This kit includes adapter 1100). All bleeders come with a full 1 year warranty.

OR this other separate adaptor might work again on Gen 3. I will check for sure if any one is interested.


Black Label GM/Ford 3-Tab Adapter 1118
In Stock
1118
Black Label ford 3-Tab Adapter $37.95


Our Black Label GM/Ford 3-Tab adapter is made from custom machined aluminum. Comes with everything you need to convert your existing POWER BLEEDER. Custom cap to fit most late model GM cars and trucks. Fits Cadillac's, Buick's, Chevrolet's, Oldsmobile's,Poniac's Saturn's, also fits 2005 + Ford Mustangs, Ships with two thickness gaskets, use the one that provides the tightest fit on your car. Please see application guide to determine correct fitment. Note: Power Bleeeders purchased before April 2008 will need p/n 0400 also. See related items below for a description of p/n 400.


These systems bleeders under low (< 20 PSI) do a nice job on the master and calipers but might not be sufficient to open the ABS valves so all the old brake fluid is flushed out.

You say let Honda do it? Be advised that it is highly possible the tech does not even have this rudimentary power bleeders and might just opt for a gravity flush. That just entails opening the bleeders and letting gravity drain the fluid. I know of a Mr. Goodwrench and that is what is done on the hard to bleed S-10s! A Gravity BLEED IS WHAT I WAS TOLD TO DO. It does not work all that well and takes a long time! The power bleeder is far superior in achieving a firm pedal! And it did not let any air in the ABS! I was really happy about that. Well worth the money invested for the power bleeder as a brake fluid flush was $165 (? I am almost certain ?) if done by Mr.GoodWrench! Plus cost of fluid and incidental overhead no doubt... OTD probably $190+. WOW! They should wear masks!

I will take one more. In milder climates the original batteries can last from about three to seven years. You can see how things go and wait with the only drawback being the occasional dead battery as a tell tale. Or just bite the bullet and get a good one with higher capacity than OE and greater CCA for the small wimpy size that fits in the holder. I caution that most do not know the difference and state CA as the Cold Cranking Amps and vice versa. But usually it is CA instead of and in place of CCA. The former (CCA) being considerably lower.

This is all covered in other threads on the CRVOC

Edit: 16Aug09 3PM
Aside from the battery is the alternator and voltage regulator. IMO there is no point in doing anything with that as long as it starts fine and thus charging adequately. And if you are not burning out bulbs frequently which indicates that the voltage regulator might be set too high! It is a crude indicator but it should be reliable and is free as well as the battery electrolyte dropping too fast. Normally once or at most twice a year is OK to add distilled water. More often might indicate the voltage is set too high and you are 'cooking' the battery. If it is a sealed battery such as some of the Delco's then there is nothing to do about adding water.

You can check for corrosion of the battery terminals. Baking soda removes any acid that is corroding the terminals (caution do not get it inside, only neutralised when covered) and and Vaseline can be used to prevent any further corrosion. There are other products that work better such as NoCo but Vaseline works just fine. Any grease actually.

BTW the regulator voltage is not adjustable as it is set electrically and other than replacing the alternator nothing can be done. These days not even the regulators are replaced in alternators in most shops. A relatively easy job if you can take one apart.

In this case the old adage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!" applies to the alternator. Servicing is it is just a masked hold up as there is not much to do but check the voltage and output current. Some shops do it for free! Don't worry. it will let you know when something is wrong by weaker than normal cranking or dimmed lights. A tech is not necessary if you observe!

Later

-Rg
 

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Brake fluid change

Radar,

You need to make one of those nice Black Pearl type documentations on doing this service since you bought one of those gizmo's. I have been struggling to decide if I should attempt this as I have never done it before on any vehicles and sometimes think it should be left to those better equipped. :D:D
 

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Too late! Forgot all the details. You know how us old fogies get...

Sorry! :D:D:D

I do not know if I will be getting to it on my other S-10 which has a hosed ABS (and has the ABS disabled for the moment, back to 70's technology).

But what you really need beeing more relavent is experience on the CR-V. I would be willing to be a Guinea pig Unless I start to read horror stories bleeding the brakes! But it is not due for another two years...

-Rg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the great replies guys! So I think my plan is to keep doing oil/rear diff/ and filters myself. When my battery dies, I'll call AAA and get a jump to the store and get a new one :)

I'll grab some grease and do the obvious stuff like door hinges.

And at 60k I'll either do or have done:

The transmission fluid
The brake fluid

Anything else I'm missing in my plan to take over the world?
 

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I just got the same "offer" yesterday on my wife's V. 2007 with 30K and they wanted to squeeze $500 for the service. what a rip off.
 

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The sense of security by having it done is what sells it to those not familiar with the minimum maintenance required on a very reliable machine. Usually women afraid of having a break down but men fall for it too.

Just checking the essentials IMO is good enough at 30k. As indicated by the owners manual. Requiring the most effort, the brakes are often checked for free in some shops. As well as the rear diff fluid level.

A dealer that is looking for work will do a lot of free stuff as part of the oil change. Around here in any event.

-Rg
 

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Thanks for the great replies guys! So I think my plan is to keep doing oil/rear diff/ and filters myself. When my battery dies, I'll call AAA and get a jump to the store and get a new one :)

I'll grab some grease and do the obvious stuff like door hinges.

And at 60k I'll either do or have done:

The transmission fluid
The brake fluid

Anything else I'm missing in my plan to take over the world?
I'm no wiz kid mechanic but you should include a visual on all belts and hoses.........and change when needed....... failure on the major belt can screw things up big time.
 

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Excellent point! A good examination of the belts is essential since the engine can overheat if the one driving the water pump breaks. Or if power steering belt breaks it may become very difficult to steer for the less powerful drivers.

In reality the life of belts not exposed to oil is very long these days. Easily 60k miles but it does vary. It should be checked just in case for reliability every 30k miles at a minimum.

-Rg
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm honestly not much of a mechanic, is there something I should be looking for on the belts, do I just open the hood and look around? I'm hoping that when they did my oil change which included a "World Class point inspection" they would just take a peak at the belts.
 

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Your 2008 CRV has but one belt: The serpentine belt which is located on the passenger side of the engine compartment.

With plenty of light, and good visibility, you should look at the belt and look for ANY fraying, cracking of rubber (fissures/cracks in the belt) especially at points in the belt where it is curving/bending around a pulley etc. Also look for any missing pieces of rubber, a chunk gone etc.

Post a picture of any abnormality on this forum AND if in any doubt replace, or have replaced, the belt in question.
 

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Just another feedback entry on the Motive Power Bleeder brake bleeder.
I have one and I love it. I used it on my Ford truck with rear ABS (I'm considering a CR-V which is why I got on this forum...).

In the factory service manual, there's a long procedure to bleed the brake system without a power bleeder which involves using some special tool to actuate the ABS pump while servicing -- a huge PITA and expensive.

But, the procedure when using the power bleeder is exactly the same as the instructions that come with the bleeder. The whole job took 40 minutes including I rebleeding the rears just for grins.

Just be careful not to pump it up too much or you can hurt some ABS controllers. You'd be tempted to since it would allow you more bleeding between visits back to the bleeder to pump it up again. But, it's recommended not to go over 15 psi for most cars.

The customer service at motiveproducts.com is some of the best I've ever received. No, I don't work for them I promise. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Your 2008 CRV has but one belt: The serpentine belt which is located on the passenger side of the engine compartment.

With plenty of light, and good visibility, you should look at the belt and look for ANY fraying, cracking of rubber (fissures/cracks in the belt) especially at points in the belt where it is curving/bending around a pulley etc. Also look for any missing pieces of rubber, a chunk gone etc.

Post a picture of any abnormality on this forum AND if in any doubt replace, or have replaced, the belt in question.
Wow, I guess I learn something new everyday! I just took my flashlight and checked it out. For some reason I keep thinking my car is this crazy complicated thing and I need to pay somebody to tell me what to do. Thanks guys! Here is a couple of pictures of what it looks like, looks fine to me!

http://www.sniperd.com/files/belt1.jpg

http://www.sniperd.com/files/belt2.jpg

I love this forum!
 

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[]

I love this forum![/QUOTE] It is great isn't it? It's probably saved me untold dollars in maintenance costs. Although I wouldn't tackle some of the jobs, the filter/fluid changes alone will save a great deal. And with some of the great tutorials posted, you can't beat it!
 
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