Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of December's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having some cupping issues on the rear tires, so I thought I would kill two birds with one stone here. I wanted to get fresh rubber in the rear suspension, and also wanted to provide some adjustability to help with alignment (and accommodate a possible lift kit in the future). I bought the Moog control arm through Rock Auto. It is not listed under the 2009 CR-V, but you can search for the part number "RK100046" and hop right to the part, which was readily available:

136077


(I got the part number from the Moog site--it is just an indexing issue with Rock Auto.)

Here is the standard control arm.

136075


And here is the adjustable type:

136074


The difference here is that the center of the control arm is a turnbuckle. Both ends have opposing threads--one is a right-hand thread, and the other a left-hand thread, so they will tighten in opposite directions. When you turn the center hex portion, you are either lengthening or shortening the control arm. The jam nuts tighten against the turnbuckle to keep it from moving.

Even on a 10-year-old CR-V in the rust belt, I had no issues getting the bolts out. Well, almost. It is a simple job--it is only a matter of removing two bolts and operating a jack. Once I got familiar with the process on one side, replacing the second control arm only took me a half hour at most.

For tools, I used a 17mm low profile socket and ratchet handle, a 17mm box-end ratchet, hammer and long drift punch, floor jacks and jack stands and a wood block, long screwdriver, and either box-end or adjustable Crescent wrench to fit the turnbuckle and jam nuts (it will vary by manufacturer).
  1. Get the rear of your CR-V on jack stands and remove the rear wheels.
  2. Using a floor or low-profile bottle jack, and a piece of wood, position everything so you can support the suspension from underneath, right next to the brake disc. (The way the suspension pivots upward, lifting it at this outboard location will make your job a lot easier.)
  3. Unclip the ABS speed sensor wire from the control arm, if equipped. Tuck it out of the way.
  4. Loosen the inboard bolt first. It is a very tight fit--you will need a ratchet with a low-profile 17mm socket to break it loose, and a ratcheting 17mm box-end wrench to loosen it all the way out of the threads. (You may be able to break it loose with the box-end wrench--they are not torqued down all that tight.) The bolt will not yet come out since there is pressure from the suspension on it.
  5. Loosen the outboard bolt--plenty of room to work here.
  6. Put pressure underneath the suspension--this will release the tension on the bolts so you can remove them without having to pull or hammer them out with a punch. Remove the inner bolt first, then the outer. You may still need a hammer and punch to lightly tap the bolts out, or a long screwdriver to maneuver the bolts around with.
  7. If you are installing the adjustable control arm, follow these added steps. If not, skip ahead to step 13.
  8. Loosen the jam nuts. Remove the clevis end of the control arm, install the ABS speed sensor wire bracket on top of the jam nut with the angled portion protruding towards the center of the control arm, and reinsert the clevis end into the turnbuckle.
  9. You want to turn the clevis and bushing ends of the control arm until an equal amount of thread appears on both ends of the control arm. I exposed maybe 3/4 inch on both ends.
  10. From this point you will want to rotate only the turnbuckle so you can adjust the length.
  11. Important tip--you want to match the length of your old control arm to the new one. Flip the old and new control arms end-for-end, and insert the bolt through the bushing ends into the clevis ends so you line up the holes, therefore matching the length. (To be exact, you can eyeball the holes to make certain they are perfectly aligned.) You should still get an alignment, but at least you will be very close to original on your camber adjustment.
  12. Once your length is set, tighten the jam nuts, making certain the ABS wire bracket is aligned properly and that the clevis and bushing ends are square to each other.
  13. Reinstall the control arm. Slide the inboard bushing into the chassis and insert this bolt first. Snug it up, but do not tighten.
  14. To install the outboard bolt, here is where the jack comes in handy. Either raise or lower it to line up the hole in the clevis of the control arm to match its mounting hole on the rear knuckle. Again, snug up the bolt, but do not tighten.
  15. Clip the ABS wire back into the bracket, and that's pretty much it for the hard part!
  16. Repeat all of this for the other side.
  17. To tighten the bolts, you need to have your CR-V's rear suspension supporting the weight of the vehicle so that you are not straining your control arm bushings. Since I have two floor jacks, I supported the rear suspension with the floor jacks and tightened the suspension that way. The alternate is to put your tires on, lower the vehicle, then tighten the bolts from underneath...which I feel is so much more difficult with the wheel and tire in the way. I think I tightened these to about 40-ish ft/lbs. They don't need to be cranked down really tight--they aren't going anywhere.
  18. Reinstall the rear wheels, and get 'er back on the ground.
  19. Get a new alignment if you feel you need one.
And that's about it. I considered a video and/or photos, but was running on limited time during our rare streak of nice weather here.

If you are installing a lift kit (and found this thread through a search), you will also need to replace one of the strut pinch bolts up front with a "cam bolt" that allows adjustability.

136076


That is something I would let the alignment shop install--not that it's difficult, but it can throw your alignment off. Might as well let them do it.
 

·
Premium Member
2005 and 2006 EX AWD
Joined
·
522 Posts
good job WIldcat good write up,I did my 05 and 06 the 05 I had to heat the inner bolts with oxygen acetylene,I had the whole shop smoked up ,the bolts were frozen to the metal bushing inside of the rubber, about the same miles just history and location and garage parked probably ,it seems to me the UK assembled have rear negative camber problems more often,I could be wrong though,about the alignment, tell the alignment tech. to put the camber on the outside edge of specs. so when you add weight it will bring it in and not out of spec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Not sure why Honda calls for negative camber in the rear of my 2013 CRV but it does show up as tire ware. Like you I purchased adjustable upper control arms. I have the pleasure of doing suspension work on an alignment rack. So I set the camber straight up and down. Give the rear a touch of toe in and the ol Honda comes down the road really nice.

Richard
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not sure why Honda calls for negative camber in the rear of my 2013 CRV but it does show up as tire ware. Like you I purchased adjustable upper control arms. I have the pleasure of doing suspension work on an alignment rack. So I set the camber straight up and down. Give the rear a touch of toe in and the ol Honda comes down the road really nice.
What I found interesting in looking for suspension parts is that the third and fourth generation CR-Vs use some of the same parts. I figured that out through looking at lift kits--I was surprised to see my lift kit was listed for CR-Vs from 2007 to 2016. And I believe they are the same control arms as well, since HRG Engineering (one lift kit manufacturer) sells the same kit that fits both generations, meaning the strut mounts are exactly the same, and the camber correction parts (the camber bolts for the front struts, and upper control arms for the rear) are the same as well.

I'm still concerned about the tire cupping in the rear. I wanted to replace the control arms for that reason (and the old ones actually looked as though they were in good condition--no dry-rotting or loose feeling), but I would have to replace the rear knuckles in order to freshen up all of the other rear bushings. I don't know if toe setting contributes to cupping or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
How has the adjustable control arm held up? One of the local mechanics here mentioned that the rubber in these aftermarket components is not quite up to par.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How has the adjustable control arm held up? One of the local mechanics here mentioned that the rubber in these aftermarket components is not quite up to par.
Seems OK, but it's only been a year, and not many miles put on. Since I went with the Moog parts I expect the quality to be better than some of the other aftermarket brands.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top