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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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567 Posts
Discussion Starter #61 (Edited)
Installed a new right rear brake caliper pin boot tonight. In the process, I realized I put the rear caliper pins in wrong on Sunday. For the rear brakes, pin "b" is the one with flat spots on it. It is the lower pin. I had it in the top spot on both sides. Since the back end was in the air already, that was an easy fix.

To make matters more confusing, on the front brakes, pin "b" is the top pin, and is round! So I need to check the front brakes as well, someday, but I suspect those are wrong too.

I guess the constant here is the pins with flat spots are on the bottom.

I don't remember which way they were when I took them out initially.

I was able to pull the right rear disk off with the aid of two m8-1.25 x 30 bolts in the threaded holes. Tighten one 90 degrees, then the other 90 degress, and repeat until the disk breaks free. (Now you know the purpose of those holes) There wasn't much rust, but it was more than my fingers could overcome.

And I just now noticed my rear brake disk hat is missing the access hole cover screw. Probably missing it on the other side too. Furthermore, looking more at the service manual, I see that I'm missing one washer that goes between the caliper and the hub, or whatever it is the caliper mounts to. I'm missing it on the other side too. :(

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #64
Thanks!

I got home from work today at the usual time (~7:30pm) and decided to check the front brake pins. Why? It's cool outside, somewhat sunny and I have all the tools & greases at hand.

Yes, the front 4 pins were in the wrong spots. Not any more.

Good grief, what dingaling worked on the brakes last? I'm not going there anymore .... oh. ;)

This should be the last time I need to lift the car for a while, unless I decide to figure out that clunking noise in the right front wheel area.
 

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Super Moderator
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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You got all that done quickly. I envy that, as I can never quite do it. No, I have to spend days wire brushing, grinding and cleaning, and eventually make myself stop or never get done. Aargh! Luckily, my Kalifornia/Texas V doesn't have all that under it. What does annoy me, though, is that, after sitting for a couple of days, my rotors become lightly coated with surface rust, and then when I back out of the driveway and go to take off, there's brake grinding noise while the pads clean the stuff off. I hate that.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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567 Posts
Discussion Starter #67
One thing I noticed when taking the pictures - the rear wheels have a mud flap, but the front wheels don't. Was that normal?
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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8,775 Posts
One thing I noticed when taking the pictures - the rear wheels have a mud flap, but the front wheels don't. Was that normal?
Same configuration as Gen2s.

The rear flaps help locate/steady the bumper cover in the rear. Front mud flaps were available from dealers when the cars were new.
 

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Super Moderator
'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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A nice day, a clean car and a Nikon:

(The color is "Urban Titanium Metallic")
View attachment 139704 View attachment 139705 View attachment 139706 View attachment 139707
That is a mighty fine looking ride ya got there! I like those wheels, so I found a set and bought them. My V came with custom 18's, with 255/55/R18 tires on them, which look good, but are heavy, stiff, and noisy, and affect fuel mileage. When tire time gets here I'll put those OEM wheels back on and some nice, quiet Michelins.


One thing I noticed when taking the pictures - the rear wheels have a mud flap, but the front wheels don't. Was that normal?
My Nikon makes my V look good, too! Well it doesn't hurt. Those are called Splash Guards. My '07 has them all around. They work, and look good, too. They are discontinued but you might still find them on some online Honda parts sites. Here's what mine looks like, with the splash guards and the 18's:

2007 CR-V 008.jpg
 

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Premium Member
2008 EX AWD
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172 Posts
In the fall of 2017 I bought a 2008 CR-V EX with ~155,000 miles. I traded in a 2004 Nissan Maxima (V6, ~23 MPG) in favor of AWD and hoping to get better MPG with this 4 banger. Like you, I’m only getting ~22 MPG on my daily drive (70/30 hwy/city). Yes, I do drive 80 MPH on the highway but I did that with my Maxima as well. Not to mention the engine seems extremely underpowered for this vehicle. When this one kicks the bucket I’ll be going back to something with a V6.


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2018 EX-L fwd
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In the fall of 2017 I bought a 2008 CR-V EX with ~155,000 miles. I traded in a 2004 Nissan Maxima (V6, ~23 MPG) in favor of AWD and hoping to get better MPG with this 4 banger. Like you, I’m only getting ~22 MPG on my daily drive (70/30 hwy/city). Yes, I do drive 80 MPH on the highway but I did that with my Maxima as well. Not to mention the engine seems extremely underpowered for this vehicle. When this one kicks the bucket I’ll be going back to something with a V6.


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Owned an '08 CRV for 10 years / 208K. Easiest way to explain the difference between your 2 vehicles: when driving on the freeway, open a window. Extend your arm out the window. Hold your hand in the "STOP" position. That is your CRV. Now hold your hand pointing forward with all fingers together. That is your Maxima.

Now have '18 CRV. Better aerodynamics, better mileage than '08 CRV & '10 Accord EX/2.4L. Not quite in the range of the hybrid, though.
 

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This should be the last time I need to lift the car for a while, unless I decide to figure out that clunking noise in the right front wheel area.
In our case, the front clunking and rattling was the front struts. I find those to be an easy job to replace, especially since I bought new units already preloaded into new springs and hardware (KYB Ready Struts are better than the Monroe QuickStruts...I've had both).

The stabilizer bar link could be clunking also--I had a noise for months, yet the link felt OK when I had the CR-V in the air. Turns out that was just putting pressure on the link and preventing it from clunking. I saw a very fine split in the rubber boot though, and I finally realized the link was bad.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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567 Posts
Discussion Starter #73
From a video I shot last summer:

Youse :) have to stop for road construction. I have to stop for road construction and cattle on the road.

The ranchers were simply moving the herd from one field to the other. Normally there's no need to stop; I did only because the driver in front did. Driving through the herd at idle speed is fine.

If the cows are coming at you, they'll move out of the way and you're free of them pretty quickly. If they're going the same direction, then it takes longer to get through because they can't see you.

Sometimes the ranchers have dogs helping out. When I had my Border Collie, a scene like this would drive him nuts. He wanted to be out chasing the cows.

 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #74
Last night I decided to go after the clunking noise coming from the right front wheel. I ordered a new stabilizer link and two nuts from the dealer, then spent the next who knows how many hours removing the old one.

There was simply too much rust for PB Blaster to have much effect. I sprayed it on, but even if I had done so every few hours over the next few days, it wouldn't have worked.

Since there are no flat spots on the stud base for a wrench, I tried grabbing the stud's base with vise-grips. They kept slipping off every time.

So out comes the sawzall.

Well, my 11" blade is too long when attached to the saw's flush-cut adapter, so I went to the basement for a shorter one. There weren't any, so I had to buy some 6" blades at Home Depot. (the flush-cut adapter lets me put the blade as close as possible to the body.)

I started to hack away at the top, then thinking I wasn't getting too far, tried a different approach. Drill out the stud in the link with successively larger bits. On the top one, this is easily done thanks to the presence of the hex socket. When I was close enough to having the entire stud drilled out (width-wise; abouth half-way through depth-wise) I put a 17mm socket on the nut and twisted. It broke right off. The top one was now free.

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On to the bottom. Drilling out the stud was not an option here. Lacking a 17mm six-sided box wrench, and with absolutely no room for any kind of socket, I cut the bottom one out with the saw. But, it still left the threaded stud & nut completely attached to the stabilizer bar.

139763


Now with the link completely gone, I had some room to work. Since the lower nut is on the engine-side of the bar here, I had no room for the sawzall. At least I was able to get my 17mm wrench on it and get the stud to spin.

I have a hand-held 4" grinder in the work van with both cutoff and grinding wheels, would that work? And so I went at it, with a cutoff wheel first, cutting slots in it (like a # (pound sign)) that I could later punch off with a hammer & chisel, or pinch them off with the vise-grips. Hammering against it was somewhat of a problem. After all, this is now free from the top, so it is free to wobble when whacked. Then I realized if I beat the hammer towards the back of the car, no such wobbling would occur. (The bar can only go up and down, not back and forth.)

After a while it was time for the grinding wheel. I ground it flat so that I could get the vise grips on the nut and pull the stud through.

I got a little too close on two passes with the cutoff wheel:

139764


After all of this work, the new link was installed and the clunking noise is gone!
 

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I have to do the rear links on both of our '09s. I still have a cutoff wheel, but lately it's been easier to use a carbide tip Sawzall blade to cut them off. When I did my front struts two summers ago, I lucked out in that I was able to clean up the exposed threads, dab on some anti-seize, and the nuts came right off. But on the other CR-V, everything was too rusty.

Now I'm fighting the front suspension on a TSX. I managed to crack the nut most of the way off on one of the links using an impact, but it got caught at the very end. I am being careful since I think these were replace in the past couple of years but, knowing how these things go, I have a cart ready at Rock Auto to replace both fronts.

To show you where I'm hung up on the TSX, I'll borrow a small part of your photo since the TSX is somewhat similar:

139765


There is a metal bushing through the middle of the rubber in the control arm. The metal bushing is rusted to the bolt, so I can't remove it. If I turn the bolt too hard, it will break the weld nut off. (I already did that on a different bolt on the other side.) On top of it, I had to break the front left wheel speed sensor since it was rusted into the steering knuckle (which I need to remove). The right front speed sensor was already bad, and I figure I'll have to break that one out also (I already have a replacement for it).

The TSX is 15 years old, and while the underbody has very little rust, parts of the front suspension do have a bit more rust than I expected. I have to pull the steering rack. I'm only 2/3 of the way there right now on the rack...
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #76 (Edited)
The day after I replaced the stabilizer link, I took the car in to the dealer to have the alignment checked. There's a shimmy in the steering wheel. It's only noticeable at speeds over 65 mph, and it doesn't happen all the time.

They said the alignment checked out, but the left front spring was broken and the tires may be out of balance. The quote to replace both struts with aftermarket parts was $980, with Honda parts, $1,400 (no, those prices are not a misprint. I don't know if they include an alignment.) I said no thanks and paid the bill.

My thinking was there is no broken spring. I haven't seen it, haven't had any clunking, crunching, or any other noise from any of the wheels after replacing the stabilizer link. I thought they wanted to take me for a ride, financially.

Today I went to a tire shop I've used for years to get them balanced. I asked if I could look at the front left spring, telling him what the dealer told me. He looked and said yes, it's broken, at the bottom and proceeded to show me.

Soooo, here's my first un-expected maintenance item.

The spring is replaceable by itself, and I do have spring compressors. Of course both sides would be done.

Or do I just replace both struts? I don't want or need 'performance' or 'sport' struts, just those that are good enough and will last a few years.

Regardless, I would also need to replacee the stabilizer link on the left side, the one I didn't replace. Due to all the rust, I'd have to destroy it to remove it.

Either way, I would have to rent an electric impact wrench (or spend $180 or so for a cordless Makita that will work with the other Makita 18v lithium battery tools I have). And I still need to find six-point box wrenches.
 

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2008 EX AWD
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I replaced the front struts (and rear shocks) on mine a year or so ago. It wasn’t too bad of a job but I do have pneumatic tools. I personally wouldn’t bother replacing just the spring, especially if those are the factory ones. I’ve got a coupon code for Advance Auto Parts, if you have one of those in your area.




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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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I got my Milwaukee corded electric impact at a pawn shop for a c-note. Works great when I don't want to fire up the compressor. I use it mostly for rebuilding Quincy air compressors, which I do on the side, but it works great for automotive use too. Try eBay for the 6-point wrench sets and sockets. Old Craftsman or Williams. Much cheaper and better than anything new. I went through my tools several years ago and did the eBay thing and now have multiple sets of everything I could possibly ever need. I also always look when at pawn shops. A little haggling will go a long way.

I would go ahead and replace the strut/spring assemblies all at once and be done with it, so I didn't have to do the same job twice. Unless the shocks were fairly new. Get everything done, then get an alignment and go.
 

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I also vote for replacing the front struts/springs/hardware as a complete unit, since it will already be apart. Even if you replaced the spring, you'd have to replace them on both sides, as the spring rates probably would be different with new vs. old, or Honda vs. aftermarket. But having said that, if you're not getting any out-of-control bouncing or leaks from the front struts, maybe a spring replacement is all you need, given the low mileage.

I went with the KYBs on the front of mine, since the Monroes I had briefly had terribly noisy mounting hardware:

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That's from Rock Auto.

The strut process for the front is quite easy. I can do both sides in under an hour, using hand tools. (I didn't have my Milwaukee impacts yet, so it's probably even less time now.) Essentially, there are five nuts on top, two large "pinch" bolts and nuts on the bottom, the stabilizer bar link nut, one nut for a sensor wire bracket or brake line (I'm doing this from memory), and that's about it. If you've already replaced your stabilizer bar links, you're in luck--it will save you fighting to get those off or having to replace them. The hardest part will be holding up the strut to attach a couple of nuts when you reinstall it.

Broken springs aren't uncommon. My '88 Accord had a broken front spring, in the middle of it. My '97 CR-V lost a small chunk of the bottom of one of the springs in my driveway.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #80
Tool Acquisition Mode was engaged last night. I went to one of the local pawn shops, where I found 1000 12-point wrenches of all kinds and exactly 0 six-pointers, of any size. But, I did see a giant DeWalt 1/2" impact wrench for $99. I picked it up and wandered about the store a little, then found exactly the same impact for $89. I set the $99 one on the table and picked up the other one. I asked if they'd take $80 and he said yes. It's a DeWalt DW292 which sells for about $150 new. At 8 pounds it's huge, and has 345 ft-lbs of forward torque. It should do the job. It can apparently run on DC power too.

Today I had to bite the bullet and order the 19, 17 and 10mm six-point wrenches from Amazon. I got the 19 and17 for suspension work. Since I'm already ordering from them, I'll get the 10 for the bleeder screws. I had to pay extra to get them here by Friday.

Due to the rust, I may have to order the 4 giant strut nuts & bolts and the stabilizer link plus it's two nuts from the dealer, just so I can finish the job once I start it. (Only one stabilizer link was replaced earlier.) I'm sure they'll take returns but I need to find out. Fastenal charges about the same as the dealer for that hardware. Flange nuts & bolts that large (M16x62) are too big for hardware stores here.
 
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