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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #81
A few days ago I took the old front brake disks to the recyclers. 34 pounds of steel got me 34 cents. Why did I even bother?

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Last night I made the backlights on the steering wheel buttons brighter. In the process of doing that I had to disconnect the battery, and noticed the brand-new (April 2020) battery already had some corrosion on the positive post. It's a Champion-brand 51r battery that Dad got when the car wouldn't start one day and had to be towed in. (In retrospect, I should have told him to wait until I arrived home and I'd deal with it in the garage, saving them the tow and shop bills.) While I could not wiggle the connectors, they were not very tight. Honda sure knows how to make cheesy battery cable clamps (the steel bands).

Heck, while I'm here let's remove the j-hooks and hold-down bar and clean them with baking soda.

I also noted that the plastic box around the battery was installed in a position I thought was backwards (open side facing the engine). That oversight could not be allowed to continue so it was fixed before the battery was reconnected. I have no idea what purpose that box serves, but Honda put it there so it must serve some purpose, otherwise they wouldn't bother. (It may be to keep heat out, but exactly how much heat does a black plastic box repel?)
 

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2018 EX-L fwd
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Sounds like this is quite the challenge for you. It seems, though, that you're more than capable of surmounting them. Speaking from experience, the only sure thing about making any kind of repairs is that Murphy tried to do the same thing before you.

Will add my own $0.02 to your discussion, if it's not too late!

In 2015, I replaced all 4 OEM shocks with KYB's. Your new ride experience will tell you that they are worth the added expense. Here is my write-up: 2008 Brake/Suspension work

At that time, KYB did not have complete strut assemblies. If I had to do it all over again, I would still get KYB's, but I would get the completed assemblies.

I had a 1/2 inch impact wrench & all the hooks / bolts to compress the springs. All the while I was compressing each spring, a voice in the back of my mind kept repeating, "What if something slips / breaks?" In addition, if you don't mark your rear struts before dismantling them, you may reassemble them incorrectly, which I did with the first one. So, instead of doing 4 compressions, I ended up doing 5.

I now know of, and use, a DIY shop for OCs. It has a wall-mounted spring compressor. Still not sure that in the future I'd use that instead of buying a complete assembly.

Best of luck as you continue!
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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A few days ago I took the old front brake disks to the recyclers. 34 pounds of steel got me 34 cents. Why did I even bother?

---

Last night I made the backlights on the steering wheel buttons brighter. In the process of doing that I had to disconnect the battery, and noticed the brand-new (April 2020) battery already had some corrosion on the positive post. It's a Champion-brand 51r battery that Dad got when the car wouldn't start one day and had to be towed in. (In retrospect, I should have told him to wait until I arrived home and I'd deal with it in the garage, saving them the tow and shop bills.) While I could not wiggle the connectors, they were not very tight. Honda sure knows how to make cheesy battery cable clamps (the steel bands).

Heck, while I'm here let's remove the j-hooks and hold-down bar and clean them with baking soda.

I also noted that the plastic box around the battery was installed in a position I thought was backwards (open side facing the engine). That oversight could not be allowed to continue so it was fixed before the battery was reconnected. I have no idea what purpose that box serves, but Honda put it there so it must serve some purpose, otherwise they wouldn't bother. (It may be to keep heat out, but exactly how much heat does a black plastic box repel?)
Thanks hugely for the pdf on the steering wheel button lights - just added that to my list!

On the battery posts, I now know that battery posts are no longer made to standard size. The positive post on my new 24F AGM battery is smaller than the one on the 51R was, so I had to get some of those lead post sleeves, as the positive clamp, all the way tight, was not tight enough. I hate that!

On the battery box, it's there as heat protection for the battery, considering how close it is to the engine in a very tightly packed engine compartment. So you did good. You might even consider adding one of those insulating pad sleeves they have for batteries now. Might not be as important in Montana, but it is here in Texas!
 

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Today I had to bite the bullet and order the 19, 17 and 10mm six-point wrenches from Amazon.
I bought a Milwaukee M18 1/2" impact last year and while starting work on the cars this years, realized that I didn't have a set of metric 1/2" impact sockets. The set of deep well 6-point sockets I got was highly reviewed and I think it was only $42, if that.

BTW, the stabilizer link will come with new nuts. I did not have to replace the two big bolts and nuts for the front struts. What I do, though, is clean up the exposed threads with a wire brush and then apply anti-seize (or even a dab of grease or oil) to the threads so they can be removed easier.
Fastenal charges about the same as the dealer for that hardware.
That's good to know, as I'm heading to the Acura dealer in about 30 minutes to order bolts and nuts for the TSX. The two bolts are a specific length, but I also wanted high-quality nuts to match. I had to search a couple of Hondas to find nuts that would fit the bolts, but I have a list now with Honda part numbers and can have my parts guy order them. The adjacent Honda dealer is the same owner, and their computer systems are all tied together, so I can actually order parts from either place.
At that time, KYB did not have complete strut assemblies. If I had to do it all over again, I would still get KYB's, but I would get the completed assemblies.
The complete KYB assemblies are a very recent product for the third gen CR-Vs. I tried buying these in 2018 but they were not yet available. (In fact, when I looked, all the sources were out of stock except for one of the front units.) I went with the Monroes. The struts are fine, but the hardware is junk--both of our fronts were rattling again. I replaced my front hardware with Moog but ended up replacing the fronts with complete KYB units. The other '09 still has the noisy Monroes--since I have the spares with the Moog hardware, I'm going to do a swap once I get the TSX done.

I think the KYBs have a slightly more compliant ride than the others--they are really nice over the road. Not that the Monroes had a bad ride, but they are slightly stiffer and more like the Honda struts I replaced.

Yeah, I would usually go for replacing struts in a 10 year old vehicle, but given the low mileage on the OP's CR-V, that might not be necessary yet. (I don't know if age affects the internals of a strut as much as usage does. Ours probably had 120k or more on them when I replaced them.)
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #85
Well, the strut removal project began tonight. I'm doing only the front struts; I'll do the rear struts when that time comes.

There are three bolts on each 'lower' strut, the part below the sheetmetal & behind the wheel. The two giant bolts (M16-2.0 x 62) and the top one on the stabilizer link.

I started by slathering some Naval Jelly on them, then did it again.

Then I put my new 19mm six-sided wrench on the big nut. It didn't fit! Wut?

Turns out the bolt head is 19mm, but the nut is 22mm. Since it's 8:30 at night, I might have a chance of finding an open parts place. One was open, and I bought a 22mm impact socket.

Back at the garage, I was about to hit the big nuts with the impact, but I decided to try the breaker bar first.

They moved!

The bottom two nuts came off, on both sides, without the impact, but with a fair amount of muscle.

Not surprisingly, the top nut on the right stabilizer bar came off. I installed it only a week ago.

The top nut on the left stabilizer bar moved about 1/4", but it needs to go about 3/4". I'll leave that for tomorrow. (The sawzall is still on standby; I have a new stabilizer bar and nuts for just this scenario.)

But I couldn't believe I got the bottom 4 bolts off without the impact.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #86
And my CR-V is carrying its own weight again.

The left front stabilizer link had to be removed via sawzall and grinder. I tried the impact on it, the thing would spin the entire shaft since the vise-grips would spin off, every time. What a design flaw, not including two flat spots on the thing to put a wrench on so this would not happen.

It took forever to get the first strut in. 45 minutes or so. I looked in each hole, one was a bit smaller so I drilled it out the same diameter as the other 4, but still it wasn't going. (Two pieces of sheet metal on top of each other and the two holes didn't quite line up.)

Then, for what must have been the fifth time looking at things, I noticed the arrangement of the studs and inserted it that way. <smacks forehead>

The new struts came with 15mm nuts, the old ones were 14 mm. So I put the new (nylock) nuts on, and proceeded to fling one somewhere in the engine bay. Hopefully I can find one at the hardware stores tomorrow. I could re-use the old nuts, but there is something inherently wrong with using four 15mm nuts and one 14 mm on the same assembly. It is only slightly less irritating if one side has all five 15 mm nuts and the other side has five 14 mm nuts.

A short drive around the block confirms no new noises, scrapes, clunks or indicator lights, so it will sit on the road until it gets an alignment on Monday.

It be busticated, for sure. This was the front left, and the break is on the engine-side of the strut. Judging by the color of the rust, it has been broken for some time.
20200704_202233.jpg
 

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2008 EX AWD
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I love this thread! I love reading about people wrenching on their vehicles themselves, like I do. Too many people these days don’t know how to do the first thing on their vehicle. There are things I can’t/won’t attempt (transmission/engine swap, timing chain - major things) but I try to do most things myself. One reason, to save money, but also because I enjoy it. I do brakes, rotors, shocks, spark plugs, starter, oil change, stereo etc. If I’ve never done it before I can usually find a YouTube video to use as a guide!


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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Wow! I've never seen that happen! I normally associate spring steel with the best metal used in a car. Guess I'll have to lower my expectations. Again. Actually, this is somewhat disconcerting, as this kind of failure could be catastrophic at the wrong time.
 

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I reused my 14mm nuts on top of the struts with no issues. And surprisingly they are only torqued to 33 ft/lb. The hardest part in my case was holding onto the whole strut assembly with one hand while I tried to fish it through the holes, enough to get one nut partly on to hold it in place. I forget what the two larger bolts/nuts are torqued to, but it was quite a bit more.

Those stabilizer links are probably the bane of every Honda owner's existence though. 😁 I lucked out in that with my kiddo's TSX, the links were only a few years old and came off with the impact. I did squeeze the flange from behind to get the nut the rest of the way off. But that flange behind the link should always have been a hex--that allen wrench in the end of the link has never worked for me.

The Sawzall with the carbide blade I had to use on two of the four lower control arm bolts that had frozen inside the control arm bushings. Very tedious, and I had to modify the blade, but it worked. I was also prepared to do this to the stabilizer links but didn't need to, fortunately. I have steering knuckle rust issues to deal with this week though...it won't be much fun.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #90
The car got an alignment today, only the front wheels. Afterwards, I took it out for a ride on the interstate. There is still some shimmy in the steering wheel, but it's not all the time and not as bad as before. The tires were re-balanced last week.

I'm thinking the tires may need time to get used to their new, proper, positioning. Who knows how long that spring was broken.

Or, maybe I should have replaced the anti-rattle clips on the front brake calipers and done more to them, the calipers that needed a hammer to remove the pads.

Anyhow, I think I'm done with maintenance on this car for a while. In the 34 days since it's been in my garage, I've spent about $745 and perhaps 50 hours on it. Most of it was for stuff that won't need to be re-done for a long time (or ever), but still....
 

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2008 EX AWD
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The car got an alignment today, only the front wheels. Afterwards, I took it out for a ride on the interstate. There is still some shimmy in the steering wheel, but it's not all the time and not as bad as before. The tires were re-balanced last week.

I'm thinking the tires may need time to get used to their new, proper, positioning. Who knows how long that spring was broken.

Or, maybe I should have replaced the anti-rattle clips on the front brake calipers and done more to them, the calipers that needed a hammer to remove the pads.

Anyhow, I think I'm done with maintenance on this car for a while. In the 34 days since it's been in my garage, I've spent about $745 and perhaps 50 hours on it. Most of it was for stuff that won't need to be re-done for a long time (or ever), but still....
How did you even find a place that would only align the front wheels and why wouldn’t you want to have the rears done?
I just got an alignment (all 4 wheels) done today on my ‘12 Odyssey. $115.xx and I can bring it back as many times as I want to for the next year.


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(The title of this thread is based on Norman Maclean’s novel “A River Runs Through It”, which is set in western Montana in the 1920’s.)

Last year, my dad realized he could no longer drive (he’s 83), so he asked if I wanted his 2010 EX-L. I thought about it for a few months then decided to take it. I was driving a 2007 Honda Accord SE with the same 4-cylinder engine; it had about 190,000 miles on it at the time. It was in great shape (still is), and I had no payments on it except for the insurance. And, I liked it, so there was no real reason to find another car.

But it was Dad’s, and I got the impression he wanted me to be driving it, not someone else he didn’t know. So, in late 2019 I said I’d take it.

I was supposed to fly back to the Buffalo NY area (where I grew up & where mom and dad still live) and drive the car back on April 5th. Yeah, that didn’t happen. I could have gone even though both MT & NY were under shelter-in-place orders at the time, and really wanted to, but when I saw in the last few days of March that Rhode Island was stopping all cars with NY plates and forcing them into self-quarantine for two weeks, I decided to hold off. Of course, I don’t drive through RI but what if Pennsylvania, Ohio or Illinois got that idea? At the time, I had started the process to get a Montana title and registration but didn’t have them in hand yet.

Then I bought a ticket to fly back in early May, and the airline cancelled the flight!

During this time I got the car registered in MT and got plates for it, then later on got insurance for it.

I waited until one week before my new planned date to buy a ticket, this time on a different airline. Friday 5/29 came and went with me ending up in Buffalo, finally! Today I put my Montana plates on the car, and all was well with the world.

I’ll be starting the two-day drive from western New York to Montana on Monday. Yes, two days. About 1,100 miles/15 hours per day. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are all behind the wheel. Stay tuned...

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Good luck with the trip I have a 2010 EX-L I have 135k on it now that crv with only 26k should last you for years
The only thing I had to do to mine Besides oil,brakes,tires is The ac compressor The clutch wasn’t engaging I heard that’s a issue on the crv s
Have a safe trip
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #93 (Edited)
After a not-very-good few days at work....

There is a sound coming from the right front wheel that sounds much like the word "bung". It's 100% related to the new struts I put in, since in the days before that job there was no noise from anywhere.

This noise didn't start today, it's been going on since the minute the struts were installed. The various other noises the car made in the few days after that have gone away, they were probably the struts getting used to carrying the weight.

It only happens when launching from a dead stop (forward or backward), and occasionally after a "California" stop. It never happens at any other time, not when taking corners too fast, going over railroad crossings, hitting potholes or speed bumps.

Of course to remove the strut and do anything to it means having another alignment done after it's installed. I've already spent $200 in alignments, I don't want to spend a dime more on them.

The shimmy in the steering wheel is still present, but it's not as bad as before the strut job. It only shows up over 65 mph, and even then it doesn't always show up.

The $#^&@~! TPMS light is on again, for the 2nd or 3rd time in 7 weeks. I am so glad my '07 Accord does not have that system. Now I think I know why Dad wrote 35 psi over the 30 in the manual - the silly light has probably been coming on for a long time. This time I made a note of which tire I added air to. The other 3 were at 37, which makes me wonder if my gauge is accurate, or if the tire shop just fills them up to whatever and calls it good.

The oil consumption is looking like it will be about 1 quart every 1,500 miles. It's about 1/4" above the bottom dot now; I'll mark the miles when it finally does reach it.

Actually, I don't want to spend another dime on the car. Today is one of those days I wish I had never taken it out of Buffalo.
 

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The front struts pretty much bolt in with no adjustments, so I wouldn't worry about alignments. I didn't on mine when I swapped in front struts, and the alignment is still OK. (With the rears struts, though, moving that one lower control arm mount does change the alignment, so I'd have a 4-wheel alignment done if I messed with that again.)

I suspect it's the Monroe QuickStruts--I had two sets and they were both noisy. That's why I dumped those and went with KYBs in the front of my daily driver. The other '09 has only gotten noisier, but I do have some spare new strut hardware for those and will pull them when I get a chance. Funny, our noisy '09 makes a similar "bung" sound but only when the steering wheel is turned--it is probably the way the spring is seated in the strut mounting hardware. I think Monroe's actual strut cartridges are OK, but the hardware they provide with it seems to be substandard.

Which TPMS light is on? If it's the light that actually says "TPMS" then one or more of your sensors probably has a weak battery. They last about ten years, and your CR-V is right at that age. I had all new sensors installed on my daily '09 when I had the tires changed last year, but the other has one sensor with a weak battery. If it's the low inflation light, it is programmed in the ECU to alert you to when the tire pressure is a certain percentage lower than what is recommended for the vehicle. (I forget if it's 20% or 25% below the recommended 30 psi--the low pressure light should illuminate at 22-24 psi, in other words.) Note, too, that if a sensor has a low battery, it will not read the pressure correctly; therefore, a weak sensor battery can illuminate either light. The ECU only uses the data sent to it from the sensor.

Here is how the system works:


Oil consumption for most manufacturers is not considered excessive until it exceeds one quart per 1,000 miles.

Can't blame you for being disgusted with it. But on the bright side, it has such low mileage that you could probably get a good price for it if you sold it.
 

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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #95
I think Monroe's actual strut cartridges are OK, but the hardware they provide with it seems to be substandard.
That's what I'm thinking.
If it's the low inflation light,
It is. I checked one tire with the pressure gauge I normally use (a dial-type) and with a stick-type that I use in the van. Both showed within 2 PSI of each other so I'd say my dial gauge is just fine. I like the dial types because they're easier to read.

The front left tire was low on air. It appears it has a very slow leak.
Oil consumption for most manufacturers is not considered excessive until it exceeds one quart per 1,000 miles.
I know, but any gearhead knows that's nonsense. Actually, I think one quart over an entire oil change interval (about 8,000 miles on my Accord) isn't really acceptable either.
 

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I know, but any gearhead knows that's nonsense. Actually, I think one quart over an entire oil change interval (about 8,000 miles on my Accord) isn't really acceptable either.
I'm OK with a quart or even two on every oil change (the B-series in the first-gen CR-V always consumed a little oil, and it had a 7,500 mile oil change schedule) but to me, yes, 1,000 miles is excessive.
It is. I checked one tire with the pressure gauge I normally use (a dial-type) and with a stick-type that I use in the van. Both showed within 2 PSI of each other so I'd say my dial gauge is just fine. I like the dial types because they're easier to read.

The front left tire was low on air. It appears it has a very slow leak.
I had a digital pressure gauge I used for a decade but the tip finally got brittle and broke off. I bought two new ones, and one of the new ones clamps onto the valve stem and hooks to the air compressor--it makes the fill-up job much easier, especially since it has a small valve that you can release air with. (I'm often adjusting bicycle tires, and have five cars to maintain pressure in, so it was worth buying.)

Were those tires on the CR-V ever replaced? I would think so after 10 years.
 

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2008 EX AWD
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I fully understand not wanting to spend any more money on it! But I think after a few more dollars, getting everything lined out, it will be good to go for a long while. But, of course, some things will need to be replaced as you go just because of age.


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I fully understand not wanting to spend any more money on it! But I think after a few more dollars, getting everything lined out, it will be good to go for a long while.
The third gen does have some common issues but, with such low mileage, @ms3224a is having to deal with issues right now that have to do with rust, age and with the CR-V possibly having sat for a while undriven. And once everything is sorted, it should probably go 80-100,000 more miles before other major issues start coming up (starter, AC compressor clutch coil, evap solenoid, etc.). I would think the end of the repairs should be in sight by now. It's worth enough right now to put money into. 👍👍
 
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The third gen does have some common issues but, with such low mileage, @ms3224a is having to deal with issues right now that have to do with rust, age and with the CR-V possibly having sat for a while undriven. And once everything is sorted, it should probably go 80-100,000 more miles before other major issues start coming up (starter, AC compressor clutch coil, evap solenoid, etc.). I would think the end of the repairs should be in sight by now. It's worth enough right now to put money into.
Agreed.


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2010 EX-L (AWD, non-Nav)
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Discussion Starter #100
The tires are about 5 years old. Maybe someday I'll take the one in and see if they can find a leak. That won't be very expensive.

Yes, the list of maintenance items is (mostly) cleared out now. But the fact that I still have a shimmy in the steering wheel after balancing the tires, replacing the struts and doing an alignment bugs me. I don't expect a perfect car, but I do expect one to not have a steering wheel that shakes after spending about $500 doing those jobs that should have corrected it. And, with this oil consumption it's almost a two-cycle engine.

Somewhat surprisingly, the rust doesn't bother me much anymore. As long as I can break the nut/bolt free, removing it will not be as bad the next time. Cars that spend their entire life here get little more than surface rust, even 30 year old cars. It's no surprise to me that Montana has the oldest cars still on the road (average age 16 years). The weather, and our vehicle registration setup, ensure that. My 2019 Transit company van cost about $350 to register for this year. Next year it will be slightly less, decreasing a bit each year. When the vehicle is 11 years old, you can do one of two things: A) keep paying the yearly fee, or B) pay one final time and never visit the motor vehicle office again (permanent registration). My '07 Accord's registration expires 12/31/9999.
 
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