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I was changing out the rear brake pads on a 2005 2.4l honda CR-V. Driver rear went fine then it became a pita at the pass rear. On the pass rear rotor I found that both inside and outside facings were nearly completely covered with surface rust. when removing the caliper I tried to compress the piston with a c-clamp, it wouldnt budge. Took it off and put it on my bench vice and only then after putting effort into it was I able to compress the piston. So at this point I considered the caliper seized and bought a new caliper and flex line. After installing these I noticed that there was an abysmal amount of brake fluid leaking out of the the hard-line and I thought there should be alot more. I pressed the brakes and couldn't get any fluid out. I then put a mighty vac (hand vacuum pump) on the hard line and it held 25" of steady vacuum, again no fluid. Then I disconnected that hard line from ABS modulator and now it doesn't hold any vacuum so I know the line is clear. Pump brakes again and no fluid comes out of that port on the ABS, it's bone dry. Would you say this is an internal failure of the modulator pump? all other calipers move freely, no abs or brake lights.
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Welcome to the forum! I would closely examine the line to make sure it is intact, with no kinks, bends, mashed spots, rust-through or other leaks. Actually, I'd examine all the lines for a car this old. Not sure if this model has a proportioning valve, but if so I'd want to check that as well. Altogether, including the ABS system, there are a lot of lines. Not sure if I remember correctly, but I I do that right rear line is the first in bleed order, so there's that. Even though a line may seem clear, it could be corroded inside, as could any fittings. Really dark dirty fluid is not a good sign. If there is a recommended power bleed procedure I'd do that, as it should give away problems too. I once had a Jeep Cherokee from New Hampshire that was so bad I had to replace every line on the car and the entire brake system. Fun! So I did a rear wheel disc conversion, which also required a new/different proportioning valve. Had it in the garage, but it was the dead of winter and at the time I had no heat in there yet, and I 'bout froze! But, when I was done, the brakes were outstanding! That Jeep also had the 4.0L six and a 5-speed manual, as well as real 4X4 and it was a 2-door. Loved that thing. If I ever replace this CR-V I will probably look for another one of those. But I digress. These Honda systems are different and I haven't worked on one. But there are folks here who have, and they will be along shortly to help, I expect.

To make a short story long, I highly recommend a Honda factory service manual. I got mine on disc in pdf form off ebay for cheap. Over 3,200 pages of detailed goodness, goes into great detail on brakes as well as all systems. Please keep us posted on how this goes.
 

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Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
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12,154 Posts
Since the ABS pump does a test-pump the first time you surpass 10 MPH on any drive, I'd try it again. Perhaps a couple panic-stops with one side on pavement and one side on gravel will 'exercise' the pump enough to get it working.

A shop (or dealer) that could actuate the ABS pump might be worth a visit.

The pump IS suspect if the brake fluid wasn't replaced in the past. Though I haven't heard of issues.
 

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I was changing out the rear brake pads on a 2005 2.4l honda CR-V. Driver rear went fine then it became a pita at the pass rear. On the pass rear rotor I found that both inside and outside facings were nearly completely covered with surface rust. when removing the caliper I tried to compress the piston with a c-clamp, it wouldnt budge. Took it off and put it on my bench vice and only then after putting effort into it was I able to compress the piston. So at this point I considered the caliper seized and bought a new caliper and flex line. After installing these I noticed that there was an abysmal amount of brake fluid leaking out of the the hard-line and I thought there should be alot more. I pressed the brakes and couldn't get any fluid out. I then put a mighty vac (hand vacuum pump) on the hard line and it held 25" of steady vacuum, again no fluid. Then I disconnected that hard line from ABS modulator and now it doesn't hold any vacuum so I know the line is clear. Pump brakes again and no fluid comes out of that port on the ABS, it's bone dry. Would you say this is an internal failure of the modulator pump? all other calipers move freely, no abs or brake lights.

Text Font Line Parallel Screenshot
 

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Welcome to the forum! I would closely examine the line to make sure it is intact, with no kinks, bends, mashed spots, rust-through or other leaks. Actually, I'd examine all the lines for a car this old. Not sure if this model has a proportioning valve, but if so I'd want to check that as well. Altogether, including the ABS system, there are a lot of lines. Not sure if I remember correctly, but I I do that right rear line is the first in bleed order, so there's that. Even though a line may seem clear, it could be corroded inside, as could any fittings. Really dark dirty fluid is not a good sign. If there is a recommended power bleed procedure I'd do that, as it should give away problems too. I once had a Jeep Cherokee from New Hampshire that was so bad I had to replace every line on the car and the entire brake system. Fun! So I did a rear wheel disc conversion, which also required a new/different proportioning valve. Had it in the garage, but it was the dead of winter and at the time I had no heat in there yet, and I 'bout froze! But, when I was done, the brakes were outstanding! That Jeep also had the 4.0L six and a 5-speed manual, as well as real 4X4 and it was a 2-door. Loved that thing. If I ever replace this CR-V I will probably look for another one of those. But I digress. These Honda systems are different and I haven't worked on one. But there are folks here who have, and they will be along shortly to help, I expect.

To make a short story long, I highly recommend a Honda factory service manual. I got mine on disc in pdf form off ebay for cheap. Over 3,200 pages of detailed goodness, goes into great detail on brakes as well as all systems. Please keep us posted on how this goes.
Online manual shows starting at front left when bleeding.
That is surly different !!
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Mine is an '07 - Gen 3, and shows the exact opposite bleeding order from the olden days standard order, which was LF-RF-LR-RR. Weird! Don't know about the Gen 2's.
 
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