Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just went on a 900 total mile road trip into the mountains of West Texas. To get there it was 80 mph I-10 most of the way. So in the wide open spaces of I-10, Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) and Lane Keep were tested, and then further tested on twisty mountain road ascents and descents along with long stretches of two-lane highways at 70 mph.

ACC with adaptive following works fine on the Interstate, however, Lane Keep would often cause unnecessary hunting back and forth. As a result, Lane Keep was usually turned off on the Interstate. Lane Keep needs better adaptive tuning or perhaps some manual parameters for width and type of road. Perhaps logic to stay right or left or center depending on road type. In my area, most would prefer a right side bias on fast two-lane roads and a center through left side bias on the fast lanes of interstates. Lane Keep tries too hard to stay in a tight center position and often overcorrects and recorrects and overcorrects, eg hunting.

On twisty Mountain two lanes with switchbacks and plenty of distractions outside, Lane Keep works great, even with hunting, because of the dangers and scenery on those kinds of roads. However, ACC was next to worthless here and poor on longer two lane roads with gradual elevation changes because it could not adapt to curves and had to be constantly re-enabled everytime manual brakes were applied. Taking your eyes off the road to adjust the ACC speed and to verify mode was not good either.

Occasionally both ACC and Lane Keep were used when Lane Keep did not want to hunt so much. One other thing, Lane Keep beeps are useful but are too similar to every other beep in the car and as a result are not as effective as they could be if they were more unique. Hunting does not help either in the beep department.

Overall I was glad I had ACC and Lane Keep. Just hope the engineers in Japan keep updating the logic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,770 Posts
Lane Keep is supposed to be an assist function, simply nudging your hands in the right direction; it's not intended to take over lane-keeping duties.

And it makes sense that ACC isn't going to work on curvy roads; when there's no traffic in front of you, it's no different than traditional cruise control at all, and you'd never use cruise on such a road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
With all the publicity on self-driving cars, and tesla's autopilot function, too many people seem to confuse these safety features like lane-keep, adaptive cruise control, etc with self-driving functionality. They are not the same. Please don't use it as such. Even Tesla says their autopilot function is not meant for you to take attention off the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
515 Posts
I prefer ACC and Lane Keep on long, straightish roads where the traffic and speeds are generally consistent but in traffic, windy, twisty roads I much prefer my senses...it is also much more fun that way.
Nice report though...thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
“On twisty Mountain two lanes with switchbacks and plenty of distractions outside, Lane Keep works great, even with hunting, because of the dangers and scenery on those kinds of roads.” Certainly did not say my hands were off the wheel. Obviously good as a safety feature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
For me, LKAS is better on ideal roadways. I don't feel as comfortable using LKAS on tight winding roads as the electronic steering feels very limited by how fast and how much force is available to steer. And that's not even mentioning the current LKAS iteration that frequently loses roadside path sanity when the roadway widens, narrows, undulates, passes an intersection, or when roadside markings change.

Honda's ACC is much better in open road driving. Traffic disruptions highlight the ACC's delayed response time and myopic traffic awareness. For me the worst is when the lead vehicle is slowing but far enough away that the ACC commands an acceleration to close the gap as you see cars ahead all slowing. But the ACC doesn't know any better. It seems to put excessive weight on the the lead vehicle gap and needlessly continues to overshoot on acceleration and then apply an excessively hard brake. It isn't anything an alert driver would do. It isn't good for comfort, safety, fuel economy, brakes, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You have to use ACC as a convenience to keep your foot from cramping in one position. Certainly the driver can and must observe and react. So I set the follow to 4 seconds / bars and it follows speedwise very nicely. If I see a slowdown based on brakelights (usually) I tap my brakes and smoothly slow or change lanes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,770 Posts
Honda's ACC is much better in open road driving. Traffic disruptions highlight the ACC's delayed response time and myopic traffic awareness. For me the worst is when the lead vehicle is slowing but far enough away that the ACC commands an acceleration to close the gap as you see cars ahead all slowing. But the ACC doesn't know any better. It seems to put excessive weight on the the lead vehicle gap and needlessly continues to overshoot on acceleration and then apply an excessively hard brake. It isn't anything an alert driver would do. It isn't good for comfort, safety, fuel economy, brakes, etc.
It's kind of funny; ACC is at it's most valuable in heavy, but steady, traffic, because you don't have to spend your attention maintaining a steady following distance. It frees you up to do precisely what you do best (vs. a short-range monocular camera and a distance-finding radar) which is to look for and evaluate longer-distance hazards (like abruptly stopped or slowed-down traffic, the need to stop for a traffic light, looking for a tractor-trailer likely to shift lanes, etc.)

Essentially, everything your driver's ed instructor told you about "defensive driving" on the highway, you can now do better. Yep, some of those things involve taking over for the cruise, but that's no different than what you'd have to do without ACC. ACC hasn't made a mistake, it just can't know everything you know, because it's not expensive enough to be that smart. You know that that large gap in front of you is about to be filled by 40 Tons of Mack Truck with its turn signal on; ACC just sees a gap, and traditional cruise wouldn't see anything at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,181 Posts
It's kind of funny; ACC is at it's most valuable in heavy, but steady, traffic, because you don't have to spend your attention maintaining a steady following distance. It frees you up to do precisely what you do best (vs. a short-range monocular camera and a distance-finding radar) which is to look for and evaluate longer-distance hazards (like abruptly stopped or slowed-down traffic, the need to stop for a traffic light, looking for a tractor-trailer likely to shift lanes, etc.)

Essentially, everything your driver's ed instructor told you about "defensive driving" on the highway, you can now do better. Yep, some of those things involve taking over for the cruise, but that's no different than what you'd have to do without ACC. ACC hasn't made a mistake, it just can't know everything you know, because it's not expensive enough to be that smart. You know that that large gap in front of you is about to be filled by 40 Tons of Mack Truck with its turn signal on; ACC just sees a gap, and traditional cruise wouldn't see anything at all.
Exactly.....I love these features but know full well they are assists helping me out. They are not "smart" in the sense of knowing what is going to happen next, its up to the human driver to do that. I have heard complaints by some about the "flaws" in these systems but I think those people are missing the point of what these systems are really for. They do not drive the car for you rather they are assistants who are trying to help where they can. After a year of driving with these systems over many types of roads and situations I love them. I know their limits and strengths and use them accordingly. They do not, and were not intended to, drive the car for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
Lane keep uses a camera, so it relies on a contrast between the white or yellow lines and the pavement. In some cases, such as wet pavemment, low sun angle at dusk/dawn or faded pavement markings, it cna get a little confused. it can confuse a seam for a marking, or ground off markings for the real ones. It's not perfect, it's just a camera without the intellgence of a hman mind to consider everything else around it. Of course we get confused as well sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Did your Cr-V have TSB 17-064 installed? Thanks

I think the ACC is slightly better, but not my much,since I had it installed.

Your experience pretty much match mine. I typically use LKAS in the Colorado mountains twisty roads only or the Interstates at night, when tired. Otherwise, I preferred a right-side hugging lane position esp on straight way one-lane mountings roads.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top