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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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Check the battery to see if the cold cranking amps are 410 amps. If it is and if you replace it get one that has 500 CCA. I heard that solves many of Honda's battery problems. OE batteries don't usually have a long life going for them and you could of just gotten a defective one.
CCA has nothing to do with battery charge levels and discharges. Even 410 is overkill for starting CRV engines.. even in very cold weather. Yes... bigger CCA often follows more reserve charge capacity.. but not always and it is not linear in nature either.

What an owner needs is a battery with much larger reserve charge capacity specification. Reserve capacity is rated in [email protected] persistent drain. From there you can actually calculate the reserve charge at full capacity and you can also calculate how many days your CRV can sit idle and still be expected to start on demand.

So... yeah.. you can get a bigger battery.. but even a group 24 is only about 30% more reserve charge capacity over a 51R. So.. it is no silver bullet. Whereas simply monitoring and maintaining your battery, including periodic saturation charge on a smart charger over night will get you farther than a larger battery in terms of battery life expectancy.

Note: my 2017 CRV Touring still has it's original battery and I have properly maintained it since I took delivery. It is 3.5 years old now and in my monthly check last week.. the battery (a 51R factory OEM, rated for 410 CCA) tested at 470 CCA actual and tests at 100% plate integrity (which means it will still be running at or near near maximum reserve charge capacity).
 

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My 2018 Honda CRV Touring sits for days and sometime a week or more and I don't have any issues but the battery may have been replaced as I bought it used and the CCA is 500. Someone else posted that information too about the higher CCA solving all his problems. He could have a defective battery as they do sometimes just go bad. I had an OE battery in a 1995 Camry that when it was failing had water on the top of it. Even after replacing it the battery sat on my garage floor and still bubbled water/acid on the top of it. I still have the acid stain on my floor to prove it.
 

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CCA has nothing to do with battery charge levels and discharges. Even 410 is overkill for starting CRV engines.. even in very cold weather. Yes... bigger CCA often follows more reserve charge capacity.. but not always and it is not linear in nature either.

What an owner needs is a battery with much larger reserve charge capacity specification. Reserve capacity is rated in [email protected] persistent drain. From there you can actually calculate the reserve charge at full capacity and you can also calculate how many days your CRV can sit idle and still be expected to start on demand.

So... yeah.. you can get a bigger battery.. but even a group 24 is only about 30% more reserve charge capacity over a 51R. So.. it is no silver bullet. Whereas simply monitoring and maintaining your battery, including periodic saturation charge on a smart charger over night will get you farther than a larger battery in terms of battery life expectancy.

Note: my 2017 CRV Touring still has it's original battery and I have properly maintained it since I took delivery. It is 3.5 years old now and in my monthly check last week.. the battery (a 51R factory OEM, rated for 410 CCA) tested at 470 CCA actual and tests at 100% plate integrity (which means it will still be running at or near near maximum reserve charge capacity).
What kind of maintenance and monitoring do you do? Also what kind of smart charger do you use?
 

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2013 CRV EX
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Even if this was a 2020, if a person sat there long enough with electrical power being used without the engine running, you could end up with a dead battery.

Lesson - dont use the radio etc when the engine is off.
And you shouldn't leave a bunch of accessories (including USB) plugged in and left as they will continue to draw down the battery- that was my mistake and it cost me a new battery. If I'm not driving the car for a few days, I connect it to a NOCO 1.1 amp smart charger which removes sulfates from the lead plates and restores the battery health to a new-like condition. I check it periodically with a voltage meter. Remember Honda has a dual voltage system.
 

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2019 CR-V EX
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My 2012 Sierra has a bigger battery in it. 650 CCA. Listening to the radio on accessories will last about 10- 15 minutes and then it will give a low battery alarm. This is a fully charged battery. Well known issue on the truck forum.
Reliability is of more concern to me than a wear item like a battery.
 

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2019 CR-V EX
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Had the exact same thing happen, I even tested the battery the previous week and it was over the rated cca! But a few minutes on accessory mode and that was it.

I think the stock battery is just too puny for anything but starting the car, Honda didn't really design this car to run on accessory mode for more than a few minutes.

I would strongly recommend looking into a larger battery, like many of us did:

With the 24f I can even run the fan for 30+ minutes and the battery voltages barely moves!
 

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2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
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What kind of maintenance and monitoring do you do? Also what kind of smart charger do you use?
Monthly, I use my battery charger to run a full test on the battery. This test will check the CCA capability of the battery, as well as plate impedance. Generally, batteries most often fail to start a vehicle as their first symptom.. and that would go to depleted plates (seen with rising impedance measurements) and a corresponding loss of CCA. Note: a new battery will exceed it's CCA spec when tested... generally by about 20%. The one thing I do use CCA for is to determine when to replace a battery. When I see CCA begin to start a persistent decline in my monthly tests.. I replace the battery.

Twice monthly, I perform an overnight saturation charge with a smart charger. There are a number of good brands, but I personally prefer NOCO and am using NOCO-5s on my vehicles currently. The positive outcome from twice monthly saturation charges is that the charger can and does actually perform some modest reconditioning through the charging steps in the smart charge. I think of it as good hygiene for a starter battery.. as it will help reverse any recent sulfation before it becomes permanently compromising to the plates. [Currently, since we only use our vehicles about once a week.. I keep them on the NOCO 7/24 when in the garage].

Once every six months, I gently pop the rectangle caps off the top of the battery and shine a light down into each cell so I can see fluid levels. If I find any cell below the normal fluid level, I top them up with a little distilled water. This insures that I never lose a battery due to electrolyte depletion.

I also generally drive with my headlights on as well.. since most of my trips are short in town drives. Having the headlights on forces the Honda dual-charging system to remain in the high-charge state. Hondas love to move down to the low charge state as quickly as possible, to save a bit of fuel economy. The side effect of the low charge state though is it tends to bleed some charge off the battery, and if the charging system did not kick back up to high charge state right before you parked.... then your battery is probably not fully charged when you park it. Note: I have a Touring trim, so my headlights are LEDs.. and will never go bad and need replacement in the lifetime of the vehicle.
 

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My question is;
Is it normal for the battery to discharge enough that the car won't crank after 10 minutes with the ignition in the accessory mode and radio turned on? The air/blower was turned off. The dealer service person says that the battery will be dead after 5 to 10 minutes in the accessory mode. Is comparing a lithium-ion battery to a car battery(lead-acid?) actually a legitimate comparison since they're so different?
It seems to be normal. I have a 2018 crv ex and 100% of the time I use accessory more, even if it’s less than 5 mins, the battery will die. I get it jumped and tested and it tests good. Obviously I don’t use accessory mode anymore and I have no battery issues, but it took a couple times of it happening to realize that’s what the issue was. So in my experience it’s normal.
 

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The Enforcer
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It seems to be normal. I have a 2018 crv ex and 100% of the time I use accessory more, even if it’s less than 5 mins, the battery will die. I get it jumped and tested and it tests good. Obviously I don’t use accessory mode anymore and I have no battery issues, but it took a couple times of it happening to realize that’s what the issue was. So in my experience it’s normal.
Indeed, and with most people these days nose-deep in their mobile phones, Accessory Mode use should, in theory, not happen.
 

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2021 CRV EX-L
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Normal? depends ...

There are a WHOLE LOT of discussions here about CR-V batteries, especially the GEN 5 CR-Vs.

It seems that the consensus is that the current original batteries will last about 3 years...IF they have been used normally. During COVID many folks are not driving enough to fully charge the batteries, which in turn is bad for the battery life. Have you checked that water levels in the cells?

Do a search here and read some of the battery threads.

I would guess that your battery is about to fail
I would say this is the best response. A healthy battery should not stop after 10 minutes of playing the radio in accessory mode. More than likely the battery was on it's last legs.
 

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I would say this is the best response. A healthy battery should not stop after 10 minutes of playing the radio in accessory mode. More than likely the battery was on it's last legs.
I agree.

Most owners seem to be oblivious about their starter batteries in their vehicle until the vehicle fails to start. Then they complain when their battery goes suddenly dead on them after 2-3 years of no testing, no routine maintenance checks, and never topping up wet battery cells. That said.. the best "rookie test" of a vehicles starter battery is to put the vehicle in ACC mode.. as that can and will flag a weak battery early and with malice when the vehicle suddenly needs a jump start.

And then we have a circle of owners who remember back when their early 2000s vehicle did not have this issue. Well... an early 2000s vehicle also did not have dozens of different electronic subsystems either (all of which need to kept in a known power down state when you stop your vehicle.. otherwise.. the vehicle needs 30-60 seconds to fully reboot and self-test all the systems every time you start your vehicle).

For current generation CRVs... as soon as you open the drivers side door and climb in.. the vehicle wakes up and draws what appears to be 5+ amps even before starting the vehicle. If you turn it off, and then put it in ACC mode.. it will still draw a lot of power, but how much depends on what is turned on while in ACC mode. The Head Unit may draw an amp or two, but it is actually the power amp that will suck the life out of a battery, depending on what the volume is set to. Same with any fan blowers running as these do suck a lot of power. And then there are cabin lights, and other odds and ends.

I have never bothered to do a full power profile of a gen5 CRV in all modes of the start button or key, mainly because I NEVER leave my vehicles in ACC mode, and haven't for many years. So the following is an informed estimate, not solid numbers from Honda, and in reality it is best to focus on the state of health of the battery rather than what power demands the vehicle might have in ACC mode.

A) Pre-2020, stock batteries in gen5 CRVs were a 410 CCA 51R battery. Generally, these have a stored charge capacity of 30 amp hours when brand new and at 100% state of charge. Upsizing to a premium 51R or a larger battery group (like 24, or 47) will raise this to ~ 40-45 amp hours. You can roughly calculate the stored charge in amp-hours in a starter battery by reading it's reserve charge spec (which is generally specified as minutes of power @ 20 amps drain). Beginning in 2020... CRVS with a 1.5T engine got an upsized battery, a group 47, and specified for use with auto start/stop vehicles.

B) The challenge though is vehicle batteries are often not at full charge when you park them and turn them off. It could be due to a short trip, or it could be due to the vehicle having sat unstarted for week or more unstarted. In the case of Honda and some other brands... they use intelligent charging systems that seek to downgrade battery charging somewhat as a minor fuel economy measure.. and so that factor alone means that many CRVS (and other Hondas) get parked and powered down with less than 100% charge. 80-90% of full charge at parking is NOT unusual for Hondas.

C) from the day you install a new battery, it begins a long slow decline in health.. leading to eventual failure. A persistently under charged battery will decline in health at an accelerated rate. A battery of wet flooded cell design also are NOT maintenance free and as such.. you do need to check and periodically top up the cell electrolyte levels or your battery will simply go dry and fail.

With all of the above taken into consideration... it is unwise to run modern vehicles in ACC mode sitting parked and with the engine powered down. You are just asking for trouble by doing so, and most likely are also essentially shortening the life expectancy of your battery. You can upsize your battery, as well as insure it is kept fully charged when parked at home by using a smart charger/maintainer.. and in doing so.... you can actually overcome the weakness ACC puts on modern vehicles batteries to a good degree.

To give owners some perspective here.... a brand new fully charged and properly functioning starter battery in a properly functioning CRV should last ~ 1 hour in ACC mode.. but even then.. you are literally slowly destroying your battery.... because flooded cell starter batteries want to be at or near full charge all the time... for longest life. Low charge state kills batteries prematurely.
 

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My wife's 2018 CR-V EXL wouldn't crank after sitting for 10 min with the switch on accessory mode. She was listening to the radio, but there were probably other things on also. I called the dealer and was told that the batteries in these cars would drain after 5 to 10 min on accessory mode.
The car is 2 years old and has 21000 miles. I just wondered if this is considered normal.
Just from the data you presented here.. I can tell you that the battery in your wifes CRV is weak, and near death. Which also means it is risky to simply recharge it and expect it to be back to "good as new". Each discharge of a vehicle starter battery to the point where the vehicle cannot be started = 10-20% of normal life expectancy removed from the battery simply from the discharge damage to the internal plates.

It sounds like the batteries state of charge was sitting at 10-20%. If you had put a volt meter across the battery before turning on ACC... I suspect the battery voltage was sitting at around 12 vdc.. which is very low... it should read 12.7 at full charge at 70 degrees ambient temperature.

Replace it.. because it is a failure waiting to happen. Then take good care of your battery, and you can easily get 5 years from it... but you have to monitor and maintain your battery.
 

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It seems to be normal. I have a 2018 crv ex and 100% of the time I use accessory more, even if it’s less than 5 mins, the battery will die. I get it jumped and tested and it tests good. Obviously I don’t use accessory mode anymore and I have no battery issues, but it took a couple times of it happening to realize that’s what the issue was. So in my experience it’s normal.
Shouldn’t die after 5 minutes
 
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