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2020 CRV EX-L Platinum White Pearl/Ivory
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Problem here is corn has better uses as feed and yet we can't find enough feed for livestock now. This is one reason ethanol is un-sustainable as none of those plants can self-sustain themselves and us Tax payers are still footing their bills. Were still wasting precious Fossil fuel to make alternative fuel. This to me is a Go Figure????
Ethanol has become a political football, was originally conceived to reduce the amount of imported oil, should have gone away when we reached energy independence, so unnecessary now, it's a money cow for those producing it, and only they benefit from it. The drain on the corn supply has raised food prices for everyone. When you figure the total energy costs, it's a looser. Add politics and it's a disaster.
 
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Problem here is corn has better uses as feed and yet we can't find enough feed for livestock now. This is one reason ethanol is un-sustainable as none of those plants can self-sustain themselves and us Tax payers are still footing their bills. Were still wasting precious Fossil fuel to make alternative fuel. This to me is a Go Figure????
What a wonderful idea, let's burn our food.
That way the enemy won't get it?
 

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I live in the "corn belt" and have received calls lately for backing a 15% ethanol mandate. I've been told by Honda service up to 10% for for my older car. What a concept, let's mandate fuel some of us can't use.

The ethanol thing has run it's course, IMHO. It's just that the farmers got so invested in it. It has an effect on land use, water, and food prices. I suppose this is considered "green" energy. But I'll bet the farm equipment is running diesel. It's either corn or soy here. Think it's time to figure out what else to grow.
 

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I live in the "corn belt" and have received calls lately for backing a 15% ethanol mandate. I've been told by Honda service up to 10% for for my older car. What a concept, let's mandate fuel some of us can't use.

The ethanol thing has run it's course, IMHO. It's just that the farmers got so invested in it. It has an effect on land use, water, and food prices. I suppose this is considered "green" energy. But I'll bet the farm equipment is running diesel. It's either corn or soy here. Think it's time to figure out what else to grow.
Ask Colorado.
 
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I have a 2005 CRV and will be doing a lot of highway driving this summer. I normally use regular but should I use premium gas now and then?
The idea of using premium gas now and then is an old wives tale. In reality, premium gas is intended to be used in engines that have a high compression ratio. Why? Because if you use low octaine gas in a high compression engine it tends to cause knocking. This results in lower power for a given amount of fuel and possible damage. Thus, they have high octane gas that burns slower and does not knock in the high compression engines. So, if you use high octane gas in a low compression engine you are not cleaning the engine, you are not doing it a favor or giving it a "treat". You are wasting money and not getting the full power your engine was designed to deliver. Use the octane your manual recommends.
 

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I have a 2005 CRV and will be doing a lot of highway driving this summer. I normally use regular but should I use premium gas now and then?
Why? What do you think it will do?
What does your owners manual say? What does Honda say? Go by that and stick to the recommendation your 2005 CRV is no Maserati or Formula 1!!............
 

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The idea of using premium gas now and then is an old wives tale. In reality, premium gas is intended to be used in engines that have a high compression ratio. Why? Because if you use low octaine gas in a high compression engine it tends to cause knocking. This results in lower power for a given amount of fuel and possible damage. Thus, they have high octane gas that burns slower and does not knock in the high compression engines. So, if you use high octane gas in a low compression engine you are not cleaning the engine, you are not doing it a favor or giving it a "treat". You are wasting money and not getting the full power your engine was designed to deliver. Use the octane your manual recommends.
The 2020 Hybrid manual recommends 87 OR HIGHER
 

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2017 Civic EX Sedan, 2020 CR-V Touring
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Back on topic, the short summary is like this:
  • Octane only matters if your engine ECU is set up for it or is designed to use a more aggressive tune when it detects higher octane (Some very powerful V8 setups do this from the factory)
  • Ethanol has a lower MPG / L/100KM. If the fuel has 10% Ethanol, you are going to get about 3% lower fuel efficiency. If you are going long haul, finding pure gas will get you farther on each tank.
  • All "TopTier" fuels have the same minimum detergents and additives, regardless of the grade (At least in Canada and the US and likely Europe too).
The only reasons to consider 91/93 octane (91 is typically the highest in Canada) are:
  • It means avoiding Ethanol to get all the benefits from pure gas or to stop burning food.
  • Your manual says to use it at all times.
  • Your manual says to use it to get max engine power.
  • You like spending money for no good reason whatsoever!
I had an 89 Accord back in the day and cheaped out once and put 87. Manual said 91 and I heard from the engine over that choice in a hurry! Otherwise, I run premium (91) to avoid Ethanol as where I live, premium is almost always Ethanol free so people can also get it for small engines like mowers and snow blowers.

Why? Because if you use low octaine gas in a high compression engine it tends to cause knocking.
Right but not accurate. Even high compression can be tuned to work with 87. It really is all down to how the engine is tuned. As a HONDA example, the 1.5T in the CRV has more power than the one that is in the GenX hatch but that one in the hatch, to get max power, that again is still lower, you need to use 91 octane.
 

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With your port-injected engine, you would still benefit from the consistent use of Toptier fuel. If you really feel pro-active, a bottle of Tecron before each oil change. With Toptier, paying extra for 93 is a waste as all grades of Toptier brands have the upgraded additive/detergent package.
What's the thing with Techron? Is this similar to Chevron's F-310 from back in the 60's 70's?
 

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There have been several recent published testes comparing the use of premium in cars designed for regular. Their results mostly align with @PhilF . More money spent with little if at all benefit.
What a load of bollocks, mate!

"There have been several recent published testes comparing the....."

I sincerely hope it was not your testes that were published here.......ouch!:LOL::ROFLMAO::eek::oops:
 

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What a load of bollocks, mate!

"There have been several recent published testes comparing the....."

I sincerely hope it was not your testes that were published here.......ouch!:LOL::ROFLMAO::eek::oops:
Heh..the typo strikes again! :oops:
 

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Regular in Cheyenne is 85...UGH!
Yeah, they claim it's because of the high altitude, but that shouldn't matter to a turbocharged engine.
I pay the extra for 87, even though I'm pretty sure the naturally aspirated engine in my hybrid would be OK with 85.
But hey, we can buy ethanol-free 93.
BTW - if you hover your pointer over the flag it will show you the poster's location, assuming they have entered that info in their profile.
 

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Honda recommends higher octane -- especially with DI engines (87 or higher). Car and Driver dyno'd 8 more wheel horsepower with premium 93 over regular 87. You 'can' run 87, but you will not make the most of the engine because the PCM has to retard timing. However, in this generation, you might not gain very much... but for the K24Z7 or DI engines, definitely... at least mid-grade.
 

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Honda recommends higher octane -- especially with DI engines. Car and Driver dyno'd 8 more wheel horsepower with premium 93 over regular 87. You 'can' run 87, but you will lose some power because the PCM has to retard timing.
You could say you "lose" power by not using premium, or you could say that you "gain" power if you do.
Half empty or half full.
I seriously doubt I would even notice an extra 8 HP, and I would not be willing to pay extra for it.
Of course it's not really relevant to the naturally aspirated non DI motor in my hybrid.
I'll just continue to use what my manual suggests, including the Top Tier recommendation, even though that is probably less important for a port-injected motor.
 
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You could say you "lose" power by not using premium, or you could say that you "gain" power if you do.
Half empty or half full.
I seriously doubt I would even notice an extra 8 HP, and I would not be willing to pay extra for it.
Of course it's not really relevant to the naturally aspirated non DI motor in my hybrid.
I'll just continue to use what my manual suggests, including the Top Tier recommendation, even though that is probably less important for a port-injected motor.
I don't really know if most cars will "gain" any power by using higher octane fuel than recommended. Most manufacturers have programmed their PCM for maximum efficiency for the fuel they designed it for, that is if it's 87 octane then the spark map, cam timing, etc. won't be geared for anything higher thus no increase by using a higher octane fuel. In fact, if the PCM was programmed for 87 octane and nothing higher, then using 93 octane will actually result in you "losing" power because the ignition timing for one thing won't advance more to take advantage of the higher octane fuel. The higher the octane number, the slower the gasoline burns so all of the fuel won't be consumed before the piston reaches BDC. I have a car that the manual says requires at least 87 octane however best performance is with 92 octane or higher. With 12:1 compression, it is true as I've compared acceleration of 0-60 and 87 octane gave 6 seconds while 92 octane gave 5 seconds. Of course this is all during break-in so it'll get better (with just under 2,000 miles I recently clocked at 4.9 seconds so the engine is definitely getting better as it accumulates mileage). However, most cars that are designed to run on 87 won't result in any power gains by running a higher octane fuel.
 

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With 12:1 compression, it is true as I've compared acceleration of 0-60 and 87 octane gave 6 seconds while 92 octane gave 5 seconds. Of course this is all during break-in so it'll get better (with just under 2,000 miles I recently clocked at 4.9 seconds so the engine is definitely getting better as it accumulates mileage). However, most cars that are designed to run on 87 won't result in any power gains by running a higher octane fuel.
What are you saying? The computer advances timing based on the gasoline? How much advance? What about 103 octane?

I think there is a limit here. The computer doesn't know what octane the gas is, it's only relying on a knock sensor to retard timing.
 

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I think there is a limit here. The computer doesn't know what octane the gas is, it's only relying on a knock sensor to retard timing.
That's probably what is happening with the Honda engines that say 'or higher'. This would be why Car and Driver got an extra 8whp in the dyno test since the engine was not retarding the timing. Honda probably just 'tested' it with 87 fuel and got 190hp based on that retarded timing, but recommended 'or higher' for those who want the maximum power -- even if it is just a few ponnies. All I can tell you is that I can definitely feel the difference going from 87 to 'higher' with the K24Z7 and the K24W engines; however, the difference in fuel economy was negligible.

Conversely, for the generation 2 engines, I would probably stick with regular 87....
 

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So, Ive read almost every word and I own a 2005 V with just over 83000 miles and drive in the HOUSTON TX area aka swampy near sea level thick and humid air. LOL I run the AC ALL DAY EVERY DAY so far. I didn’t see anybody Mention keeping a spare AIR FILTER for the engine in your spares in the garage or on a long trip, throw one in the car, say, under the picnic table. Relying on a walmart off the beaten path to have your filter, not gonna happen. I have about 4 walmarts in my immediate driving area and only 3 have a stock sticker for my part number and only ONE of the 3 had one in stock when I went looking for it.. Now we all know Walmart isn’t the only place to buy a filter, but generally its whats open at the craziest places and times along the route across country. Ive driven to Ohio for the past 2 decades and so far Oklahoma is the hardest state To drive across and have need for car repair and such.

That said, being stranded once in Michigan a long time ago in a Civic hatchback needing a primary fuel filter, taught me to have a few supplies handy in those cross country trips.

I haven’t bought anything more than 87 octane, monitor my consumption and most of my driving to date has been city. I have a few trips longer planned, but not for some time now, I don’t feel or hear any pinging from my engine.

Other notes to make, will you be On the fast highways or the winding route highways??? Here in Texas, speeds are around 75 posted and well, you know noone goes the speed limit here or uses turn signals, on the other highway sizes, the state routes and such, speeds might get UP to 70, but then you have some slowing down between county lines and towns with no bypass. It’s the worst when we go through Oklahoma as hwy 75 is the most direct route to Missouri for us and we have speeds UP TO 70, then down to 35 through town, oh and there’s a town about every 15 miles, so hmmmm.

Enjoy your driving, wherever it is you get to go.

Note to the moderator that said we could hover over the flag to find where the poster might be, How about if we are on an ipad??? I can’t get my finger to hover on the flag.
 
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