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Note to the moderator that said we could hover over the flag to find where the poster might be, How about if we are on an ipad??? I can’t get my finger to hover on the flag.
Sorry, don't have an iPad handy, have you tried tapping the avatar?
I did miss that some folks are on touch interfaces, I'll set one up so I can look at it that way. Thanks for the tip.

For some of those towns in OK, the primary source of revenue is speeding tickets.
 

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I have a 2005 CRV and will be doing a lot of highway driving this summer. I normally use regular but should I use premium gas now and then?
Using Premium gasoline ONLY INCREASES TORQUE. Torque is what gets you going from a standstill. Use premium gasoline when towing a trailer.👌

I have a 2005 CRV and will be doing a lot of highway driving this summer. I normally use regular but should I use premium gas now and then?
 

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Using Premium gasoline ONLY INCREASES TORQUE. Torque is what gets you going from a standstill. Use premium gasoline when towing a trailer.👌
I don't understand what you're saying. Torque and horsepower are mathematically related, and that relationship is literally cast in steel.
If you are saying premium gas only increases torque and not horsepower, I would have to disagree.
 
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Sorry, don't have an iPad handy, have you tried tapping the avatar?
I did miss that some folks are on touch interfaces, I'll set one up so I can look at it that way. Thanks for the tip.

For some of those towns in OK, the primary source of revenue is speeding tickets.
Ain’t that the truth and I seem to know EXACTLY where the sitting spots are all. I don’t tend to speed but i admit they spent a LOT of money on signage to bring you down from 70 to 35 on that route, cause it seems they have signage on both sides of the same lane(split highway) or what have you, its quite amusing. It would seem Oklahoma is also the only state Ive driven in that the semi trucks are nearly ALWAYS in the right hand lane(slow lane) on the open road, they don’t seem to try and pass at speed, they do clog up both lanes when we are going through the towns at those lights and slower speeds, but they all magically get into the right lane on the open sections. That right lane sure takes a beating though.
 

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No. Stick with with what the manufacturer suggests. The engine CPU will compensate the difference in compression and adjust if using premium fuel. But don't use regularly.
Changing the oil regularly or more frequently would be more beneficial than premium gas in my opinion.
Your comment of "difference in compression" is very misleading. The engine compression ratio is always the compression ratio unless the engine has been mechanically altered by a technician (e.g. the technician removed the cylinder head and shaved the head, used different thickness head gaskets, used higher compression pistons etc.) Higher octane results in shorter flame combustion so that engine timing can be adjusted and advanced accordingly.
No matter who the manufacturer is, use the manufacturers octane recommendation unless you are skilled enough to modify ignition timing. Of course, any ignition modification results in voiding your manufacturers warranty.
I agree with Tony Tiger that changing the oil regularly or more frequently would be more beneficial in preserving your investment. Also use a gasoline manufacturer that is a Top Tier gasoline retailer. TOP TIER™ Gasoline Brands. Top Tier fuels have the additives all newer vehicles need to keep them running properly. All major automotive manufacturers support Top Tier gasoline.
 

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Not here. I drive past 3 stations selling it every day.
You can even buy leaded gas, but not for road use, and generally not at a "normal" gas station. It's used for some agricultural machinery.
Wow! That is an amazing revelation! I was ready to pounce on your comment until I researched it and found you were right. Quoted from NBC news, While leaded gasoline was fully phased out in 1996 with the passage of the Clean Air Act, it still fuels a fleet of 170,000 piston-engine airplanes and helicopters. Leaded aviation fuel, or avgas, now makes up “the largest remaining aggregate source of lead emissions to air in the U.S.,” according to the Environmental Protection Agency.
Thanks for the insight!
 

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Your comment of "difference in compression" is very misleading. The engine compression ratio is always the compression ratio unless the engine has been mechanically altered by a technician (e.g. the technician removed the cylinder head and shaved the head, used different thickness head gaskets, used higher compression pistons etc.) Higher octane results in shorter flame combustion so that engine timing can be adjusted and advanced accordingly.
No matter who the manufacturer is, use the manufacturers octane recommendation unless you are skilled enough to modify ignition timing. Of course, any ignition modification results in voiding your manufacturers warranty.
I agree with Tony Tiger that changing the oil regularly or more frequently would be more beneficial in preserving your investment. Also use a gasoline manufacturer that is a Top Tier gasoline retailer. TOP TIER™ Gasoline Brands. Top Tier fuels have the additives all newer vehicles need to keep them running properly. All major automotive manufacturers support Top Tier gasoline.
This is correct.
My bad, I meant timing.

I also wanted to add after reading the discussions. The CRV is not a sports car. Its for tootling around town. If you look at the optimal power band and efficiency of how the engine has been designed to be used. Its in the 1500-3000 rpm range. That is where we all usually sit when doing boring driving stuff. Hondas target audience is budget conscious families and reliability. The engineers have designed the engine for the cheapest gas which is usually the lower octane.
Also these vehicles are used a lot in Asia. People there may not have access to top tier gasoline or they may not do regular oil changes with signing dancing mechanics. My cousin owns a mechanic shop in Punjab India. I can tell you, its not as sophisticated and some of the Honda vehicles that come in are very abused. These engines are designed to take more of a beating than gentle trip to Walmart.
Here in north America we have access to good quality gasoline in the majority cases. Oil is also cheap. Hell.. half the time when I topped up my oil. Other than using the manufacturers spec. I just bought the cheapest oil on sale and dumped it in. My engine runs fine at 409,000km.
Unless one is driving a German vehicle or sports car. I would not be putting premium gas in the Honda (unless stated by the manufacturer) I just find the cheapest gas and pump it in. 😃
 

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Switching to premium for an engine designed for regular offers no benefit. If you want to see if their is a any difference in fuel, try a tank of ethanol-free. May be a performance gain almost certainly a mileage gain. I am getting ready for a long trip and plan on using a tank or two to see if there is any appreciable difference. Too expensive to burn all the time.
Interesting. I have read in a couple of places that 91 octane, ethanol free is good for turbo engines. Also, I believe Costco sells it. And Buccee's - Buccee's is mainly in Texas, but they are branching out to other states. I think their ethanol free gas is meant for boat motors.
 

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Interesting. I have read in a couple of places that 91 octane, ethanol free is good for turbo engines. Also, I believe Costco sells it. And Buccee's - Buccee's is mainly in Texas, but they are branching out to other states. I think their ethanol free gas is meant for boat motors.
Exxon sells ethanol-free 91 octane here (I use the 88).
It's better for turbos because it's Top Tier, nothing to do with octane.
Since they only have two tanks at the station, I figure they must be blending them to get the 88, and thus that fuel will have substantially less than 10% ethanol.

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Has anyone really gotten to the bottom of ethanol debate rather then saying it's better for engine when corn wasn't something we burn in engines. I think this is a gimmick to support the ag corn industry machine rather then to improve gas mileage and engine performance. I seen where the ethanol stated that within few years they could support themselves on ethanol blended gasoline but looks 2021 and they still asking for subsidy to survive? What gives?????
 

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Has anyone really gotten to the bottom of ethanol debate rather then saying it's better for engine when corn wasn't something we burn in engines. I think this is a gimmick to support the ag corn industry machine rather then to improve gas mileage and engine performance. I seen where the ethanol stated that within few years they could support themselves on ethanol blended gasoline but looks 2021 and they still asking for subsidy to survive? What gives?????
No one has claimed that adding Ethanol improves fuel economy. It's actually the opposite. The only reason it was added was to lessen our dependency on foreign oil imports.
 

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Please continue here.
 
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