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For what it's worth, People use their GPS/maps for different purposes. Most use the "go to" mode.That is where they put in a destination and the GPS takes them there. It may not be the way you want to go, but it will get you there. I use the GPS differently most of the time. I build routes that makes the GPS go where and how I want to go.-eg- Redding CA to Indio Ca. That is some 600+ miles. I chose the way I want to go, around places like LA. I put in fuel stops. I can then see easily where I am and where I am going. Can you do that with your smart phone?. Honestly I don't know that answer as I have never used my phone to navigate. Will the phone work to navigate when out of cell phone coverage? Using "go to" works good when you are just running around town, but to put in "go to" on a 600 mile route seems to be a crap shoot to me.
As to frequent destinations, they are all in the "recent", or "saved" places in the GPS.The GPS in my 17 touring works quite good, thanks to BBLee. It has not let me down in the last three years.
I think this is a good example of when the OEM navigation meets needs just fine. Obviously a characteristic of smartphones is the ability to optimally route around traffic, road hazards, road closures, etc., But in order for you to take advantage of this you have to be willing to let the smartphone choose the route.

What you're doing reminds me a lot more of a digital version of choosing a route via an old school paper road atlas.

I ran into a problem with Google maps a year or so ago when I was driving West across New York City during a time when traffic was building very quickly leading into rush hour. I ended up on back roads in White plains and kept getting rerouted back and forth literally making a circle because the optimal route kept changing with the increasing traffic. That didn't get me to abandon Google maps, but did get me better used to limitations. A traffic naive route would obviously have kept me going straight on the interstate.

I've also been in situations where I've ignored Google maps telling me to get off the interstate and go on back roads and ended up stuck behind a road closure for 45 minutes.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

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I think this is a good example of when the OEM navigation meets needs just fine. Obviously a characteristic of smartphones is the ability to optimally route around traffic, road hazards, road closures, etc., But in order for you to take advantage of this you have to be willing to let the smartphone choose the route.

What you're doing reminds me a lot more of a digital version of choosing a route via an old school paper road atlas.

I ran into a problem with Google maps a year or so ago when I was driving West across New York City during a time when traffic was building very quickly leading into rush hour. I ended up on back roads in White plains and kept getting rerouted back and forth literally making a circle because the optimal route kept changing with the increasing traffic. That didn't get me to abandon Google maps, but did get me better used to limitations. A traffic naive route would obviously have kept me going straight on the interstate.

I've also been in situations where I've ignored Google maps telling me to get off the interstate and go on back roads and ended up stuck behind a road closure for 45 minutes.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
Yep, I have learned not to trust any navigation 100%, this is why I often study the suggested route (places I have not gone b4) and make changes as needed, but when it wont let me take the route I wanted I would set it as close as where I wanted and use the birds eye view mode and go where I wanted to take... the nav will re-route, this way I wont get lost because the end destination is still there....
 

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For my 2012 Pilot, I have a Garmin DriveAssist 51 LMT-S GPS with lifetime maps, dash cam, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. I paid $178.99 for it which I think is a bargain. It has other features: lane keeping reminder (I turned it off), notifies of speed limit changes, schools and red light cameras, collision warning, etc.

One advantage, I can store destinations in it and can use it in any vehicle I happen to drive. Being able to update maps for free four times a year for as long as you own the unit is, to me, a nice benefit. One can't do that with OEM built-in navigation systems.

The dash cam takes very good quality video. I bought a Garmin auto friction mount for it. It sets on the dash right in front my my steering wheel and never moves. That location makes it very useful and easy to use.

Although the built-in nav system on the brand new VW Sharan I rented in Germany year before last was nice and very easy to use, especially in setting it to English, I prefer my Garmin. AT 118 mph on the Autobahn, I was not inclined to worry about looking at the middle of the dashboard and trying to use a touchscreen for anything; two hands on the wheel and eyes definitely on the road ahead. I was trying for 120, but ran into a speed limit section before I could make it. :)
 

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Yep, I have learned not to trust any navigation 100%, this is why I often study the suggested route (places I have not gone b4) and make changes as needed, but when it wont let me take the route I wanted I would set it as close as where I wanted and use the birds eye view mode and go where I wanted to take... the nav will re-route, this way I wont get lost because the end destination is still there....
I agree about not trusting any navigation 100%. Experience has shown me that Garmin maps may have information that is several years old. That being said, I have used my Garmin GPS units many times, mostly for setting a destination. I have found the projected time of arrival is exceptionally accurate, never more than 5 minutes off, even on trips of hundreds of miles. That being said, when I go on a trip, I will always have a copy of a printed atlas and/or state roadmap(s). I want to see an overall picture so I can easily plan routes. I'm old enough to remember when gas stations had state maps for free. Too often a GPS will pick a route I would not pick, but knowing where I want to go, it will change the route if I deviate from the one it gave me.
 

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Rather than using "go to", install the Garmin maps on your computer. Then you can plan your trip on the big screen. You can force the GPS to take you on the route of your choosing (-eg- way point on a bypass for example). Unfortunately, I don't know how to transfer the route to the GPS in the CRV. After I am happy with the route, I manually put the route into the nav system in the car and away you go. I have several routes in my CRV nav, many that I use over again. It works well for me.
 
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