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Looking to get some advice. I own a newer subaru but am looking to replace it with something reliable and AWD/4WD. I still owe on my current car and have about 2 years left of payments, which are ~$400/month. If I sell it, I can get $10000 out of it and use part of that to buy a car with cash. I'm hoping to buy a car with cash that will last me the next couple of years so that I can save some money. I was looking at a 1999-2000 CRV or 2006 model. Does this seem like a good plan?
 

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2007 Accord EX 2020 CR-V Hybrid EX
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Welcome to the Forum.
I'll let those with experience with those models suggest what you should look out for.
Just be aware that prices for used vehicles are a bit crazy, but I'm sure you know that.
I'd consider full maintenance records very important, especially these days when folks can sell anything.
Whether you should trade your Subaru is of course up to you, but a well-maintained CR-V can last a long time.
 

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2011 CR-V LX 2wd White / 2003 Suzuki XL_7 Limited 4x4
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Too many variables to consider. An old(er) car is going to cost more than just the purchase. You can count on a fair amount of costs to get it up to snuff and keep it there. And at the end of the road, when you would have had the Suby paid off, instead of having a recent car that you know the history of, your going to have an older car that is worth significantly less, whether for selling, or trading, or keeping. Unless your situation is desperate, I'd recommend keeping the Suby - it will be cheaper in the long run.
 

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What model is your Suburu? If it is one of their more reliable models.....might be a keeper. Better look at that side of the coin also.
 

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As said above. Its a lot of variables.
With your Subaru you know the history and how it has been maintained. Two years is not bad.

If you buy a older vehicle. You dealing with old technology and old safety design. The old CRV will have parts to be replaced as they have reached the end of their life. The engine will be fine. But things around the engine will have to be replaced. Struts, starter, battery, transmission, electrical etc.
My old CRV did not cost much. But every year I had to keep a couple of grand aside for major repairs and replacements. Once most of the replacements had been done over five years. The vehicle had rust issues that could not be repaired.

So the cost of the vehicle will be cheaper. But the cost of maintenance will go up.

If it is a financial issue you are facing rather than a car issue. I would advise speaking to financial advisor. As a former banker myself a lot of these issues can be resolved by restructuring ones finances. I had clients that had finacial issues, car payments etc. By the time they came to me it was too late. A simple restructuring would have helped.

If that does not resolve it. If you need cash and something reliable (I have been there myself). In terms of cost, reliability and depreciation value buys. I would go for a car. Toyota Corrola with winter tires. Its not AWD. But this was my backup plan if my CRV failed.
 

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I own a 2003 CRV, and I have spent roughly $11,000 in maintenance and repairs over the course of 18 years ownership. About $4500 have been in the last 4 years, with a JDM engine and new front suspension being the largest costs. I have a 2003 Element and it has had about $8500 in maintenance and repairs. About $2500 have been in the last 4 years, with the largest costs being new front suspension and a stolen catalytic converter (uninsured). I do the majority of my own work on the vehicles, I presume if you took it to a mechanic, the costs would be higher.
 

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Be sure to look at the entire picture, including insurance rates.
You might think it would cost less to insure an older vehicle but that might not be the case, depending on the safety features.
Of course paying cash would mean not having to carry collision or comprehensive insurance, though I would strongly suggest doing so.
@Tony_Tiger's advice is good, bankers are the ones to ask about financial matters, definitely NOT Car Dealers. :)
 
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I have a 1999 Honda Accord that I've been using as a daily driver, about 72 miles round trip since August. I did have brake and fuel lines replaced 2 years ago, that's something that can go just due to age. In my case, also because of what's put on the roads in the winter to melt snow and ice. I had some other work done before using it for work, I previously had a company vehicle.

Today I put a down payment on a 2012 CR-V, It was between that and a 2009 CR-V. As for reliability, Subarus have declined in that respect in several areas. Three years ago I considered a 1998 CR-V 5MT, but that's when I had a company vehicle. I don't think it's out of the question for a decent 1999-2000 CR-V if you're not going to put a lot of miles on. They can be more reliable than newer vehicles, especially Subarus. Those years though, have a timing belt, rather than chain. Ideally there would be records if/when the timing belt was replaced.
 

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Lots of good advice already here. I have always gone by “trust the devil you know.” I have put about $4k into my V in the last 3 years. I’m a bit worried about it because of rust. The engine is now using some oil and leaking a bit but running strong.

I think an important question is also “what do you like to drive?” Driving in my ‘99 RD1 today I was thinking how much I like it because it fits me like a glove. I’m so used to it and it suits my driving style, needs and we are used to each other lol. I sat in an Audi today. I thought they looked so cool. I got all excited about one at auction. When I got in I had to lower the seat way down to the floor because I’m too tall for the roof. The trunk is a little tiny compartment. Even without driving it I knew it’s not for me. I’m thinking maybe I can get an A7 for a steal of a deal but then I’d have to get rid of my V and have less ground clearance. I’m not so sure it’s worth it.

getting a vehicle with the prospect of it lasting you two or three years isn’t likely to save you any money (and may be unsafe).

A newer CRV than an RD1 will have the k series engine with more horsepower and a timing chain (oh yeah—and the AC system may self destruct on some model years)
 

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A 20+ year old vehicle doesn't seem like great choice, if you can afford otherwise. Just think of how far the safety features have come in that time. I drive a 14 year old Pilot, and I can tell it's getting long in the tooth. It recently stranded me for the first time, and is just getting sloppy all around. I've spent between $1K to $2K a year for the last 3 years fixing issues. I suspect my Pilot will be gone in a year or two when the car market cools down.

(My spouse has the CRV, hence me being on this forum, as I do or coordinate the maintenance)
 

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I get what you want to do here, but it is a real coin toss to be honest, and the used car market is running at high price premiums right now, which means the used car market is full of questionable vehicles that people are scrounging up, washing, wrapping in chewing gum and bailing wire and selling off at premiums unheard of in the used vehicle market.

So.. as always with any consideration of a used vehicle... the quality, condition, and provable maintenance and service history are key. Problem is.. sellers can and will lie and misrepresent.. so buyer beware.

If you score a 2000 model year that is a low mileage cream puff well maintained and service... you have a winner.

If you score someone else's carefully hidden issues and faulty maintenance and service history.. then you end up with the opposite of what you are seeking... instead of a money saver.. you end up with a money pit.

Personally, if it were me, I would stick with the Subaru I know, until it is fully paid off, and then think about a different vehicle to purchase. There is just too much risk in the current used vehicle market due to opportunists finding sneaky ways to cover up and sell questionable vehicles in an overheated sellers market.
 

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And sometimes, folks just need to get out from under a payment every month. Going to an older reliable car in good condition just might help them make the bridge to when they can again afford a nicer car with monthly payments, if desired.
 
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Looking to get some advice. I own a newer subaru but am looking to replace it with something reliable and AWD/4WD. I still owe on my current car and have about 2 years left of payments, which are ~$400/month. If I sell it, I can get $10000 out of it and use part of that to buy a car with cash. I'm hoping to buy a car with cash that will last me the next couple of years so that I can save some money. I was looking at a 1999-2000 CRV or 2006 model. Does this seem like a good plan?
if the miles are low enough or you know of any major replacements. Trans on 1st gen usually last about 240K. Not too expensive though. Personally I would go with an 05-06 , 2nd would be 1st gen but I would skip 2nd gen prior to '05. I've owned 98, 2003 and 2005.
 

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If you go with a 05-06 CRV just know the do not use the same parts as a 2002, 2003, or 2004 though form the outside they look the same. Engineering changed in the headlights, struts, and other parts. I have a 2002 CRV EX 5MT. I am the 4th owner. I purchased in 2015. I been learning how to service. What I've replaced is standard wear-and-tear parts like brakes, VTC gasket and the one on the other side of the valve cover. More recently the radiator so opted to replace original radiator hoses. Overall a good vehicle. I have 180k on it. I bicycle to work so I haven't been putting many miles on it. I had a 1999. My bother has it now. The major problem I had with it was the trailing arm bushings. Luckily the bushings can be replaced without buying a whole trailing arm and can be installed with some creativity without removing the trailing arm from the vehicle. The 1999 was smaller and an automatic. I wanted a stick shift. The 2002 is larger inside. The second generation CRV is the last CRV with a table in the rear wheel well area. Like what other hinted at, there will be service work. If you can do the work then that is a plus. The other thing to consider too like car shortages America Honda also has part shortages. I had a coolant bypass hose I could not get because it is on backorder without a delivery date. I was fortunate O'Reilly's sold Gates replacement hoses and purchased that. Getting available parts is a consideration too.
 

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If you go with a 05-06 CRV just know the do not use the same parts as a 2002, 2003, or 2004 though form the outside they look the same. Engineering changed in the headlights, struts, and other parts. I have a 2002 CRV EX 5MT. I am the 4th owner. I purchased in 2015. I been learning how to service. What I've replaced is standard wear-and-tear parts like brakes, VTC gasket and the one on the other side of the valve cover. More recently the radiator so opted to replace original radiator hoses. Overall a good vehicle. I have 180k on it. I bicycle to work so I haven't been putting many miles on it. I had a 1999. My bother has it now. The major problem I had with it was the trailing arm bushings. Luckily the bushings can be replaced without buying a whole trailing arm and can be installed with some creativity without removing the trailing arm from the vehicle. The 1999 was smaller and an automatic. I wanted a stick shift. The 2002 is larger inside. The second generation CRV is the last CRV with a table in the rear wheel well area. Like what other hinted at, there will be service work. If you can do the work then that is a plus. The other thing to consider too like car shortages America Honda also has part shortages. I had a coolant bypass hose I could not get because it is on backorder without a delivery date. I was fortunate O'Reilly's sold Gates replacement hoses and purchased that. Getting available parts is a consideration too.
The biggest difference in 05-06 and earlier 2nd gens was an extra gear in the automatic transmission
 

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I have heard enough $15,000 horror stories with Outbacks and Foresters that you are probably making a good choice. There was a known engine/trans problem about 10 years ago. Also, a used car dealer friend said they put the water pump in the oil pan! If true, WOW,
My experience is I bought a 2001 CR-V (1st gen) at an auto auction with 98K (it appeared to be a repo). Before it was totaled in an accident at 178K we had no large or out of the ordinary repairs. I bought a 2006 CR-V (2nd gen) also at auction with 77K and it is still running great at 240K. Again no unexpected repairs, biggest was fromt suspension which seemed reasonable at 200+K. It is truly amazing how little replacement is needed for suspension and exhaust parts on a CR-V. No engine or trans issues on either. Because I bought them at auction I spent about $1,000 on each to get it the way I wanted, like second key, cover for the spare tire, etc. which I identified before purchasing. No hidden defects.
Finally, unless you particularly want a narrower car, I would pick a 2nd or 3rd gen (2007 to ?) The interiors and volumn for things are quite different on those 3 generations which would be the deciding factor for me. A friend refuses to replace her 3rd gen because she loves the excellent space on the floor between the arm rest and dash -- perfect to keep a large purse stable and handy. That went away with Gen 4 onward. Good Luck in your search.
 

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Sure, why not? My '99 is the newest car I own. Only issue with some '99 is the Head. They were made incorrect so they pound the Seats down in to the Head. I have that issue with mine. I've played with the Rockets to buy me a lot more adjustment. I have 215K miles on it and I have no plans to redirect soon. As I said, it's the baby of the fleet.
 
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