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I thought I'd start a new thread on this question instead of burying it on page 10 of the official transmission fluid change sticky.

On that sticky, Joe posted an alternative method and a video showing how he changed his transmission fluid. In a nutshell, here is what he did:

1 - Disconnect transmission fluid line at the filter and direct that line into a bucket.

2 - Have someone else sit in vehicle, start it, and then start shifting through the gears. The transmission itself will pump the old fluid out the disconnected line.

3 - While the old fluid is pumping out, another person pours new fluid into the transmission through the dipstick/filler tube.

4 - Stop the vehicle once all old fluid is pumped out (7-8 quarts) and reconnect the line to a new filter.

5 - Drive and check fluid level. Top off if necessary.

That's it! Sounds almost too easy. Just wondering if anyone has tried his method yet. My wife has an 09 with over 50,000 miles on it already and living in Wisconsin I'm interested in changing over to the synthetic DW1 with the sub zero temps here. This seems like the most economical way to change the fluid, getting almost 100% new fluid in and not wasting fluid by draining some of the new with the old in the 4x procedure (which, even after 4x, you are not at 100% new fluid yet you have used several more than the 8 or so quarts this procedure would use). Joe removed his front bumper, but from what I see in the service manual, you should be able to access the filter and lines by just removing the splash shield under the front of the vehicle on our 09 (but I haven't looked or tried that yet to confirm).

I'm curious if anyone has tried this procedure yet or what they think? I would think as long as new fluid is going in at about the same rate the old is coming out, that this should work and be safe for the transmission.

Any thoughts?
 

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My first thought is, while your shifting through the gears and pouring oil in, can you be sure all parts are getting oil to them, while oil is draining too? I don't think I would do this method. My 99 Civic has has it's trans fluid changed every 15K, no flushing and still works like new.
 

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I've done that procedure on a Volvo I had...no negative effects.

Though, it took an extra quart of ATF or two...it was difficult to tell when the new stuff was coming out (it wasn't a day/night type thing).
 

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That plan works for me. Starting at 30K miles, I have drained and filled my transmission once per year. I also drain and fill the read differential once per year. Essentially, at every other oil change I do the transmission and rear differential.

My first thought is, while your shifting through the gears and pouring oil in, can you be sure all parts are getting oil to them, while oil is draining too? I don't think I would do this method. My 99 Civic has has it's trans fluid changed every 15K, no flushing and still works like new.
 

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I've done this for years on other vehicles via the transmission cooler lines BUT, I just leave the vehicle in park. A lovely assistant starts and stops the engine. When I hear the pickup cavitating, I have them shut the engine off so I can put in more fluid with the engine off. This way there is less blending of old and new fluid in the pan. Also, there's something about standing in front of a vehicle with a running engine that just doesn't feel right to me. :Loco:

I usually flush the fluid and then use the vehicle for a few hundred miles and THEN drop the pan and replace the filter. Tranny fluids have a lot of detergent and that breaks loose debris. If the filter is changed at the flush, it ends up needing to be changed again. The new fluid breaks loose debris and clogs the new filter causing drivability issues, so I figure why not let the old filter get a load of that debris and then change it?
 
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