Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just glanced down and noticed a part on the belt where it looks like it's mended/fused together. I assume everyone has this? as how else do they make a belt from one piece? sorry no pics yet as I'm at work...first I was thinking oh no a rip or tear something must have gouged the belt. then I thought about it, and was like wait I think that's the joined pieces...can someone confirm.....thanks...
 

·
Registered
2007 CRV AWD
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Different manufacturers have different methods to produce their products. I assume since the belt is still working that it is a manufacturing sign. Although I haven't seen this much in automotive, Have seen plenty of them in the AMF 82-70 pin setter machines I use to work on.
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
7,025 Posts
just glanced down and noticed a part on the belt where it looks like it's mended/fused together. I assume everyone has this? as how else do they make a belt from one piece? sorry no pics yet as I'm at work...first I was thinking oh no a rip or tear something must have gouged the belt. then I thought about it, and was like wait I think that's the joined pieces...can someone confirm.....thanks...
All serpentine belts I believe will have that fusing seam on them. They may just be easier to see on some then others.

To make a serpentine belt most efficiently from a cost perspective means it will be a long belt cut to length and then the ends fused together in a special welding/fusing machine. I'm sure that is an over simplification as these belts are somewhat exotic in their material and construction, given they are in constant tension and motion when the engine is running.

And before TheDarkKnight comments... I'll beat him to it...... I bet the Germans instead manufacture theirs out of a meticulously milled and trimmed solid plate of exotic rubberized material.... 2% keeper, 98% waste for recycle, and pricing and reliability to go along with it. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
just glanced down and noticed a part on the belt where it looks like it's mended/fused together. I assume everyone has this? as how else do they make a belt from one piece? sorry no pics yet as I'm at work...first I was thinking oh no a rip or tear something must have gouged the belt. then I thought about it, and was like wait I think that's the joined pieces...can someone confirm.....thanks...
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
2017 CRV Touring - Pearl White w Black Interior
Joined
·
7,025 Posts
Notice that what you are seeing in the photo you shared is the diagonal seam (normal and best practice design), AND, the cross fusing of reinforcement fiber (probably Kevlar or similar) from each end and into the seam fusing process. It is the blend of material, including the bonding fiber reinforcement along a diagonal that represents the longest life and best reliability. I think in most cases when they go, its the underside of the belt, with it's little grooves to hold it aligned in the grooved pulleys, that give out first.

That said, the belt will give out someday, but these modern serpentine belts are long life and highly durable. I believe the way the thread the serpentine through the pulley and tension scheme also reduces total load on the belt and it's fabrication.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for easing my mind...thinking this was just the mfg process, but that small doubt in my head drove me nuts...
 

·
Registered
2018 CR-V Touring Modern Steel
Joined
·
62 Posts
If you want to ease your mind some more, just visit an auto parts store and browse through the belts, and look for the join.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top