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2019 CRV EXL. - owned for two weeks >500 miles - wife out of town with vehicle - wouldn’t start next morning. NOT ACCEPTABLE Dealer found no problems - battery a little low so they replaced it. Said checked my vin with Honda and found no recalls, etc. Really don’t feel very good after reading all of the dead batteries posted on the internet. If this happens again I will test Texas Lemon Laws - don’t feel Honda or dealer are making adequate effort. There are lots of lawyers on the internet offering to represent me at no cost to me. Really feel sad that I bought the Honda and will let everyone I know if this happens again. Unfortunately Honda and dealer will wait until I file suit.
 

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2019 CRV EXL. - owned for two weeks >500 miles - wife out of town with vehicle - wouldn’t start next morning. NOT ACCEPTABLE Dealer found no problems - battery a little low so they replaced it. Said checked my vin with Honda and found no recalls, etc. Really don’t feel very good after reading all of the dead batteries posted on the internet. If this happens again I will test Texas Lemon Laws - don’t feel Honda or dealer are making adequate effort. There are lots of lawyers on the internet offering to represent me at no cost to me. Really feel sad that I bought the Honda and will let everyone I know if this happens again. Unfortunately Honda and dealer will wait until I file suit.
Was the battery even at full charge when you took delivery? I ask because a gen5 crv will slowly drain the battery (from full charge) in about 30 days sitting in the lot. And, depending on how much you drove and what type of driving you did.. that alone may not have recharged it fully in the two weeks you have owned it. It is also possible that the battery went fully dead at some point before you took ownership and that can have rather permanent negative effects on a new battery.

Not saying this is the issue, just saying it does happen. Hopefully the dealer checked for any abnormal parasitic drains.. as they have happened in a couple of batches of CRVs since the gen5 released.. and it is always possible there is a subsystem in your CRV that is not powering down properly.

More then likely.. just a bad battery (it happens). Not all battery discussions here have been the same problems or causes... so your going full postal with all the "lemon law" and "filing suit" is a bit over the top.. particularly when the vehicle comes with a bumper to bumper warranty and the dealer did replace the battery under warranty.

By the way.. a brand new Honda vehicle is expected to have, on average, 1.5 failures under warranty and/or formal recalls during the warranty period. Nature of modern motor vehicles.. where literally every new car will have a least one defect during warranty.

Note: Honda does not make their batteries, they buy them from Johnson Controls.. who makes many of the auto batteries put into new cars these day as well as making batteries for Costco, Walmart, all the auto chains, etc.
 

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Welcome to the forum! I definitely understand your frustration. This Texas summer we're having is definitely battery-killing weather. More than fifty 100 degree days, almost in a row, so far, and still not letting up. Add to that the fact that the Group 51 size battery all CR-V's come with is (in my opinion) more appropriately sized for a lawnmower, and there's your recipe for failure. Heck, for the last several years I've even had to replace the giant battery in my F250 every couple of years, and I only buy the best. Of course, given that the good ones have at least a 36-month warranty, they've been replaced for free. Still, the fairly frequent issues have been inconvenient, to say the least.

My solution for the CR-V is this one:


I believe this solution will work for any year model, possibly with some slight variation. It involves replacing the plastic battery tray and cover and hold-down with parts from a 2014 Odyssey. That vehicle comes with a Group 24 battery, which is about twice the battery as the tiny Group 51. The Group 24 unit provides a substantial increase in all battery functions, almost double. The cost of the OEM Honda Odyssey parts is about $25. The larger battery is only slightly more money. For peace of mind and a good power/capacity reserve, it makes good sense to me, so I've already gotten the parts, and will do the swap when the current battery starts down the hill. The only modification involved is the cutting of a couple of slots in the bottom tray for it to fit properly, about a thirty minute job.

I get that new cars are expensive and should work, but I would say that if this is the only issue you experience, it's a fairly simple solution. It's always possible it won't happen again, but I wouldn't count on that. I don't like getting stranded, and neither does my family. They don't make batteries like they used to, either. But I will feel more secure with a bigger battery.

Where in Texas are you? If you're in or near Austin, PM me and I will hook you up with the best mechanic around these parts. He's honest, reasonable, and has been taking great care of me for years now, with not one single issue ever. Meanwhile, enjoy your new ride!
 

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I'll just remind everyone that the first few days of fall are a good time to check the electrolyte in your battery. The summer's warm weather (and the electrical demands of air conditioning and interior fans) can cause the fluid to bake out.


I practice what I preach: our daughter's '19 HR-V almost had exposed plates when I checked the battery a week ago. It is 6 months old with 6K miles on it.
 

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My friend has a 2017 CRV and 2017 Accord. Both had batteries replaced under warranty at about 2 years. I figure if I get 3 - 4 years out of a Honda battery I'm doing good.
 

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Its not just Honda.

A friend was complaining that his Kia's battery failed after 14 months. And Dodge forum members always recommend replacing thier batteries every 3 - 4 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I live in Houston. After 10 days of ownership my wife drove it 150 miles and the next morning the battery was dead. Maybe I wrongly assume that the battery would be fully charged after such a drive. If you google “2019 Honda CR-V Electrical Problems” you will find other people who have had this problem with CRV’s and replacing the battery didn’t solve the problem for them. I hope that those that think a bad battery is the problem will let me know when I should feel good about putting my wife in this brand new vehicle for a trip out of town.
 

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Hopefully the dealer checked for any abnormal parasitic drains.. as they have happened in a couple of batches of CRVs since the gen5 released.. and it is always possible there is a subsystem in your CRV that is not powering down properly.
^^^ This.
 

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This sort of thing always reminds me of the line from the movie Apollo 13, when they were about to launch, and the captain, in a parody of pre-flight airline announcements, said "Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for flying with the US government. Please relax and be secure in the knowledge that this extremely expensive vehicle was carefully and lovingly assembled from parts supplied by the lowest bidder." That's a paraphrase, as I can't recall the exact quote. An apt observation, to say the least.

New vehicles these days are expensive, and they also contain a lot of new tech. Too much, in my opinion. And it's all buggy and as yet untested. And all requires an ever increasingly complex electrical system. So much so, in fact, that they can no longer, in most cases, be diagnosed manually, but require computer diagnostics. Which is a convenient way for dealers to have stranglehold on you. This becomes more true with every passing year, and is, to me, disconcerting and discouraging.

I would have thought that, by now, with the ever-increasing electrical load on the new CR-V, they would have upsized the battery and the whole system by now, for more capacity, storage, and power overall. But no. It still uses the same battery as every other CR-V ever made.

Common sense would then seem to indicate caution in choosing a new vehicle, and in it's early operation. Long gone are the days when we can expect a brand new vehicle to be perfect. Our old-school values no longer apply. These days carmakers just shrug their shoulders and often weasel out of taking responsibility. Our only recourse is to be even more cautious in our choices. That's the reality we now live in, and dealers live in the same one we do.

Given all that, and all that has been said above, it could easily be that the original battery in your new car dried out between the time it was made, shipped in bulk to the assembly plant, where it sat in storage until installed, then shipped to the dealer, where it sat until you took it home. In the current summer heat, I check my battery water once a month. Use distilled water only when it needs some. In your replacement, the same applies. If it dies again, then suspect a parasitic draw, which should be covered by warranty. And be nice to your dealer, who has to deal with this sort of thing daily, but you do have every right to expect results, too. Meanwhile, it might be best to drive it yourself and put your wife in a trusted vehicle until the issue is resolved. Good luck, and let us know how it works out. Meanwhile, looking on the bright side, I just saw where most of the stores' prices on mittens are really low right now. :giggle:
 

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I live in Houston. After 10 days of ownership my wife drove it 150 miles and the next morning the battery was dead. Maybe I wrongly assume that the battery would be fully charged after such a drive. If you google “2019 Honda CR-V Electrical Problems” you will find other people who have had this problem with CRV’s and replacing the battery didn’t solve the problem for them. I hope that those that think a bad battery is the problem will let me know when I should feel good about putting my wife in this brand new vehicle for a trip out of town.
Thanks for joining the CR-V forum and bitchin' so much...

You HAVE a new battery - I HIGHLY DOUBT testing the 'Texas Lemon Laws' for a battery will come to anything more than a good laugh...

Have fun while you are here...

Good luck!
 

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I live in Houston. After 10 days of ownership my wife drove it 150 miles and the next morning the battery was dead. Maybe I wrongly assume that the battery would be fully charged after such a drive. If you google “2019 Honda CR-V Electrical Problems” you will find other people who have had this problem with CRV’s and replacing the battery didn’t solve the problem for them. I hope that those that think a bad battery is the problem will let me know when I should feel good about putting my wife in this brand new vehicle for a trip out of town.
When reading such complaints on the internet.. context is very important.

For example... in the middle of the 2017 gen5 productions runs, some version of software that controls the powerdown of the CRV in connection with the electric brake had a flaw in it, and it would leave the car in a parasitic drain cycle when a certain sequence of events occurred. Honda fairly quickly isolated the cause and issued a software update to affected owners. In the interim to the release of the software update, owners were advised to make sure that they set the parking brake at least 5 seconds before turning off the vehicle... as a temporary work around. This problem though is in the past.. and is not recurring.

Another example... some early spring 2019 owners were suffering dead batteries due to a parasitic drain caused once again by a software bug where the powerdown sequence did not work properly for all systems. And again, Honda isolated the issue fairly quickly and issued a software update to affected owners. This problem though is also past and not recurring. In addition, Honda put a stop sale on all CRVs on dealer lots until the dealer had applied the software update, to insure no more escapes into owners hands.

In both cases above, Honda had good early data on the problem (not as early as some owners would have liked) and also knew exactly what range of VIN numbers would suffer the issues, and issued software updates to those owners vehicles.

Then we have the issue of random failures of batteries shortly into their useful life cycle. These events are random in nature, and were easily corrected with a replacement battery. THIS is an industry wide issue with batteries in new cars, it is NOT limited just to Hondas. It is also an industry wide problem with after market batteries as well... as literally every OEM and after market battery is from the same small number of very large suppliers in todays supply chain.

If a battery is found dead over nite.. the troubleshooting process is pretty straight forward, be it by the dealer, by an auto parts store, or by the owner. 1) You test and eliminate the charging system and alternator as a cause. 2) you check for presence of any abnormal parasitics after power down (a gen5 CRV has a normal powerdown demand of ~ 35 ma.. and if current drain notably above this level is detected.... then the root cause needs to be tracked down and fixed (be it hardware or software). 3) A load test on the battery will confirm if all the cells are in spec, and the battery has normal CCA capacity. If not, the battery gets immediately replaced.

All of the above troubleshooting is very routine for any dealer, or even an owner with a low cost dynamic battery testing unit. So it's not rocket science by any means and therefore not subject to a lot of uncertainty or ambiguity.

In your case... it actually sounds like you simply had a defective battery, most likely a defective plate in one of the cells that somehow shorted (or opened) during that 150 mile trip your wife took (essentially the first real road stress test of your vehicle). It happens. The odds of it happening on a random replacement battery into the same vehicle is extremely small. I say this because there has been no recent posts about a flurry of dead batteries in gen5 CRVs recently... either brand new ones off the dealer lot, or older vehicles. There have been some reports of early failure (as in 2 years in on a battery), but frankly.. given the wide range of temperature and driving conditions, this is within normal failure rates for today's flooded cell car batteries.

Yes, it sucks to have problems with a brand new vehicle purchased... but sometimes it does happen. If it never happened, there would be no need for bumper to bumper warranties on new vehicles.
 

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Could this be the Powertrain Control Module not shutting off the Evaporative Emissions leak test pump which is covered under service bulletin 19-039?
 

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Welcome to the forum! I definitely understand your frustration. This Texas summer we're having is definitely battery-killing weather. More than fifty 100 degree days, almost in a row, so far, and still not letting up. Add to that the fact that the Group 51 size battery all CR-V's come with is (in my opinion) more appropriately sized for a lawnmower, and there's your recipe for failure. Heck, for the last several years I've even had to replace the giant battery in my F250 every couple of years, and I only buy the best. Of course, given that the good ones have at least a 36-month warranty, they've been replaced for free. Still, the fairly frequent issues have been inconvenient, to say the least.

My solution for the CR-V is this one:


I believe this solution will work for any year model, possibly with some slight variation. It involves replacing the plastic battery tray and cover and hold-down with parts from a 2014 Odyssey. That vehicle comes with a Group 24 battery, which is about twice the battery as the tiny Group 51. The Group 24 unit provides a substantial increase in all battery functions, almost double. The cost of the OEM Honda Odyssey parts is about $25. The larger battery is only slightly more money. For peace of mind and a good power/capacity reserve, it makes good sense to me, so I've already gotten the parts, and will do the swap when the current battery starts down the hill. The only modification involved is the cutting of a couple of slots in the bottom tray for it to fit properly, about a thirty minute job.

I get that new cars are expensive and should work, but I would say that if this is the only issue you experience, it's a fairly simple solution. It's always possible it won't happen again, but I wouldn't count on that. I don't like getting stranded, and neither does my family. They don't make batteries like they used to, either. But I will feel more secure with a bigger battery.

Where in Texas are you? If you're in or near Austin, PM me and I will hook you up with the best mechanic around these parts. He's honest, reasonable, and has been taking great care of me for years now, with not one single issue ever. Meanwhile, enjoy your new ride!
I did this with my 2015 CRV. It died twice. I thought it was a bad battery after the second trip to the dealer where they told me "don't run the wipers and the radio plus charge my cell phone and expect my battery to be charged after I reach my destination". Went to Costco, replaced it. The problem didn't return but I still didn't feel "safe" even with a jump charger in my tailgate. I found another post like "kloker" mentioned where they got a battery tray from a pilot and a larger batter , such as a Honda Pilot battery. Have looked back since.
My guess, Honda went small with the battery (capacity and quality) and didn't take into account the more modern accessories drain the battery so much quicker. I.e. you can't run the car in accessory mode for 20-30mins while charging the phone and have the main hud screen on. Bad.
 

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2019 CRV EXL. - owned for two weeks >500 miles - wife out of town with vehicle - wouldn’t start next morning. NOT ACCEPTABLE Dealer found no problems - battery a little low so they replaced it. Said checked my vin with Honda and found no recalls, etc. Really don’t feel very good after reading all of the dead batteries posted on the internet. If this happens again I will test Texas Lemon Laws - don’t feel Honda or dealer are making adequate effort. There are lots of lawyers on the internet offering to represent me at no cost to me. Really feel sad that I bought the Honda and will let everyone I know if this happens again. Unfortunately Honda and dealer will wait until I file suit.
I personally wouldn't waist the time. Everyone, including them, know they are wrong. In the mean time, put a bigger battery in there, buy a jump charger in the case there is a charging or draining problem and save the receipts. If it is wide spread and they will eventually put out a fix. When they do, ask them to pay for the battery and jump charger.
Enjoy the new car in the mean time and try to ignore Honda's recent attitude to customers with issues like this; it isn't worth our time.
 

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2019 CRV EXL. - owned for two weeks >500 miles - wife out of town with vehicle - wouldn’t start next morning. NOT ACCEPTABLE Dealer found no problems - battery a little low so they replaced it. Said checked my vin with Honda and found no recalls, etc. Really don’t feel very good after reading all of the dead batteries posted on the internet. If this happens again I will test Texas Lemon Laws - don’t feel Honda or dealer are making adequate effort. There are lots of lawyers on the internet offering to represent me at no cost to me. Really feel sad that I bought the Honda and will let everyone I know if this happens again. Unfortunately Honda and dealer will wait until I file suit.
They just keep adding technology that sucks power from the battery but they don't upgrade the batteries in these cars. I don't know how they expect them to last the first month never mind the full warranty of the battery!
 

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Does anyone know if a pilot or RDX battery tray will fit in a gen5? I don't know that anyone has reported that it fits. I definitely would be interested in trying...
Not sure of the battery sizes used in the RDX, but the Odyssey and (I suspect) the Pilot use the Group 24. All CR-V's use the Group 51. Aside from size, you also need to be sure of matching post locations. There is no extra length to your battery cables to accommodate a longer reach, so that is a limiting factor if you don't want the added headache and expense of figuring out what OEM battery cables would be longer and otherwise match. I do know that the Group 24's match up and the swap will work with the stock cables and the addition of the tray, box, and hold-down from the '14 Odyssey, as discussed in the link I posted above . Here's you a handy size chart that shows battery dimensions:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Does anyone know if this change to a group 24 battery will work as described earlier on my 2019 CR-V EXL???
 

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I know the OE CRV battery is wrapped with insulation, but how about the bottom?.......any insulation on the bottom as well?

Since the battery sits above a very toasty CVT (215F+ tranny temps observed daily for months now), I don't think removing battery insulation, so the battery box will accommodate a bigger battery, would be a good idea.
 

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2019 CRV EXL. - owned for two weeks >500 miles - wife out of town with vehicle - wouldn’t start next morning. NOT ACCEPTABLE Dealer found no problems - battery a little low so they replaced it. Said checked my vin with Honda and found no recalls, etc. Really don’t feel very good after reading all of the dead batteries posted on the internet. If this happens again I will test Texas Lemon Laws - don’t feel Honda or dealer are making adequate effort. There are lots of lawyers on the internet offering to represent me at no cost to me. Really feel sad that I bought the Honda and will let everyone I know if this happens again. Unfortunately Honda and dealer will wait until I file suit.
Make sure your wife unplugs any accessories connected to the electrical system outlets as they will contribute to the battery drain in addition to the car's computer.
 
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