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Discussion Starter #1

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That 2nd set is basically what I have for my ’09 CRV and I’ve had no issue loading tons of stuff up there for about 3 years now. Best part is you can make him an offer on the price! Had similar for my Ridgeline with same great results
 

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Well, I'm passing on these rails, for a few reasons. Mainly because we found out the CRV is not best car for us to transport a kayak on the roof, and because I don't feel comfortable removing the trim on the roof and potentially drilling into it to install the rails. (no instructions included with them).

We tried some Thule clamp-on style of racks with a set of slide n' glide Thule pads, not ideal I know but it showed us just how high to lift something on the roof, and definitely not possible for a senior citizen to do alone. The Clamp style racks made it even worse because the rear rack is half way up the back doors. So that all got refunded in a hurry.

Now I'm feeling pretty discouraged that we bought the wrong vehicle. I realize a trailer is about the easiest kayak transporting option there is, we just haven't given it much thought because of the space needed to store it and the added cost of a hitch. We're actually wondering if trading this car for something more manageable for a senior citizen is best. If anyone has suggestions please don't hesitate.
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So you're saying that you have to screw into the roof to install them? I thought the roof already has the tracks pre-installed to accept these rails? Or is that maybe different by trim level?
 

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It would be a lot cheaper to get a hitch installed with wiring harness and get a kayak trailer than trading the vehicle in. I bought a hitch from U-Haul with a lifetime warrant for $250ish. It's a bit more for the wiring harness, but that's the route I suggest. As for storing the trailer, just put a lock on the ball connection and leave it in the driveway.
 

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If I was a Kayaker I would go the trailer route. I am a biker so I went with a hitch and bike rack. Carrying a bike, mountain or road (or a kayak) on the top of my CRV would not be an option for multiple reasons. First, I'm short so getting anything on top of my CRV would be difficult. Second, putting something on or taking it off the top of my CRV could create damage to the roof of my vehicle causing it to rust prematurely. Third, I used to carry my bike and others on the top of my 92 Honda Accord and that experience has taught me carrying something on top of my car, bike or anything, is not very aerodynamic both for fuel mileage and for the handling of the vehicle.
 

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I have been looking for a kayak carrying system, too, preferably one that allows a single person to load the kayak. This one is very intriguing and can mount to the factory crossbars as well as third party crossbars - Thule 887xt Slipstream

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRSzdcAr6Vg

Search YouTube and you will find lots of people showing how the unit works for them.

Do some googling for price. You can find prices much better than REI and Thule list. There are also some copy-cat systems out there.

Let me know what you find that works for you.
 

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If you are going to go with a third party system like Thule or Yakima for crossbars, then you can get into the Thule Hullivator system if you want something really awesome for putting a kayak on the roof. Not cheap but it assists with the lifting of the kayak and it is less money than what you will lose on trading for a new vehicle. Check Craigslist for a used Hullivator.
 

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Well, I'm passing on these rails, for a few reasons. Mainly because we found out the CRV is not best car for us to transport a kayak on the roof, and because I don't feel comfortable removing the trim on the roof and potentially drilling into it to install the rails. (no instructions included with them).

We tried some Thule clamp-on style of racks with a set of slide n' glide Thule pads, not ideal I know but it showed us just how high to lift something on the roof, and definitely not possible for a senior citizen to do alone. The Clamp style racks made it even worse because the rear rack is half way up the back doors. So that all got refunded in a hurry.

Now I'm feeling pretty discouraged that we bought the wrong vehicle. I realize a trailer is about the easiest kayak transporting option there is, we just haven't given it much thought because of the space needed to store it and the added cost of a hitch. We're actually wondering if trading this car for something more manageable for a senior citizen is best. If anyone has suggestions please don't hesitate.
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What did you find out that made the CR-V not a great choice for a kayak on the roof? My sone as a kayak and we had talked about various options. I looked at the instructions for installing the side roof rails on my EX and I was not thrilled at drilling and cutting (at 7 mm, not 8 or 6) and having it look messed up. I agree, the trailer option is probably the best. Storing it can be an issue based upon your individual situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Mainly the height of the vehicle, I simply did not do my homework when shopping for this car, knowing full well a senior would be using it the most, can only blame myself. My bias toward Hondas is what pushed us to it. It's clear to me now we should have got a wagon of some kind with factory roof racks.

The Hullivator is a nice option as well, we did look at that too, although it was limited to certain mounting systems when used without factory rails. Again we were burned by my shortsightedness.

For a test, I put the kayak inside with the seats folded, and made my own tie down point inside the rear hatch door so it would close at least down to the kayak. This arrangement blocked my passenger side window and mirror, and the rear view mirror was useless. I could not travel farther than a few blocks with it this way.

Bottom line: do not buy a CRV without factory rails if you ever want to carry something on the roof.
 

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I have been using the Thule Slipstream 887 for about a month for a fairly large and hefty kayak. So far, I have been pleased (if your are buying used, you want get the newer XT version that is longer if your CRV is Gen 3 or newer!). It may not be for everyone but it minimizes the issue for lifting if you use it correctly. You do have to pay attention when loading that you keep the kayak moving straight on the roller and stiff winds can affect things during loading if you have a very light kayak. It sure beats lifting a kayak by yourself up on to the roof.

The Hullivator just isn't a practical option for a CRV in my opinion. It requires longer non-factory bars that stick out to the side more than I like. Then when the Hullivator is attached it sticks out even more to the side. It is an awesome system to use but it is just too big on a CRV.
 

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If I were you I would go with the trailer instead for easier way on carrying and hauling kayaks. I've couple of customized trailers carrying 4 or more kayaks.
 

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I'm fortunate to live on a river (it's 20' wide maybe!! I'm sure they call it a river so they can inflate the property taxes) and there are several local companies that offer rental kayaks where they drop you at the source and pick you up where it dumps into an actual river. They use vans towing trailers which really are a basic skeleton that they can lash them to - seems to work just fine for them. If you had a complete axle, I'd bet a decnt welding shop could build you one for a reasonable cost !! I'll take some pics of one if it interests you. Craig
 
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