Honda CR-V Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For those of you with AWD, what mileage approximately did your Maintenance Minder come up with a B6 telling you to change the rear differential fluid? Was it less than 40000 miles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
The 2006 CR-V didn't have the Maintenance Minder and the Maintenance Schedule said:

Rear Differential Fluid Change - Every 60,000miles (96,000 km) or every 4 years, whichever comes first

I would add "or if the rear differential is making noise".
To check for noise find an empty parking lot.
Roll down the window and stick your head out, and drive slowly in a tight circle, but not with the steering wheel at full lock. Drive circles both clockwise and counterclockwise.
You're listening for a moaning or groaning noise coming from underneath your CR-V.

If you hear the noise change the rear diff fluid.
 

·
Super Moderator
1997, 2002, 2017 my expertese lies there
Joined
·
4,954 Posts
Break in fluid, I not prolong to 60K .

Oil filters are every other Oil fluid change out A1 oil only. when ever A2 comes on that is the oil and filter. So that said I do what you used to do Old school style but keep a mental note. Rotate your tires every 5K

OH WAIT all these mix match answers. welcome to the Internet,!
 

·
Registered
2017 CRV EX AWD
Joined
·
1,459 Posts
The rear diff came up at about 15k for me, dealer changed and all good for a while The brake check one Came up at 17k but not doing that till exactly 3 yrs of ownership and battery swap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Is the transfer case oil supposed to also be changed at the same time as the rear differential fluid? Is there also a separate front differential fluid to change, or is that integrated into the CVT?

What fluid do you guys use? 80W-90 full synthetic gear oil?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,914 Posts
The rear differential in a CR-V is not the same as a rear differential in a standard rear wheel drive vehicle.
The only thing to put in the rear differential of a CR-V is Honda Dual Pump Fluid II. You'll need 1.1 qts and two crush washers. Remember to loosen the fill bolt first, and then remove the drain bolt.

The front transfer case is part of the transmission and does not require a separate fluid change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
The rear diff came up at about 15k for me, dealer changed and all good for a while The brake check one Came up at 17k but not doing that till exactly 3 yrs of ownership and battery swap
BoostedV - I'm curious about your plan to not service the brakes until 3 years have passed. Are you thinking that they are covered under warranty?
 

·
Registered
2017 CRV EX AWD
Joined
·
1,459 Posts
BoostedV - I'm curious about your plan to not service the brakes until 3 years have passed. Are you thinking that they are covered under warranty?
yes sorry , like racoon said.
they always fo the routine honda checks during my regular oil change etc but going to do the flush at 3 years.

ive never kept a car past 2.5yrs and always have bought new since 18, however since my wife has a free work car i plan on keeping the crv since it gets used minimally.
My logic is if they were to pull her free work truck id have a low miles well maintained crv to be the ‘run around car’ lol
 

·
Registered
17 CRV EXL AWD, 14 CRV EXL AWD
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
Is the transfer case oil supposed to also be changed at the same time as the rear differential fluid? Is there also a separate front differential fluid to change, or is that integrated into the CVT?

What fluid do you guys use? 80W-90 full synthetic gear oil?
The CRV doesn't have a transfer case or a separate front differential. The transmission provides all those functions. The transmission has three outputs, left/right front drive shafts and a propeller shaft for the rear wheels. The rear differential contains a differential gear but also contains a hydraulically actuated clutch and an electrically powered hydraulic pump. Normally the clutch is open and no torque is transferred from the propeller shaft to the rear wheels. When the system determines that torque to the rear wheels is needed the clutch is actuated. The amount of torque is controlled by how much hydraulic pressure is applied to the clutch plates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
The CRV doesn't have a transfer case or a separate front differential. The transmission provides all those functions. The transmission has three outputs, left/right front drive shafts and a propeller shaft for the rear wheels. The rear differential contains a differential gear but also contains a hydraulically actuated clutch and an electrically powered hydraulic pump. Normally the clutch is open and no torque is transferred from the propeller shaft to the rear wheels. When the system determines that torque to the rear wheels is needed the clutch is actuated. The amount of torque is controlled by how much hydraulic pressure is applied to the clutch plates.
Very cool, I wasn't aware of that. So just to make sure I understand clearly, there is no transfer case with gear oil that has to be changed, only a propeller that sends power to the rear wheels when AWD is activated. The rear differential fluid gets changed at 15,000 miles using OEM Dual Pump Fluid II. Not at all like some other AWD vehicles. And I know this question is a bit off topic, but since I asked about the front differential being integrated into the CVT, my understanding is that as long as the check bolt on the CVT is removed as it should be when draining and refilling the OEM CVT fluid, it's basically impossible to overfill, since the excess will simply drip out of the check bolt opening. Does that make sense and is there anything else I should know? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
17 CRV EXL AWD, 14 CRV EXL AWD
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
Correct, no transfer case like a 4x4 truck or Jeep would have. As for the CVT fluid change, you're basically correct. There is a couple of additional steps where you warm up the transmission. Drain the fluid with the check bolt in and fill the transmission with the approx quantity of fluid plus a little extra. Start the engine, run through the gear shift positions. Than remove the check bolt to see if a little fluid drains out. I would also suggest you make a note of how much fluid drains out so you'll have a good idea how much to replace.
There are a few Youtube videos on the internet which go thru a CVT fluid change on the CRVs.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
10,724 Posts
Isn't it important to check CVT fluid level with a WARM transmission?:unsure: Because the fluid expands when hot.

I know this is important with Fords.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Isn't it important to check CVT fluid level with a WARM transmission?:unsure: Because the fluid expands when hot.

I know this is important with Fords.
When you have a dipstick to check it, yeah, sure. The CR-V (at least newer models, not sure about the prevous generation that had CVTs) has a check bolt. There's no dipstick. Follow Traylaw's instructions on how to drain and refill CVT fluid. If done correctly, it will be at the proper level.
 

·
Everything in Moderation
2006 CR-V EX, 5MT
Joined
·
10,724 Posts
The Ford transmissions without a dipstick require you to have a warmed-up transmission. THEN you remove the fill/level bolt and assure that the ATF is just dribbling out.

Chrysler and BMWs with the ZF transmissions have the same (warmed-up) procedure.

Which was why I was asking for clarification.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top