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I love my 2018 Honda CR-V EX. I am the original owner and only have 9000 miles on it. I recently found that my battery was dead. I have a HALO battery charge and used it to jump the battery and it worked. I haven't been driving my car much as I am working at home now. I wonder could this be because I haven't driven the car much lately. I have had Hondas for years and other than an oil change I never had a problem. This is the first time. So after I charged the battery I drove approx. 10 miles and then the next morning the battery was dead again. I have jumped it 3 times. Is this a known problem with 2018 CR-V?

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Its not a crv problem unless u have parasitic draw.

the 2018 crv went on sale 10/18/2017 so perhaps yours was an earlier one and is now 3 yrs ish . Swing by the dealer and get a free one and call it a day
 

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'07 CR-V EX-L AWD
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Welcome to the forum! I recommend you get yourself a battery tender. There are YouTube videos on this. The little Group 51R battery doesn't have much reserve power, and will run down in about a week or less. A ten mile drive is not enough to recharge up to full. You can also get the battery tested to see if it is going weak and needs replacing.
 

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Just to provide some objective and tested facts here, a normally functioning 51R battery (at full charge) in a normally functioning CRV.... will last between 30-35 days before being depleted by the normal low power parasitic drain of a gen5 CRV (which has been measured and confirmed by multiple owners as 30-50ma).

If your battery is low in charge when you power down your vehicle.. then you have less days before discharge. In the dual charge environment of a Honda, where the system puts your battery into a low charge state once the sensing circuits detect it being fully charged while driving... you may only have 20 or so days if you happen to power down right before the charging system re-tops your battery charge.

There is a myth circulating that replacing a good 51R battery with a group 24 or similar battery will solve this issue of normal parasitic depletion. This is patently false. A larger battery will provide perhaps another 20% reserve power vs a 51R.. and if you do the math.. that buys you one more week of useful reserve power on said larger battery vs a 51R. Don't believe me.. simply check the reserve capacity specs for a 51R vs a group 24. Note: you can find some 51Rs that are spec'ed higher in reserve capacity than the OEM 51R.. but even then.. it does not change the parasitic drain profile in any notable way.

The only real benefit of a group 24 battery (or similar larger battery) is more CCA.. which frankly except in super cold weather conditions.. is simply not needed for a 1.5T Honda engine.. which starts very quickly and easily.

Periodically test and maintain your battery, and if you are going to leave your vehicle idle for 2+ weeks.. put it on a smart battery maintainer. That will largely prevent you from ever getting into your CRV and finding it unable to start due to depleted battery.
 

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The misunderstanding is the 鈥渞eserve capacity鈥 interpretation.

Reserve capacity on the label is not the entire reserve capacity being discussed.

If there are a significant number of CCAs in excess of what鈥檚 needed, then not only do you have a longer period of time that it can sit unused and not discharge, it also allows the battery to be significantly more discharged and still have enough CCAs in reserve to start the car.

It also allows for the battery to be in far worse condition and still start the car. A bad or failing cell can be overcome by the addition CCAs supplied by the other cells.

The larger battery is also less stressed in doing the required job day after day, which leads to a longer life.
 

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I'm one of those people that doesn't have any clue about auto battery sizes or groups. When I need a battery I open the hood and see what it says so I can go buy a replacement, or check online for the proper "size".

With all this talk about batteries (in this thread and others here) not being big enough for the 5th Gen CR-V, I went to my garage and looked at the label on my newly acquired 2020 Touring. It has start/stop, and was fairly sure I had read that vehicles with this technology had "enhanced" starters and batteries. The battery in my car says 4A 31500-TLA-A11 "for Start/Stop" 450 Cold Cranking Amps on it.

I really have no idea how this compares with the 51R mentioned numerous times here.

Additionally, I can tell you when I had my 2018 Touring, we frequently let it sit more than 2 weeks without the use if any battery tenders, and had absolutely no issues when we came to restart the CRV.
 

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I'm one of those people that doesn't have any clue about auto battery sizes or groups. When I need a battery I open the hood and see what it says so I can go buy a replacement, or check online for the proper "size".

With all this talk about batteries (in this thread and others here) not being big enough for the 5th Gen CR-V, I went to my garage and looked at the label on my newly acquired 2020 Touring. It has start/stop, and was fairly sure I had read that vehicles with this technology had "enhanced" starters and batteries. The battery in my car says 4A 31500-TLA-A11 "for Start/Stop" 450 Cold Cranking Amps on it.

I really have no idea how this compares with the 51R mentioned numerous times here.

Additionally, I can tell you when I had my 2018 Touring, we frequently let it sit more than 2 weeks without the use if any battery tenders, and had absolutely no issues when we came to restart the CRV.
31500-TLA-A11 is Honda's part number for a 410 CCA 51R battery
31500-SR1-100M is Honda's part number for a 500 CCA 51R battery
Both batteries are physically identical and interchangeable, the 500 CCA has a higher capacity but is a little more expensive.
 

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The misunderstanding is the 鈥渞eserve capacity鈥 interpretation.

Reserve capacity on the label is not the entire reserve capacity being discussed.

If there are a significant number of CCAs in excess of what鈥檚 needed, then not only do you have a longer period of time that it can sit unused and not discharge, it also allows the battery to be significantly more discharged and still have enough CCAs in reserve to start the car.

It also allows for the battery to be in far worse condition and still start the car. A bad or failing cell can be overcome by the addition CCAs supplied by the other cells.

The larger battery is also less stressed in doing the required job day after day, which leads to a longer life.

Factually incorrect.

CCA, has no direct correlation with reserve capacity and is meaningless if the charge on the battery is depleted.

Reserve capacity is an industry standard measure of starter batteries, and is easily converted to amp hours of charge in the battery. In other words, reserve capacity is a standardized method of stating how many amp hours a battery holds when at saturation charge level, and gives owners the ability to calculate how long a battery will last under X parasitic current drain. CCA on the other hand, correlates to plate resistance, where lower plate resistance = higher CCA under otherwise identical conditions.

A 51R is typically spec'ed at 85 minutes reserve capacity @ 25 amps. This converts to ~32-35 amp hours of charge. The use of the reference standard of @25 amps is to enable the buyer to compare the actual stored charge in a particular battery vs another particular battery on an apples to apples comparison. Flooded cell batteries deplete at accelerated rates when more than 25 amps demand is placed on them over time. Since all parasitics in motor vehicles (both normal and abnormal) is generally low level current compared to the reference standard of 25Amp, you need to convert to amp hours to calculate how long the battery will last under a particular parasitic.

To illustrate how factually incorrect you are being here... let me give you an example:
You can in fact buy lithium starter batteries in a range of vehicle battery size standards (the price premium is 6x to 10x though). A 51R for example is available that can produce 1000 CCA.... largely because lithium batteries have much higher surge current capabilities compared to other battery types. Yet... said battery only has a 60 minute reserve capacity (ie: 20% less actual stored charge compared to the typical flooded cell 51R.

By comparison.. a flooded cell 51R will have a CCA rating of 410-460, and a reserve capacity of 85-100 minutes @25 amps. Said battery will last about 20-30% longer under a long term parasitic load compared to the lithium version.. yet can only deliver about half the CCA.

How to calculate how long a fully charged battery will last with the vehicle sitting idle:
Reserve capacity in minutes divided by 60 then multiplied by 25 = actual amp hours of charge in a fully charged battery. Then multiply parasitic current by 24 and divide actual amp hours of the battery by the resulting number = days sitting idle before battery is depleted.

Generally speaking, I would expect a good, but nearly depleted battery will still be able to start a gen5 CRV as long as it has 10% reserve charge left on it. By the way.. the actual battery voltage at 10% remaining charge would be ~ 11.5 vdc. You may see some glitching of systems at startup... such as the head unit rebooting due to low voltage during start, but the vehicle will start none the less.
 

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31500-TLA-A11 is Honda's part number for a 410 CCA 51R battery
31500-SR1-100M is Honda's part number for a 500 CCA 51R battery
And to add one additional piece of data...

If you actually test a 31500-TLA-A11 CCA, a good battery will actually typically test closer to 500 CCA, and a 31500-SR1-100M will test closer to 615 CCA.

In other words, CCA spec ratings on batteries are conservative.. and this is probably due to the CCA rating being what the manufacturer expects from an aged battery (ie: 3+ years old).

CCA is however a great measure for plate quality and electrolyte integrity ... so in my monthly battery maintenance checks....when I see my CCA test results show CCA dropping from my historical measurements... I know it is time to replace the battery as it is nearing end of life.
 

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Lots of perfectly healthy newer vehicles have potential battery issues, especially those with a small-ish battery that are driven infrequently and mostly short trips. A simple solution is regular use of a battery maintainer.

Get a CTEK!

I agree with your advice, except I prefer NOCO :) CTEK has a good reputation though, so it largely comes down to preference.

I put one on my vehicles once a month to give the battery a really good saturation charge, to help prolong battery life... mainly because most Hondas never actually keep your battery fully topped up (due the way the dual charge control system works).
 

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I agree with your advice, except I prefer NOCO :) CTEK has a good reputation though, so it largely comes down to preference.

I put one on my vehicles once a month to give the battery a really good saturation charge, to help prolong battery life... mainly because most Hondas never actually keep your battery fully topped up (due the way the dual charge control system works).
Don't get me started on Honda's implementation of Dual Mode Charging where they sacrifice battery life for a tiny improvement in MPG.馃槨
 

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31500-TLA-A11 is Honda's part number for a 410 CCA 51R battery
31500-SR1-100M is Honda's part number for a 500 CCA 51R battery
Both batteries are physically identical and interchangeable, the 500 CCA has a higher capacity but is a little more expensive.
And what do the words "for start/stop" mean? Nothing?
 

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Williamsji

You still don鈥檛 seem to understand the advantage of the larger battery. You just want to repeatedly report numbers off the label. Real world results, from Honda owners, plus just about everybody in the Marine Industry, indicates larger batteries give you more of a cushion (I鈥檒l stop using the word reserve because you get hung up on one specific meaning) when it comes to pushing the battery to its limits.

In this series of threads the term reserve is being use as the amount of CCAs over and above what鈥檚 required to start a Honda.

The bigger the delta the more times you can start the car without draining the battery to a point where either it won鈥檛 start the car. Or it does damage to the battery from being highly stressed with low voltage (undercharged)

If that鈥檚 only 25% better, that may cover 75% of the 鈥渘o start鈥 situations. And from reading threads about replacing Honda batteries with larger ones, it appears the anecdotal evidence indicates good to great results.
 

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Mine will last about a week, in cool weather, less in summer heat, give or take a couple of days, before it gets low enough to not want to crank enough to start. That's in my '07. Of course, I'm retired, and make infrequent trips for short distances. The battery is less than a year old. The car has no measurable amount of parasitic draw and no starter draw issues. My retired neighbors with V's report about the same. The V owners around here who still work report no issues, as they drive every day. I would expect the same. But the idea that a 51R, or any battery, would sit for 30-35 days with no issues is just not so. Never seen it, ever, in real life, in a post reported here, or from anyone. I don't care how it works out on paper, I live in reality, where it absolutely does not work out that way.

At my next battery replacement I will be going larger, and it will give me enough more reserve so that I will feel just a little more confident with it, especially after an audio upgrade. That's all I'm looking for.

The rest is hype. Do what works for you. That's what I do.
 

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My wife鈥檚 CRV has a larger non stock battery and it sits for many weeks at a time, we鈥檝e never had a problem starting it.

It gets below 0F here in the winter too.

The dealer put in the larger non stock battery before it left the lot because the stock battery was already dead and wouldn鈥檛 hold a charge.
 
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