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So I just picked up a used cpo 2019 exl. My wife called me today and said that the car will not start. Had all the typical signs of dead battery so I jumped it and all is well. I noticed she had the lights set to on when I checked instead of auto. I was thinking that would drain the battery. However when I test that and leave the lights on in that position the lights turn off after 30 seconds. So I am thinking that even though the lights were in on position it should not have drained the battery. Am I right in this assumption?

I bringing it back to the dealer Friday. It does seem like this is the milage and time frame where these batteries die. But wouldn't they have noticed this during the supposed 182 point check?

Thanks for any info.
Our 2018 CRV has failed to start 6 times since purchasing it new in April, 2018. Our local Honda dealership (Tucson) has not been able to find the cause and neither was one in Albuquerque, NM this past summer. If you go online you will find there are at least two class action lawsuits filed against Honda for a "parasitic battery drain" problem. We haven't joined either one since we MIGHT have found a cure of sorts: we now carry one of those small lithium batteries used to jump-start cars. One time it failed & we had to call AAA. The second time we connected it and it didn't start but then I disconnected it again & it worked on the second try. Of course, it helps to have two people, one in the vehicle and the other by the battery but one person could manage by themselves. We also had times when the display panel would start flashing & so forth but the system returned to normal after stopping and then restarting it after a short break. We filed two problem/incident reports with Honda America but Honda never replied except for acknowledging receipt of our first report. I also reported it to NHTSA without receiving a reply. We get up to 36 MPG while driving a loaded vehicle on a freeway and otherwise like the CRV. Naturally, dependability is still an issue!
It was this model at 159.99. I believe the factory battery is rated at 410CCA so this would be an 18% improvement, not the 40% that I claimed in my last post.

NAPA The Legend Professional Battery BCI No. 51R 500 A Wet
Forgot to add to the 2018 CRV failing to start from Tucson: we are now on our third battery, a top-of-the-line from AAA. The 1st Honda battery failed after one year.
It was this model at 159.99. I believe the factory battery is rated at 410CCA so this would be an 18% improvement, not the 40% that I claimed in my last post.

NAPA The Legend Professional Battery BCI No. 51R 500 A Wet
So I just picked up a used cpo 2019 exl. My wife called me today and said that the car will not start. Had all the typical signs of dead battery so I jumped it and all is well. I noticed she had the lights set to on when I checked instead of auto. I was thinking that would drain the battery. However when I test that and leave the lights on in that position the lights turn off after 30 seconds. So I am thinking that even though the lights were in on position it should not have drained the battery. Am I right in this assumption?

I bringing it back to the dealer Friday. It does seem like this is the milage and time frame where these batteries die. But wouldn't they have noticed this during the supposed 182 point check?

Thanks for any info.
 

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You would think they should do a a battery stress test as part of their wonderful point check. It's a joke. Dealer's gamble on this. Don't ever feel comfortable by this Dealer Approved stuff.
Even if they did, none of it would make a blind bit of difference if someone leaves the lights on and flattens said battery - which is what the OP's wife did.
 

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Even if they did, none of it would make a blind bit of difference if someone leaves the lights on and flattens said battery - which is what the OP's wife did.
Maybe I'm missing something - but didn't the OP say his car automatically turns off the headlights soon after car is turned off - even if set to ON versus AUTO? My 2018 CRV EXL does that too.
 

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Maybe I'm missing something - but didn't the OP say his car automatically turns off the headlights soon after car is turned off - even if set to ON versus AUTO? My 2018 CRV EXL does that too.
The OP said:

she had the lights set to on when I checked instead of auto
:)

Hence, flat battery 👍
 

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The OP said:



:)

Hence, flat battery 👍
To clarify even if my CRV headlights are set to ON - they will automatically turn off if I turn off and leave the car. Maybe it's a feature in the U.S. - but I haven't owned a car in many years that allowed the headlights to drain the battery because the electronics automatically turn them off even if in the ON position (versus AUTO).
 

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To clarify even if my CRV headlights are set to ON - they will automatically turn off if I turn off and leave the car. Maybe it's a feature in the U.S. - but I haven't owned a car in many years that allowed the headlights to drain the battery because the electronics automatically turn them off even if in the ON position (versus AUTO).
There is a safety lockout that will in fact turn off lights left on (both exterior and interior), but you are going to see significant drain of the battery before it kicks in. I you were to do that multiple times in between short driving trips, the battery will get more depleted each day until it fails to start the vehicle.

That auto disable of the lights feature is meant for occasional activation when an owner makes a mistake and leaves vehicle lighting on. It is NOT for daily use in lieu of properly shutting down your vehicle and insuring you have left no lights on, and have left no doors ajar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Hello all. Just to close this thread. Thanks for all the responses. So we took it to the dealer and they said the battery had a "bad cell" and not a bad battery.. Lol. They said the exact same thing when my 2017 battery died. Bad cell = bad battery. As others stated I am sure the dealer just rolled the dice on the original battery hoping it would make it to some point in the future and sell us another. It may have tested OK but obviously it was not. Good news is they gave us a free battery and I showed the wife the auto option.
Again thanks.
 

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If you are replacing your battery every 6 months you don't have a battery problem. You have a problem with an electrical connection or what is called a parasitic power drain, where an electrical component in the car is draining the battery. Sounds like you need to get professional help to figure out why you are replacing batteries so often.
 

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If you are replacing your battery every 6 months you don't have a battery problem. You have a problem with an electrical connection or what is called a parasitic power drain, where an electrical component in the car is draining the battery. Sounds like you need to get professional help to figure out why you are replacing batteries so often.
Could be this problem "17-032 Honda Technical Service Bulletin" or something else? TSB 17-032
Also installed Dash camera which is wired to battery to work after car is turned off (connected through dash cam hardwired kit)
and led door steps.Everything was installed in a shop.
 

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First check if you vehicle's VIN falls within the range of affected vehicles listed in TSB 17-032.
If your vehicle is affected then get this software update.
Next you will need to have the current draw on the battery measured when parked to see if it exceeds the normal max draw of about .03 amps. Also don't rule out the charging system. If the battery doesn't get a proper charge it will slowly sulfate the battery and kill them.
 

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Could be this problem "17-032 Honda Technical Service Bulletin" or something else? TSB 17-032
Also installed Dash camera which is wired to battery to work after car is turned off (connected through dash cam hardwired kit)
and led door steps.Everything was installed in a shop.
Hard to believe anyone owning a 2017 CRV has not had this software fix applied though. Especially with the vehicle having an initial 3/36 factory warranty.

Also, it presented most often as rapid discharge over a short period of time, and would present a dead battery which in turn would drive the owner to seek service to resolve. This is not a six month cycle style event.

I guess if they scrupulously avoid ever visiting a Honda dealership, and only use independent service providers they could miss this TSB being applied to their vehicle. But I am of the view that owners who choose this service route, have a personal self interest in keeping tabs on open TSBs for their model/year/trim of CRV.

Persistent failure of a starter battery every 6-12 months indicates some form of abnormal parasitc drain on the battery that needs to be isolated and resolved. That would definitely have driven me to a Honda dealership to take advantage of the bumper to bumper warranty in the first few years.
 

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Next you will need to have the current draw on the battery measured when parked to see if it exceeds the normal max draw of about .03 amps. Also don't rule out the charging system. If the battery doesn't get a proper charge it will slowly sulfate the battery and kill them.
(y)

And to add to Traylaws recommendation here, infrequent short in town driving style (where you literally only put a couple thousand miles per year on a vehicle)... takes a heavier toll now days on modern vehicles starter batteries. This is largely due to the fact that the battery never gets properly topped up on charge when driving, after sitting for days undriven.

In effect.. infrequent and short trips present a slow slow death cycle at play here with this particular driving style, which is one reason I strongly recommend low miles, short trip, infrequent drivers invest a good quality smart battery charger/maintainer (preferably one with a reconditioning cycle built in as part of the charging cycle). Putting your vehicle on a smart charger overnight once a week will help mitigate the sulfation of plates caused by the battery being persistently below 90% charge.

Also, running a battery performance test one a month, using one of many hand held consumer battery testers available now days, means you will always have a good objective measure of how healthy your battery actually is at any given point in time. It also gives you plenty of advance warning once your battery does approach it's end of life. For normal, non trauma induced, end of life of a starter battery, routine monthly performance checks means you will see a battery heading off the life cliff at least 6 months before it fails on you... giving you plenty of time to replace it before failure.
 
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