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Just a general rant, I'm aware that there's not really an answer. My wife called me yesterday from a local store saying that she came out and the battery was dead on our 2010 CRV. I drove to where she was in my truck and gave her a jump start. I knew that battery was a little over three years old so I had her follow me to the auto parts store. I replaced the battery and everything is fine now, however here is my complaint:

This is the second time I have replaced the battery in the CRV and the exact same thing happened the first time around, the car just refused to start and I had to jump it. Both times there was no prior indication that there was any problem with the battery. I know that the problem is not unique to the CRV, I have a Toyota truck that has done the same thing. Luckily it has always happened during the day, in good weather, and close to home but I always think what if you were out of town or way out in the boonies somewhere, you'd just be stuck. Back in the day you used to be able to tell when a battery was dying, it would usually start cranking slower so you would know that it was time to replace it but it seems that they are now designed to go out with no warning whatsoever.

The only solution I can think of is to just proactively replace the battery every 3 years to be safe, but the last battery I put in my truck lasted almost 5 years before going out so you just can't really tell.

Anyway, rant over, just wanted to vent my aggravation! :)
 

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I think the problem is you haven't really found the problem you've only 'fixed' the symptom. The battery won't crank the engine is a symptom of the battery being dead. Why is the battery dead? Until you figure out that 'why' you haven't solved the problem. Our '13 model battery was about to give up. I could tell by the way it would crank sometimes and after having found it with the plates uncovered ie low fluid at about a year and a half old, I knew it wasn't going to last much past 3 years. Hopefully putting in a bigger battery has solved our situation of the charging system not keeping up with our short trip demands on the original battery.
Did you bother to have the battery checked to see what its problem might have been?
Low fluid, especially on a maintenance free battery, is a killer and the battery manufacturer's have it down to a science, IMO, as to just how many times a car will be started and used in 3 years time. I've had my share of batteries die just at or a little past the 'normal' 3 yr warranty period.
I refuse to be dragged into the 'replace it in 3 yrs' cycle battery manufacturer's want to impose on us. I will be watching the fluid level in our new one more closely than I did our original one (which I really didn't like since it was sooo puny[small]). With care I think it should last for 7-8 yrs, maybe longer.
 

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You're right, the newer batteries usually don't give any indication they're about to go dead. Years ago you'd get a couple weeks of weak starting before they died.
Same thing happened to me in my Maxima, car started fine, never any indication the battery was weak then one Saturday afternoon at the mall --- dead. Luckily there was a Sears automotive at the other end of the mall.

Since then I replace my two car batteries every 3 - 3 1/3 years no matter what.
 

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Common issue with our CRVs due to the software controlling the charging system. There have been a couple of software update TSBs issues for my 2012. I've experienced the exact symptom you described 4 times now, each time without any warning at all. I've replaced the battery twice, and am resigned that it should be done every 2 years (in my case anyway) even though it seems perfectly fine. I also recently bought one of those small 12V jump-packs to keep in the vehicle.
 

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Doug - Did you replace the battery with the same sized one it came with?
 

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I'm hoping it will solve the problem. Seems to me the charging protocol (software code) is set up such that the battery is allowed to get really low. It (the code) then calls for the alternator to really over charge the battery. This is evidenced (to me anyways) by all the people who've said they replaced their batteries and found the originals bulging on the sides. That and the boiling off of the fluid in multiple cells tells me the charging system isn't what it should be. Yeah, it can charge the battery up, but doing so with massive doses of charge isn't the way it should be done, IMO. Honda is writing the code such that it gets the most out of the time when the alternator isn't charging, as that's when it's using less power from the engine (and therefore gas).
It's all in the name of 'better' mileage.
So far, our switch to a bigger battery has resulted in faster starts as the engine fairly leaps out of the hood when you hit the key now.
I wish you good luck with your new OEM battery, but I'm betting we'll be hearing from you in 2.5-3 yrs time again about it.
 

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OTOH:

We have experienced acceptable battery life (6 -7 years in un-garaged cars) with both our Fit and CR-V. The Fit's type 151R battery looked like it was sized for a lawn tractor. :mad:
Many other owners get only 2 - 3 years out of theirs.


I think the issue with the sudden, unexpected failures, is the summertime reduction of the electrolyte level in the batteries. Of course, you don't notice there is a problem until winter, when more starting amps are required.

So put a reminder on your calendar to check the battery fluid every fall!
 

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Wow. I'm surprised at this short battery life. I sold my 2004 Ford Escape last summer, with an 8 year old working battery, and bought a 2014 CR-V,and am now surprised that the battery has died on me. Not even 5 years seems short to me. My Ford Escape's battery (which i checked when I bought that vehicle used) had a 100 month pro-rated warranty. I see these replacement batteries for the CR-V have a 24-36 month prorated warranty. Different world I guess. Dang! They are pricey too!
 

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I'm surprised also. Our 2009 CR-V battery was 6 years old, and the only reason I replaced it was because I was going on a long term assignment away from home and I didn't want my wife to have to worry. Our 2014 CR-V battery was 4 years old and the only reason I replaced it was because my 10 year old diesel tractor battery died, so I took the 4 year old 2014 Hondas battery and put it in the tractor and placed a new identical sized battery in the 2014 Honda.
 
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